the real thing

If only for this life we have hope in Christ, we are of all people most to be pitied.

But Christ has indeed been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.

1 Corinthians 15:19-20

There is no one who enjoys a coffee, and even better yet, a beer with a friend, then I do. And how about some good Beatles music, and better yet, Bach? And what about a trip to sight see, like for example in the Rocky Mountains? Or to relax and chill in some resort area, a real vacation? Do we enjoy weddings, and what matters from that beginning, the marriage which follows? Of course. It’s not like we Christians can’t enjoy good things that are a part of creation. It’s just that we know there’s more, much more. And we won’t settle for second best.

As usual, it’s a bit more complicated than that. But the marriage analogy not only surely helps, but hopefully will make the point. What day is more happy than one’s wedding day? We might say especially so for the bride, but is it really less so for the groom? I’ve only been a groom, so I can’t say. Ha. But what follows, probably beginning with the honeymoon, but especially after the honeymoon experience begins to wear off is real life. Life in a relationship between two flawed individuals, who little know what they’ve gotten themselves into, given the seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day together existence of marriage. Having to learn to work though issues together, such issues including shortcomings and indeed, even sins, especially of the tongue which need to be taken care of in confession to each other, and forgiveness given. But to get back to the point of this post, marriage is an apt analogy of the reality that there’s more, much more which needs to break into this old creation: nothing less than the new creation in and through Jesus.

1 Corinthians 15 (link above will take you to the entire chapter) is a remarkable chapter in which Paul advocates the resurrection, and specifically the resurrection of Christ as at the heart of the gospel. And for Paul, his entire life was lived in service to Christ and to the gospel, to the point which other things in comparison hardly mattered at all to him in his personal life. Others had a wife or husband, but Paul didn’t. Others received compensation so they could continue on in preaching the gospel, whereas he (at least, often) refused such (1 Corinthians 9). He certainly lived a difficult existence to say the least (1 Corinthians 4; 2 Corinthians not letting up on that theme one iota). To him to live was Christ, and to die, gain (Philippians 1). He was at the front of the new movement of the gospel, the good news who is Jesus with all that means, and one would expect serious opposition to that, and not an easy road for a number of reasons, not the least of which was God’s work of preparation to help him to be ready to suffer for Jesus’s sake. And Paul tells us (through the word/scripture, by extension to us today) to follow him as he followed Christ.

1 Corinthians 15 (if you haven’t read it at all, or recently, it wouldn’t hurt to do so now) is a remarkable word on how the good news in Jesus in the resurrection in him makes living for today and this world without a thought for tomorrow, or specifically the life after this life, such a sad, even fatal mistake. In Christ we get caught up into a new existence which while enjoying this life, by faith knows that the real life is in him, bringing in the new creation, bringing us into the life of the Trinity, the true eternal life, beginning in this present life in the power of Christ’s resurrection, but destined to take over the world in the new creation. A destiny which sees this life as both the beginning and means through nothing less than death and resurrection in Jesus of arrival to what we have inklings and even real  beginnings of now, but can’t be imagined apart from the revelation of the Spirit (1 Corinthians 2). And so, we continue on.

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