Titus: the “do good” book

At one time we too were foolish, disobedient, deceived and enslaved by all kinds of passions and pleasures. We lived in malice and envy, being hated and hating one another. But when the kindness and love of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of his mercy. He saved us through the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs having the hope of eternal life. This is a trustworthy saying. And I want you to stress these things, so that those who have trusted in God may be careful to devote themselves to doing what is good. These things are excellent and profitable for everyone.

Titus 3

If there’s one thing Christians ought to be known for, it should be for the good they do. Not for their political positions, be they left, right, moderate or something else, as far as US politics are concerned. Not over who they either voted, or didn’t vote for, either.

Don’t get me wrong. Doctrine is important, and indeed underrated in some quarters, probably in more and more places nowadays. Read the short book of Titus (link above is the entire book), and you’ll see that giving short shrift on doctrine does not pass muster as far as this little book is concerned. It is true that people, even so-called churches which don’t hold to the necessity of Jesus’s resurrection from the dead might indeed be engaged in good works. But they are no more gospel, or kingdom of God oriented than any atheist, or non-Christian religion which does the same. Doing good is good regardless. But it’s not necessarily Christian.

Notice the NIV outline of the book from the link above. Here they are in turn: “Appointing Elders Who Love What Is Good,” “Rebuking Those Who Fail to Do Good,” “Doing Good for the Sake of the Gospel,” “Saved in Order to Do Good” and “Final Remarks.” Notice how the book ends just before the final greetings and salutation:

Our people must learn to devote themselves to doing what is good, in order to provide for urgent needs and not live unproductive lives.

There are no two ways about it. We either do good, or we don’t reflect the faith we profess. The early Christians were known for that. We need to be known for that as well, both in helping each other, and in serving every one. In our following of Jesus, in and through him.

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One comment on “Titus: the “do good” book

  1. Great post Ted! Praying for you all today!!

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