what’s a loving parent to do?

As God’s children in Jesus, we often would like life to be easy, or at least easier. But instead, we find ourselves embroiled in the midst and mess of the world, the flesh, and the devil against Christ and Christians. Not to mention the fact that we have our own issues. A basic problem for most of us would be our propensity to not trust in God, but trust instead in ourselves, or someone or something else.

God could bail us out and make life grand. And some even advocate something like that in their teaching. But scripture teaches us that God is concerned about our growth into maturity in Christ, that we would become like God’s Son. And if even Jesus learned obedience by what he suffered (Hebrews 5), mysterious thought that is, then how can we think we will be exempt from such? Scripture over and over again tells us a different story.

God as a loving Father desires the very best for his children, nothing less. To learn how to swim, we must be in the water. To learn how to live well, we have to live in the real world. And basic to that in Christ is the necessity of learning to trust in God, an unreserved trust in the heavenly Father.

God as our loving Father wants that for us. What pleases God is faith (Hebrews 11), faith in him and in his word. Our effort alone won’t because we’re ever in need of God’s grace, God’s gift to us in Jesus. Faith in God’s word, the gospel in Jesus is essential. But even that is not enough. God wants us to totally trust in him. We might trust, yet hold back. We trust God for our salvation through Christ’s person and work, his life, death and resurrection, but we don’t trust God in the practical nuts and bolts of life. God lovingly looks on, but surely grieves over us. At times there are things not even God can do. God won’t override our will. It’s up to us to trust, to trust and obey.

Something I’m learning, even late in life as it is. Better late than never. In and through Jesus.

when all seems in upheaval

Really everyday has its share of troubles, just as Jesus said (Matthew 6:34). But there are times when it seems all the more true. When there’s one problem after another, and some seem to resist any solution.

Psalm 46 is a great psalm to meditate on in the midst of difficult, troubling times. Things can seem out of hand, or this or that can really be nagging on us. God is with us, and we’re in this together, in Jesus.

What we need is what by the end the psalm gets at, and actually begins with. We need to take a deep breath and step back. Our problem is not helped by our near panic attitude, that somehow we have to fix it, or that there’s no solution. And at times we can even feel condemned for not stepping in and doing something.

But it’s best by far to refuse anything less than what God is getting at in this psalm. That doesn’t mean we don’t have our part, but our biggest part by far is simple faith. Through prayer and waiting on God we will find God’s direction for us, even in the midst of the struggle. And when we do get that answer, we need to hold on to it, even when under attack again. God is the one who saves, not us. We can trust in God completely, and rest in God’s goodness and greatness to see us through, and bring everything to a good end. In and through Jesus.

For the director of music. Of the Sons of Korah. According to alamoth. A song.

God is our refuge and strength,
an ever-present help in trouble.
Therefore we will not fear, though the earth give way
and the mountains fall into the heart of the sea,
though its waters roar and foam
and the mountains quake with their surging.

There is a river whose streams make glad the city of God,
the holy place where the Most High dwells.
God is within her, she will not fall;
God will help her at break of day.
Nations are in uproar, kingdoms fall;
he lifts his voice, the earth melts.

The Lord Almighty is with us;
the God of Jacob is our fortress.

Come and see what the Lord has done,
the desolations he has brought on the earth.
He makes wars cease
to the ends of the earth.
He breaks the bow and shatters the spear;
he burns the shields with fire.
He says, “Be still, and know that I am God;
I will be exalted among the nations,
I will be exalted in the earth.”

The Lord Almighty is with us;
the God of Jacob is our fortress.

silence is golden

The angel said to him, “I am Gabriel. I stand in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to tell you this good news.And now you will be silent and not able to speak until the day this happens, because you did not believe my words, which will come true at their appointed time.”

Luke 1:19-20

Zechariah was a priest, husband of Elizabeth. In their old age they miraculously conceived, God bringing John the Baptist into the world, who was filled with the Holy Spirit even from his mother’s womb, the one who was the forerunner of Christ, “preparing the way for the Lord.”

This story is quite interesting, good to read and ponder. Zechariah had a privilege probably relatively very few priests had, and an angel met him as he did it. One has to wonder about Zechariah’s character and personality. He and his wife were righteous in the sight of the Lord, faithful to God’s will. Maybe he was a big talker, maybe not. No doubt that he did struggle some in his faith, evident in that he didn’t simply receive the angel’s message, God’s word to him without grave misgivings and doubt. Contrast that to Mary who once she got over the idea in her humility that she could be addressed and with commendation, did accept the angel’s word with the difficulties that came with it (Luke 1:26-38).

I have found myself that when I’m intent on being quiet, that’s when I might get some wisdom from God. But when I’m intent on saying a lot, or even something, not so much, if at all. I can be full of words. Better to be quiet and listen. Then one might have something to say that’s truly worthwhile.

After Zechariah’s imposed silence when he was not able to speak for over nine months, we have what is called the Benedictus, Zechariah’s Song (Luke 1:57-80). Something surely composed during or at least because of the time of silence. To hear God’s word, we must listen. In and through Jesus.

holding on to God’s peace

Life is lived in experience. The Christian life is not an exception to that. But life is also lived in faith. We assume and basically take for granted a good number of things. And there are contingencies to be sure.

Experience is important, but it’s not what should direct us. Yet when by faith we enter into an experience of God’s peace over a certain matter, we do well to hold on to that. And hold on we will have to. I think of one of the beloved servants of God, pastors, and writers of my generation, Chuck Swindoll who said something to the effect that if we have peace about something in answer to prayer, we should never let go of that.

One element of the life of faith is that we are led by God’s peace. If we don’t have peace over something, that’s a sign that somehow we’re off track. But if we have peace about it, that’s a sign that we are in sync with God, or trusting God to take care of it.

In my life I’ve so often gotten in the way. I’m always investigating and asking questions. But there comes a point when one just needs to let go of all of that, praying and making the best decision one can, sometimes in the midst of that breaking through into something of God’s peace to go one direction or another. And then not going back on that when the inevitable doubts come. That can be a test of our faith. Are we trusting God or not? Or are we relying on ourselves and our own understanding?

Something I have to keep working on, but in recent years have grown a lot in through experience and remaining in the word and in prayer. In and through Jesus.

what would Jesus do? Jesus is with us by the Spirit

WWJD bracelets used to be worn by quite a few Christians, standing for “What would Jesus do?” That is not a bad question. And in order to try to understand at all what Jesus might do in a given situation, we must certainly be in scripture, particularly in the gospel accounts: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. And in prayer.

But something that can be missed in this endeavor is the reality that our Lord is indeed with us by the Spirit, that God is present in Jesus. As we seek to hear our Lord’s voice, we should refrain from raising our own voices, or depending on the voices of others. That certainly doesn’t mean that we don’t listen to others, and try to take everything into consideration. But it does mean along with that that we pray and seek the Lord’s voice so that we can somehow grasp something of the Lord’s mind and heart on any given situation.

As Christians, believers and followers of Christ, we are said to have the mind of Christ. But it’s another thing to live by that. Too often we’re moved by our own minds that have been shaped by others who are not necessarily being shaped or moved by God to know God’s will.

Even when we do think we may have something of the mind of Christ, we need to be humble, and realize that we probably don’t have all of it for a given matter. We know in part; we prophesy in part (1 Corinthians 13). Our part might indeed be an important contribution to knowing and sharing in the mind of Christ. We may be getting the heart of the matter completely right. But we need the contribution of others with their different gifts and experiences to contribute to the whole in that.

Something for all of us in Christ and a part of how we’re blessed to be a blessing.

2 Corinthians 7:2-16

Make room for us in your hearts. We have wronged no one, we have corrupted no one, we have exploited no one. I do not say this to condemn you; I have said before that you have such a place in our hearts that we would live or die with you. I have spoken to you with great frankness; I take great pride in you. I am greatly encouraged; in all our troubles my joy knows no bounds.

For when we came into Macedonia, we had no rest, but we were harassed at every turn—conflicts on the outside, fears within. But God, who comforts the downcast, comforted us by the coming of Titus, and not only by his coming but also by the comfort you had given him. He told us about your longing for me, your deep sorrow, your ardent concern for me, so that my joy was greater than ever.

Even if I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it. Though I did regret it—I see that my letter hurt you, but only for a little while— yet now I am happy, not because you were made sorry, but because your sorrow led you to repentance. For you became sorrowful as God intended and so were not harmed in any way by us. Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death. See what this godly sorrow has produced in you: what earnestness, what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what alarm, what longing, what concern, what readiness to see justice done. At every point you have proved yourselves to be innocent in this matter. So even though I wrote to you, it was neither on account of the one who did the wrong nor on account of the injured party, but rather that before God you could see for yourselves how devoted to us you are. By all this we are encouraged.

In addition to our own encouragement, we were especially delighted to see how happy Titus was, because his spirit has been refreshed by all of you. I had boasted to him about you, and you have not embarrassed me. But just as everything we said to you was true, so our boasting about you to Titus has proved to be true as well. And his affection for you is all the greater when he remembers that you were all obedient, receiving him with fear and trembling. I am glad I can have complete confidence in you.

2 Corinthians 7:2-16

Psalm 62

For the director of music. For Jeduthun. A psalm of David.

Truly my soul finds rest in God;
my salvation comes from him.
Truly he is my rock and my salvation;
he is my fortress, I will never be shaken.

How long will you assault me?
Would all of you throw me down—
this leaning wall, this tottering fence?
Surely they intend to topple me
from my lofty place;
they take delight in lies.
With their mouths they bless,
but in their hearts they curse.

Yes, my soul, find rest in God;
my hope comes from him.
Truly he is my rock and my salvation;
he is my fortress, I will not be shaken.
My salvation and my honor depend on God;
he is my mighty rock, my refuge.
Trust in him at all times, you people;
pour out your hearts to him,
for God is our refuge.

Surely the lowborn are but a breath,
the highborn are but a lie.
If weighed on a balance, they are nothing;
together they are only a breath.
Do not trust in extortion
or put vain hope in stolen goods;
though your riches increase,
do not set your heart on them.

One thing God has spoken,
two things I have heard:
“Power belongs to you, God,
and with you, Lord, is unfailing love”;
and, “You reward everyone
according to what they have done.”

tuning out voices contrary to the gospel

“Very truly I tell you Pharisees, anyone who does not enter the sheep pen by the gate, but climbs in by some other way, is a thief and a robber. The one who enters by the gate is the shepherd of the sheep. The gatekeeper opens the gate for him, and the sheep listen to his voice. He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. When he has brought out all his own, he goes on ahead of them, and his sheep follow him because they know his voice. But they will never follow a stranger; in fact, they will run away from him because they do not recognize a stranger’s voice.”

John 10:1-5

I am thinking today of the many discrepant voices that in one way or another can end up undermining the gospel, and drowning out the voice of the Good Shepherd.

Once you start hearing or even sensing the voice of Jesus, other voices are measured according to that, whether they are discordant, contradictory, or perhaps in harmony with his voice. But what is always needed is a hearing of the one distinct voice, which means disciplining ourselves to actually listen.

The problem is either the error of being taken up with other voices, or simply not being able to clearly hear the one voice needed. We tend to be listening to just one voice at a time as the predominating voice in our lives by which we measure all other voices. And too often it’s a voice which isn’t helpful whatsoever for our spiritual life in God through Christ.

I think I’ll be beating this drum for awhile, as I attempt to make this more a fixed practice and reality in my own life. In and through Jesus.

Psalm 100

A psalm. For giving grateful praise.

Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.
Worship the Lord with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs.
Know that the Lord is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations.

what is the prevailing voice in our lives?

My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me.

John 10:27

Jesus was talking to the Pharisees who saw themselves as the guardians of God’s tradition given to Moses, considered the same by a majority of Jews then. So people who listened to them may have been very well quite religious and faithful to the tradition they were brought up in. But according to Jesus that wasn’t enough. Of course Jesus was present and God had been on the move in a way in which the faith tradition had not anticipated or was prepared for.

But to us today: What are the prevailing voices in our lives? Or the prevailing voice? Often it’s our own voice in tune with voices of the past, often disparaging, and giving us a voice which is anything but helpful most of the time. We never measure up, and at least some of the time are worse than that. And then there are the voices in the world. Today in a near scream, certainly in rage, and it seems with ample justification at times, even if the rage itself is not good.

This gets to the heart of what I hope is a new revolution in my own life: the simple discipline, if you may, of practicing seeking to hear the Lord’s voice. Through the word, particularly while reading the gospel accounts (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John). With a sense of hearing the Lord’s voice. And with a focus set on listening for the Lord’s voice, so that my focus is not on my own voice and thoughts, nor on someone else’s.

I have found this particularly edifying the last few days. Like so many things that may seem to be revolutionary and helpful, they all tend to fade away in time, maybe leaving some kind of impact on one, but lost and gone. But this “discipline” might last as long as I can keep up the practice by God’s grace.

This can certainly help us to pray for others, to bring them to God’s throne because we’re living in response to the voice of the Lord, and not having our spiritual life drowned out by our own voice and many other voices.

But this does not shield us from struggles, pitfalls, and wrongdoing. But God’s grace is present always as we go back to this: listening to the voice of the Lord, the Good Shepherd who loves us, his sheep.