the neglected Second Coming

When I was younger, there was no hotter topic than Jesus’s Second Coming, usually called the rapture, which was supposed to take the church away before the Great Tribulation, therefore called a pretrib-rapture. Hal Lindsay is well known for his book, The Late Great Planet Earth. I, along with many others had my copy and read it. He is still teaching to this day, and from the time I heard him, right along those same lines, though at one time he finally drew a line and expected Jesus to return no later than a certain year, which since has come and gone. One characteristic of such teachers and preachers is their propensity to point to nations and specific people as possible players, for example, so and so, as the anti-christ.

For obvious reasons, such teaching, though still strong in pockets has fallen on hard times. Part of that has been the modification in many quarters of dispensationalism, at least in part influenced by reformed theology, and to some extent, the Great Tradition. Maybe a larger part due to the simple fact that events like Israel’s Six-Day War, come and go, and we really don’t seem any closer to the end than before.

Christians go back to the Book, and I am in Mark 13 in my ongoing daily Bible meditation right now. A number of prominent evangelical scholars today see Jesus’s prediction entirely fulfilled in the Fall of Jerusalem in AD 70. I tend to think that way myself, given the specifics of that passage and the nature of the language used as reflected in the Old/First Testament prophets.

The sad fact of the matter is that the Second Coming of Christ, which is part of the gospel, has fallen on hard times, little preached and taught, so that even though all Christians have a nominal belief in it, it doesn’t seem to be sufficiently a part of any living faith, so that it does not impact day to day living. I have recently concluded for myself, that hope is perhaps my weakest link of the triad: faith, hope and love. Though I certainly have plenty of room to shore up, and actually grow in the others. I little think of heaven, or the after-life (the new heavens, and the new earth), and probably even less on Jesus’s return.

Somehow we need a return to preaching and teaching on Jesus’s Second Coming. Approaches like N. T. Wright’s and Scot McKnight’s can help us, on God’s grace and kingdom being present in King Jesus now through the gospel in the church, with the promise of fulfillment in a completion when Jesus bodily returns and restores all things in the completed new creation. At the very least, it seems to me, this should be a part of our daily faith understanding, confession and creed.

We need to take back this teaching, held hostage for some time by unhelpful, mistaken approaches. It is an important part of God’s word, of the gospel, the promise in Jesus. May God stamp it on our hearts, and help it to become a part of our lives, how we live and why, in and through Jesus.

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