what difference are we Christians suppose to make?

I wonder how we Christians who don’t always agree on political issues, nevertheless might be a mediating, healing, even redemptive influence on a nation being torn apart. I am reminded of Jeremiah’s letter to the exiles in Babylon (Jeremiah 29). They were to settle down and seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which they were exiled, to pray for it. It was going to be temporary for sure, seventy years.

That reminds me of us Christians here in the United States, or in any nation in the world, for that matter. We are temporary here, yes citizens of these nations, but our primary citizenship is in heaven. We don’t exist for the good of any nation or government. But we do wish the best for them, for God’s blessing so that people might be blessed. Government and the state does have a God-given place in this world (Romans 13).

I think the more we take all the words of Scripture seriously, especially those directed to the church, the more we might be helpful in the current impasse and worse. The gospel, God’s good news from God actually does the work, we don’t. We are witnesses to it in how we live in deed and word. First of all by our lives, even if we say nothing more at all.

…make it your ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.

1 Thessalonians 4:11-12

Note the passage (click link) is in the context of an emphasis on love for each other, so that Christians strictly speaking are not independent, but dependent on God, and interdependent (not codependent) on each other. We Christians are in this together. Even when we don’t agree politically. We might be poles apart that way. And unlike me, you may not see climate change as something serious to consider, and we may disagree on a whole host of issues, even including the history of the United States.

In spite of all of that, just how can we be the mediating, healing, and even redemptive presence needed, if we think there’s value in that. If there was value in captive Israel being a blessing to Babylon, then surely there is for us now.

Getting back to Jeremiah’s letter to those exiles, we need to listen to what it might be telling us today:

…seek the peace and prosperity of the city to which I have carried you into exile. Pray to the Lord for it, because if it prospers, you too will prosper.

Jeremiah 29:7

Prayer. If there’s nothing else we do, we should pray. Even shut our mouths and instead, pray. Not that there’s never a time to speak, as well as be silent (Ecclesiastes 3:7b). But there’s nothing better we can do than pray. When we do, we’ll find ourselves somehow in God’s working, what God alone can do. What we do apart from prayer and dependence on God will do more harm than whatever good it might do. We can be sure of that, as well.

And so on the eve of Independence Day here in the United States, let’s consider carefully just how we might be a blessing in the midst of a mess which is certainly well beyond us. Above all holding on to the faith of the gospel, lights to the world (Philippians 2:14-16) in and through Jesus.