thoughts on the baptism of our Lord

But now, this is what the Lord says—
he who created you, Jacob,
he who formed you, Israel:
“Do not fear, for I have redeemed you;
I have summoned you by name; you are mine.
When you pass through the waters,
I will be with you;
and when you pass through the rivers,
they will not sweep over you.
When you walk through the fire,
you will not be burned;
the flames will not set you ablaze.
For I am the Lord your God,
the Holy One of Israel, your Savior;
I give Egypt for your ransom,
Cush and Seba in your stead.
Since you are precious and honored in my sight,
and because I love you,
I will give people in exchange for you,
nations in exchange for your life.
Do not be afraid, for I am with you;
I will bring your children from the east
and gather you from the west.
I will say to the north, ‘Give them up!’
and to the south, ‘Do not hold them back.’
Bring my sons from afar
and my daughters from the ends of the earth—
everyone who is called by my name,
whom I created for my glory,
whom I formed and made.”

Isaiah 43:1-7

The people were waiting expectantly and were all wondering in their hearts if John might possibly be the Messiah. John answered them all, “I baptize you with water. But one who is more powerful than I will come, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fork is in his hand to clear his threshing floor and to gather the wheat into his barn, but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire.”

When all the people were being baptized, Jesus was baptized too. And as he was praying, heaven was opened and the Holy Spirit descended on him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven: “You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased.”

Luke 3:15-17, 21-22

Father Michael Cupp shared from these two passages along with some thoughts on the Epiphany and the Magi, traditionally wise men, from Matthew 2:1-12.

The entire sermon was striking to me, but the imagery of the Isaiah 43 passage linked to baptism, especially (once again, I think) stood out to me. Water baptism ends up being more than a symbol. It is a passsageway through death into resurrection in and through Jesus. Who submitted to a baptism he didn’t need himself, but which he did need to undergo for the world in anticipation of his death, burial and resurrection. Baptism sets us apart as God’s people in the world. And like our Lord, the Spirit comes anew and afresh for the task that we are given in God’s work in the world.

 

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