the peace Jesus gives

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.

John 14:27

Jesus was speaking to his disciples on the eve of his crucifixion, and just before the agony he endured in the Garden of Gethsemane. And it was wonderful to hear surely, even with the shock that had likely settled in with the disciples. Or maybe more like falling on rather deaf ears, since their hearts were a thousand miles from peace. I know all about that; I’ve been there, done that most all of my life.

It is wonderful that we have so many words preserved from our Lord’s Upper Room Discourse, as it’s called, from John’s gospel, along with his washing of the disciples’ feet, not to mention his “high priestly” prayer in closing (John 13-17).

There is nothing like having the Lord’s peace. It doesn’t mean that we have peace not to face reality. It does mean that in the midst of it all, Jesus gives us no less than his very own peace. Note that Jesus gives it. And because of that, we’re to not let our hearts be troubled or afraid.

Of course emotions come and go. The peace the Lord gives certainly does have to do with our emotions, but it’s more than that. It’s the general sense of well being, and a settled disposition from faith, which means that even when we don’t feel it, it’s there. Nevertheless, it is good when we do feel peace, akin to the peace of God going beyond all of our understanding and guarding our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus (Philippians 4:6-7).

Jesus knew that his disciples would begin to fully appreciate his words only after Pentecost, after the Holy Spirit would come. Jesus even talked some about that during this discourse (John 14:15-31; 15:26-16:15).

The bottom would drop out shortly after this, for the disciples. They would all fall away to some extent, as Jesus told them, because of their own weakness. In their hearts they were ready to lay their lives down for the Lord, but they were not spiritually fit to the place where they could do so. That would take the emboldening power of Pentecost, the filling of the Holy Spirit and grace of God on them, Jesus’s presence in that. And with that, the peace Jesus gives. In and through him.

 

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