the importance of sound doctrine

What you heard from me, keep as the pattern of sound teaching, with faith and love in Christ Jesus. Guard the good deposit that was entrusted to you—guard it with the help of the Holy Spirit who lives in us.

2 Timothy 1:13-14

Nowadays, it’s not like the need for sound doctrine is scuttled, though I think it often is. It simply is the case that there’s some unsound doctrine as in teaching which is accepted as sound biblical teaching. We have to be on our guard. Especially dangerous is the teaching which comes from churches with an emphasis on a direct knowledge from God, as if they are the purveyors of truth unlike other churches around them. That is a form of gnosticism in the idea that they are the enlightened ones, and the rest of the church is not.

I think the passage quoted above, Paul’s last letter, gets to the heart of the issue. We have to get back to both scripture, and to what the church has taught through the Holy Spirit. Both. We have an unhealthy tendency to appeal to one or the other: either scripture alone, as if it’s in a vaccuum, or the Spirit and experience alone especially as given to certain leaders in the church. When actually we need both together, and discernment from the entire church by the Spirit through the word.

Thankfully within evangelicalism there is an awakening to a new appreciation of the Great Tradition and what the church by the Spirit has taught from scripture through the centuries, especially pertaining to the gospel. The evangelical tradition for all the beating it takes, some of the criticism justified, at least is strong in seeking to promote sound instruction from scripture. They can frankly outdo most of their critics from other church traditions in that regard. But the failure on evangelicalism’s part to make the Lord’s Table the climax and center of a service, is a telling one, inherited from the emphasis which occurred at the Protestant Reformation.

Deb and I left the infant Anglican church plant to take our granddaughter to a church which has programs for kids. I think we’ve found a suitable church now, which is solid in what they believe and teach, even if they don’t agree fully on what the Spirit has given the church through the centuries to believe and practice. I miss the liturgical, the confession of sin, recitation of the Nicene Creed, the broken body and blood of the Lord in the bread and cup. But we do appreciate what is present: a strong emphasis of teaching the word, and hopefully along with that the gospel which is at the heart of the word. That is what we hope for at this present time for our granddaughter.

And I might add, I  believe the church should be engaged in good works to help the poor to get on their feet and to become established through the gospel. Without question this should be an emphasis of every church. Teaching is not enough; practice must follow. Too often Christians depend on the state to do what the state cannot possibly do in the same way the church can and should do. Of course the state should fulfill its responsibility; any good society should look after its own, with safety nets for the poor in helping the poor toward a self-sustaining existence. But only the church through the gospel can help both the rich and the poor and everyone to find the life that is truly life, the eternal life that is in God through Christ.

Sound doctrine matters, and I do appreciate the emphasis of the best of the evangelical tradition in teaching and promoting that, insofar as they understand that. They need to keep working on the other part, to which they are awakening. And never forget to work at helping the poor and needy and oppressed and disabled in and through the name of Jesus. So that they in turn can help others in and through Jesus. Amen.

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