the call to complete discipleship not only to those in ministry, but to us all in Jesus

In the same way, those of you who do not give up everything you have cannot be my disciples.

Luke 14

We often think that only pastors or those in “full time Christian service” are called to be completely set apart for ministry (2 Timothy 2), while the rest of us will even necessarily be engaged in the affairs of this world.

But Jesus’s call to discipleship is to us all. We remember that Jesus himself was fully involved in the world he was raised up in. Doing carpentry or whatever kind of work it was (whatever the term actually means) up until the time of his call to ministry at around the age of thirty. But that time did not exempt him at all from complete devotion to his Father, which we have inklings of in the narrative before, when he was a twelve year old in the temple (Luke 2). The world system or aspects of it which are opposed to God (systemic evil) we must be completely opposed to. But the everyday matters which can occupy our lives, and so much of our time, we’re to be fully engaged in to the glory of God. And to do so as those who are followers of Christ by the Spirit.

This certainly involves so much as spilled out and spelled out in scripture. And only possible by God’s grace through the Spirit. Through God’s call we can overcome and follow fully. Even though along the way we will stumble, and we won’t do it perfectly. But we want to endeavor to get back up, keep going, and keep on following no matter what. Given to us, completely a gift in and through Jesus.

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the call to prayer

Deep calls to deep
    in the roar of your waterfalls;
all your waves and breakers
    have swept over me.

Psalm 42

Sometimes there is nothing we can do, but groan. When life seems overwhelming, and we’re at a complete loss to know what to do. Or when we lose hope, or are near despair. When some things make sense, but others make no sense at all.

God would help us during such times to simply be still and quiet before him. Yes, to cry out to him. But above all to be in the kind of prayer that is looking to God for what might be said, or probably better yet, what God could put on our hearts, even write on them.

The Spirit is present in and through Jesus to help us. Individually and together. To seek and find God’s good will for us, and for others. In the love of God that is always and forever present no matter what, in and through Jesus.

…the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us through wordless groans. And he who searches our hearts knows the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for God’s people in accordance with the will of God.

Romans 8

grieving the loss of one of Jesus’s loved servants

Precious in the sight of the Lord
    is the death of his faithful servants.

Psalm 116:15; NIV

The church we’ve been attending, and are in the process of joining lost a faithful servant who I never had the pleasure of meeting myself. But a young woman, married with a daughter, who was in love with her family, in love with life, and most of all in love with the Lord. In a tragic car accident. She was a faithful servant with a heart for children’s ministry. I want to say that this church, mega though it is, with a number of campuses, does everything so thoughtfully and well. Most of all bathed in love and prayers, prayers and love. The church has a big place and heart for children, and for children’s ministry, as it should be. And this young (to me) lady had what she considered her dream job in being in children’s ministry, coordinating that ministry on the main campus.

We are deeply grieving, but how much more those who knew her, especially her loved ones? And those who were her friends, and served with her in the work of the Lord? So our prayers along with our hearts go out to her loved ones, and to the church at this time.

I couldn’t understand how this could be. I have been so grateful for the ministry of this church in so many ways, for so many reasons. We can never be the same after this, I’m sure. We need God’s grace to carry on. How much more those who knew and loved her, and served with her. You get so close to the Lord and then to others through the Lord through a ministry like this. Little does one realize what they have sometimes, until it’s taken away. Or sometimes, sadly, we may not appreciate someone enough until they’re gone.

In the context of Psalm 116, God had rescued the psalmist from death in answer to prayer, and the psalmist was praising God for that. I’m sure that psalm alone can be one for meditation and prayer in the coming days, although there are so many passages in scripture in which we can find some help, comfort and solace.

Note the differences in how Psalm 116:15 is translated:

The Lord cares deeply
    when his loved ones die.

NLT

The death of the Lord’s faithful
    is a costly loss in his eyes.

CEB

The Lord values
the lives of his faithful followers.

NET Bible

I think the footnote of the NET Bible is helpful:

Heb “precious in the eyes of the Lord [is] the death of his godly ones.” The point is not that God delights in or finds satisfaction in the death of his followers! The psalmist, who has been delivered from death, affirms that the life-threatening experiences of God’s followers get God’s attention, just as a precious or rare object would attract someone’s eye. See Ps 72:14 for a similar expression of this belief.

We have to let this sit, while we sit before the Lord in silence. And while we reach out in love to those whose lives intersected closely with hers.

She is with the Lord she loved now, and I’m sure is full of complete joy and peace. I am not sure about whether or just how she might be interceding for those left behind, if departed ones do that. That could well be; it’s a tradition of the church, though I don’t think there’s any proof for it from scripture. But I’m sure she would want those left behind to continue on in the work of the Lord. And do well in it. In God’s love.

But some things can leave the heart numb for a time, especially in this case for those left behind. We want to ask the question, “Why Lord?” And we can. But we have to trust, as well. Even when it makes no sense at all. And when we say, we don’t care what good might come out of it. We don’t care at all. We don’t understand. But in the end, we have to entrust and leave it in God’s hands. And let it go at that. In silence. And in faith.

At the very end, when it’s all said and done, our lives are only a blink of time here. These awful happenings will be remembered no more. And we’ll all be together again. Let’s continue on with the same love, passion and ardent devotion this young lady showed to all by her life and service to Jesus. In and through him.

dependence on God

I am looking forward to reading this book: Becoming Dallas Willard: The Formation of a Philosopher, Teacher, and Christ Follower. We so often think life depends on us; in fact that is our default position to which we regularly go. Unless we’ve trained ourselves with the help of the Holy Spirit in God’s grace to learn dependence on God, so that we regularly practice that. Until it becomes more and more a part of who we are. This is what I think of when I think of Dallas Willard.

I have read at least three of his books, and heard him speak at a church, I think I remember shaking hands with him afterward, and on retrospect, given what I’ve heard of him and his life, I feel blessed. A humble, gifted man, who above all else practiced an utterly dependent life on God through Jesus, in the context of God’s will as given to us in scripture, and especially the New Testament.

Just the mere thought along with pondering it is a blessing to me. We need those who have gone before us and have practiced this. A true mentor in the faith knows what they’re talking about firsthand. Otherwise it’s completely empty, and will help no one.

That is my goal, relatively late both in my life, and Christian life. To learn utter dependence on God through Christ by the Holy Spirit. I guess I would say the most upfront goal, so to speak, the rest following out of that. Growth in compliance to the first and greatest commandment and the second like it: to love God with one’s whole being and doing, and to love our neighbor as ourselves, will arise out of this. Only by faith can we enter into the love that God is in Christ, experiencing that for ourselves, so that we can love others with that same love.

Of course there’s much too the Christian life: the church, continuing through trial including “the dark night of the soul,” etc., etc. What we have to learn to do is to trust God more and more. Which goes along with a passage God seemed to impress on me a few years back, Proverbs 3:5-6. In and through Jesus.

what gives meaning to it all: Love

Now eagerly desire the greater gifts.

And yet I will show you the most excellent way.

If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

1 Corinthians 12:31-13:3

A couple years ago, I made a decision which in retrospect ended up being like a born again experience. At work I used to sit by myself during lunch at a little table and read the psalms. I did that month after month, maybe piling into a couple years or more. Time flies. But I decided to call that quits, and instead, sit at a break table with a group of people I struggled to understand and relate to. A couple of guys were getting close to retirement, so I was with them the last year or more before that, at the table.

God met me there in a way that wasn’t better than in reading in word, but in a sense it was, only because I was in a place where I could start putting the word into practice. Just by being present, and learning to meld into the fellowship, or communion, as a friend. Although I work at a Christian ministry, this would make sense anywhere. After all, Jesus ate and drank with tax collectors and sinners.

The heart of this is learning to get at the heart of all that is: the God who is love. God is Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and as such, God is essentially a relational being. And to be relational and in relationships is part of what it means to be human. And in Jesus, the brokenness of our existence in not doing well in this, indeed relationships themselves can be redeemed and reconciled.

So it matters not at all what I might think I know, or even what I do, if love isn’t at the heart of it all. And for that to be so, I need to be open to being vulnerable, and I need to learn to love and receive love from others. People have to be together, and as Christians, Jesus is then with us. He promises to be present wherever two or more are gathered in his name. Then we can find and begin to experience and understand the real, unadulterated, pure love. And hopefully begin to live and grow in that. By God’s grace. In and through Jesus.

in the trouble zone

“Mortals, born of woman,
    are of few days and full of trouble.”

Job 14:1

There is much to ponder and take in from the wisdom of Job. I’m thinking of the book as a whole, but Job’s words here are observant, to say the least. It seems like the goal of most people and much of the advertisement which appeals to us is to arrive to some kind of trouble free existence. But no matter how far science and technology may take us, as well as knowledge that no doubt can help, trouble really awaits us at every turn.

Probably half the battle for us is to accept that reality up front, and learn in a sense to relax in it. Some matters aren’t worth the time of day, nagging problems which we might or might not address at some time, maybe if we’re annoyed enough. But other issues we will be compelled to consider and work on with the knowledge that we may or may not be able to arrive at some satisfactory conclusion except to leave it in God’s hands.

As one work friend used to say: “Do your best and hang the rest.” Basically that’s all we can do. We have to stop thinking the world, or any given matter in it depends on us at all. It’s not like we may not have a role to play, but its outcome is ultimately up to God. That said, we should do what we can to resolve the problems which come our way. And the way everything is, the “honey do” list, or whatever you might call it, will never end. Instead of denying all of this, and retreating into either a disengagement, or even denial of trouble, we should face it. Believing that God can and will give us the wisdom to address it (James 1:2-5). And that the process will even be good. In and through Jesus.