Martin Luther’s greatest contribution remembered on the 500th anniversary of the Reformation

For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.

Ephesians 2:8-10

Martin Luther may have been the greatest of the Protestant Reformers. A book I would highly recommend is Timothy George’s Theology of the Reformers, in which something of the complexity of that time is presented with a full, succinct look at the theology of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and Menno Simons, the last one not really wanting to reform the church, but start over according to the New Testament teaching- but by and by realizing, that you can’t just start from scratch, but must take into account the early centuries of the church when they wrestled through teachings on the Trinity and who Jesus is in his humanity and Deity.

Martin Luther and John Calvin may have been the most gifted of the Reformers, certainly not without their flaws, but it’s a mistake to simply brush them off. They are important church fathers contributing to the church’s understanding and edification in the faith.

Martin Luther himself, and what he accomplished is nothing short of amazing. Of course he would say, and it’s so true that it was not him, but the grace of God in and at work in him. Maybe his greatest contribution was to uncover and unshackle the gospel from the church’s traditions which had all but buried it. And this is not at all to say that all tradition is bad. Every church necessarily so, I think, and in reality has tradition. The question might be whether it’s good, or not, not whether a church should have tradition.

Martin Luther’s insistence from scripture that we are saved by grace alone through Christ alone is at the heart of understanding how the gospel, the good news in Jesus becomes good news for the one who hears or reads of it. God’s grace is a gift, one neither deserved, nor earned, which we receive by simple faith apart from works. Because of Christ’s work for us on the cross in his death, as well as his resurrection and what followed. It is a powerful, living salvation for sure, all in and through Jesus.

Advertisements

whatever else, “Follow me”

Then [Jesus] said to [Peter], “Follow me!”

Peter turned and saw that the disciple whom Jesus loved was following them. (This was the one who had leaned back against Jesus at the supper and had said, “Lord, who is going to betray you?”) When Peter saw him, he asked, “Lord, what about him?”

Jesus answered, “If I want him to remain alive until I return, what is that to you? You must follow me.”

John 21:19b-22

On the eve of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation when Martin Luther nailed the 95 theses to the door of the (Catholic) church in Wittenberg, there is some fanfare, and much thought given to what the Reformation means for us today. There is no question as to its impact on both the church and society in the west, and really from that, throughout the world.

I am interested, yet wary and weary over the entire thing. I’m glad there are younger people, and those set apart in their study to pursue these questions. They certainly have relevance for our time and beyond. And it’s not like I’m going to tune out completely.

But like Peter, I think we do well to hear our Lord’s call to us, regardless of what else goes on around us, or what others are doing. We need to hear that call and be faithful to it. Certainly not apart from the church, but as a part of it, which is an important aspect of what following Jesus involves.

A call to follow Jesus. In everything. By God’s grace in and through him.

when life doesn’t seem right

How long, Lord, must I call for help,
    but you do not listen?
Or cry out to you, “Violence!”
    but you do not save?
Why do you make me look at injustice?
    Why do you tolerate wrongdoing?
Destruction and violence are before me;
    there is strife, and conflict abounds.
Therefore the law is paralyzed,
    and justice never prevails.
The wicked hem in the righteous,
    so that justice is perverted.

Habakkuk 1:2-4

If you’ve lived long enough, and for too many it’s too soon, you will know that something is not only not quite right, but too often just plain downright and perhaps even blatantly wrong. Habakkuk saw this, even an insight from the Lord which he received as a prophecy. He wrestled through, and received God’s response, and then worshiped with a confession of faith, in the end.

What do we do when we see injustice, and experience wrong ourselves? Too often we curse the darkness, or we complain and grumble to others. We don’t know if Habakkuk did any of that. We do know from the book, that he took his concern to the Lord, and that the Lord responded. An important key to the book is that God answered. That made all the difference in the world.

It’s not that God’s reply in its content is always welcomed, or easily understood, in fact it might provoke more questions, which was the case with Habakkuk. But he did not leave what amounted to a kind of conversation. And in the end, he had not only God’s answer, but a faith that would see God and worship him, as well as enable Habakkuk to glorify God in the midst of difficulty. Rather than disillusionment and despair, there was a faith and worship.

Hopefully the Lord can help me to that, today.

A great book to read on a Saturday, and prayerfully ponder.

 

fight on

Fight the good fight of the faith. Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called when you made your good confession in the presence of many witnesses.

1 Timothy 6:12

Life alone throws enough hard challenges due to all the inherent limitations as well as the brokenness present in creation. But add to that being bearers of the gospel, the good news in Jesus in the midst of the world, the flesh and the devil, and the fight is on.

Paul told Timothy, at the end of that great letter 1 Timothy, to fight, of course nothing more and nothing less than a spiritual fight, “the good fight of the faith.” Really in Jesus that’s what we’re supposed to be all about. Not fights over politics, or even religion. Not fights over who is right or wrong about whatever. Certainly not fisticuffs.

We have to fight on, and we have to fight hard. And to the end. Paul’s last letter would seem to verify that:

For I am already being poured out like a drink offering, and the time for my departure is near. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day—and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.

2 Timothy 4:6-8

So hopefully I’ll have the grace of God to keep doing that, along with others in Jesus to the end.

the Father says don’t be anxious, period, but instead…

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

Sometimes I wonder if the absolutes are really absolute. I prefer to see a lot of the commands as loving directives by a Father, and in a sense, I’m sure they are. Tone matters. But the words still come across as absolutes in the sense that we’re to brook no compromise whatsoever, but simply do what we’re told to do.

I also believe a loving Father sees our sincere attempts, as weak as they are, and in grace honors them. And then helps us. The help comes. It may not seem as immediate as we like, but then again, neither was our compliance to this directive immediate. Oddly enough the answer may have already come, but our brain and heart have to get acclimated to the new reality. Of course part of the answer will be to be transformed by the renewing of our minds (Romans 12:2), and that is a lifelong process, as well as renewing thoughts coming to us by the Spirit when need be.

Interestingly, we often turn to the above passage only after we have succumbed to anxiety and fear, and are perhaps steeped in worry. I would like to better apply this before the fall in that pit happens. To either try to lessen it, or avoid it altogether.

It is such a difference, either being in the light, or in the darkness. It is either a light or darkness which penetrates one’s very soul, their entire life. So that every act in the light is a delight, and in the dark is more like drudgery with difficulty. And at times, it seems I can be somewhere between.

Faith needs awakening, and so these times of being tempted, or even falling into the anxiety may serve that purpose. Nevertheless this passage, God’s word, tells us not to be anxious about anything. Pretty absolute from a loving Father. But instead in every situation to pray and ask God with thanksgiving with the promise that his peace will guard our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

I hope to be more alert and faithful in applying this, next time something comes to my mind that is troubling on that level for me. Part of my growth in grace, I take it, in and through Jesus.

relax into routine: part of rest

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

Some jobs seem so high stress, and maybe to a point are, especially at certain junctures. But once we get used to them, they can in a way become “old hat” to us. We can learn to settle down, maybe slow down, and simply be at rest.

Jesus’s words invite us into that kind of activity, even routine of being at rest when we work. Because he is with us, we are with him, and he is making the load light.

Part of living in this world though is to live under the curse of Genesis 3:

To Adam [the LORD God] said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’

“Cursed is the ground because of you;
    through painful toil you will eat food from it
    all the days of your life.
It will produce thorns and thistles for you,
    and you will eat the plants of the field.
By the sweat of your brow
    you will eat your food
until you return to the ground,
    since from it you were taken;
for dust you are
    and to dust you will return.”

Genesis 3:17-19

Humankind in the story is agrarian at that point: working the ground to plant and cultivate vegetation and fruit was a large part of what they did. But now they would have to contend with all sorts of problems. Creation would seem to become at odds with itself.

And that’s what we find in our work, even though most of it is not agriculture. Even with human manipulation, we run into all sorts of problems. Humanity is inherently limited. Although it appears from Genesis 11 that they are more than capable intellectually, so that in that story God stopped what they were doing. Knowledge is not enough. Humanity needs wisdom as well, and not the worldly wisdom of the serpent, but the loving wisdom of the kingdom of God and the shalom (translated “peace” and including the meaning of flourishing) that comes with it.

Somehow we need, even in the midst of trouble and seeming failure to learn to have a restful spirit in all we do. Not given to panic, not in fear of this or that. And even when we have to “grab the bull by the horns,” so to speak, we need to do so as people who are at rest. Believing that our work is not only God-ordained, work being good, part of creation, but that also we do so as those who would be in gospel kingdom work with our Lord, which somehow can be weaved into the other work, and maybe become a part of it.

That’s my goal, to relax into the routine, becoming more and more at rest in and through Jesus.