a life of prayer

Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.

Colossians 4:2

I have always found the idea of continued ongoing prayer fascinating. There are “prayer warriors,” people given to prayer. Scripture indicates there’s a spiritual potency in that, especially when God’s people do it together. But also with individuals who had a special calling or closeness to God. I once heard of a monastery which basically is devoted to prayer. Those involved pray for the world: for nations, for the church, etc.

It seems to me that given my life circumstances and what I see around me, God is calling me to a life of prayer. I’m not sure exactly what that looks like given my busy enough schedule. Lots of dead ends in life and other activities which can fill up one’s time cram my day along with what I have to do. So I’ve decided to step back and try to learn and step into a life of prayer.

When it comes to prayer, I think God has helped me come a long way. But I also know that I have a long way to go. All too often I can be relatively prayerless, or seem to be running on empty when it comes to prayer. I’ve heard it said that when praying seems most difficult, we should pray all the more. I find it all too easy not to pray at all, or at the most, very little. There are rare times when I feel like praying, when it seems so evident that the Spirit is giving me the push, desire, and love to pray. So I try to really take advantage of that in prayer for others and about ongoing concerns.  But by and large day after day I have to plod along in what can seem to be mundane prayer, though by faith I know better. I believe in praying when it seems empty. Yet I long to grow in my prayer life.

So along with being in the word throughout the day, I want to be in prayer. Devoted to prayer, as the above text tells us. Watching for God’s answers and moving, and expressing thanks for such. In and through Jesus.

Mark 8:22-26

They came to Bethsaida, and some people brought a blind man and begged Jesus to touch him. He took the blind man by the hand and led him outside the village. When he had spit on the man’s eyes and put his hands on him, Jesus asked, “Do you see anything?”

He looked up and said, “I see people; they look like trees walking around.”

Once more Jesus put his hands on the man’s eyes. Then his eyes were opened, his sight was restored, and he saw everything clearly. Jesus sent him home, saying, “Don’t even go into the village.”

Mark 8:22-26

dealing with the troubles of life one day at a time

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Matthew 6:34

Jesus’s words here have to be taken in context. He is talking about both avoiding the love of money, and trusting completely in the Father’s provision as one is seeking first God’s kingdom and righteousness with the promise that all of one’s needs will be met.

Go to the most wealthy. They too will die, and it’s not as if their lives are free of problems, or even that money will get themselves out of any and every trouble. It is true that plenty of money helps mitigate a host of problems and that the rich should be sensitive to the poor whose resources are sometimes not enough to get them through adversity. All of this is surely part of what Jesus is getting at, considering all he says here and elsewhere, and all Scripture tells us.

To the words quoted above: Jesus is making a point. He is certainly not telling anyone to not plan for the future. That would contradict other Scripture, and Jesus is not going to do that. The point is that in our trust of the Father, we deal with what is in front of us today. We have responsibilities and tasks and likely some either lingering or new problem to deal with today. Tomorrow will bring on some new situation, entirely out of our view now. We’re not to fret about yesterday or tomorrow, but deal with today and the task at hand.

The thought on trouble is a helpful one. Christians, followers of Jesus are not set free from trouble of any and every kind. We’re set up for disillusionment to think otherwise. It is helpful for us to accept all of that as a part of this life. And hold on to the truth that God is faithful in all of it, and will see us through to the end, even through death itself.

So we can deal with the problems today without preconceived notions as to how everything must turn out. Instead accepting what comes our way with the consequences. As we learn to trust our Father more and more in and through Jesus.

 

the gospel is what we’re to be living out, as well as witnesses to

We are not going too far in our boasting, as would be the case if we had not come to you, for we did get as far as you with the gospel of Christ. Neither do we go beyond our limits by boasting of work done by others. Our hope is that, as your faith continues to grow, our sphere of activity among you will greatly expand, so that we can preach the gospel in the regions beyond you.

2 Corinthians 10:14-16a

What seems beside the point in Paul’s addressing of his concern in passing, but really is at the heart of the point is what he was all about: not self-aggrandizement or self-glory, but only and always about the gospel of Christ.

Paul is getting after those who were set in opposition to him, claiming apostleship for themselves perhaps because they found themselves in opposition to Paul and somehow thought they could do better, or more likely out of an underlying self-ambition with a professed belief in Christ. But Paul wasn’t about self-ambition in the least, but again- only and always about Christ and Christ’s gospel.

Sometimes we may not feel we have anything to offer to others, or at least not anything they would accept. After all, people look at another according to their status, what they’ve achieved in life, or whether that other is beneficial to them, not to mention whether it all seems relevant or jives with them.

Paul was concerned about none of that, because the gospel is inherently weak and foolish in the world’s eyes, just as he had told them in his first letter to the Corinthian church. God takes the weak and despised and nothing things as his instruments to help others. The gospel is not only to be proclaimed, but lived out by those who proclaim it. Christ’s weakness in his death on the cross is to be embraced by his followers, that they might know God’s resurrection power in Christ. When we are strong in ourselves, then the only help people will get is what help we can give them, not God’s help.

And so we must continue on no matter what we’re facing or going through. Believing and knowing that we are on course only in the weakness of Christ for the good news that will bring others into the power and blessing of God. In and through Jesus.

holding on to progress in the faith

Only let us live up to what we have already attained.

Philippians 3:16

Paul is referring to the high call of God in Christ Jesus. A cross-shaped life for sure as we see in the passage itself (click above link). All that is contrary to that is to be considered as nothing more than garbage.

It is wonderful to receive insight and make significant changes. And then it may seem that you’re at a new level, which actually may well be the case. But it is remarkable and disconcerting how almost invariably over time one not only can, but will drift back into the old attitudes or actions.

So Paul’s words here are helpful. They shouldn’t be isolated from their context, but still need to be considered carefully. The emphasis is on how we live. And the context for that is the entire book of Philippians, and for that matter we can say the entire Bible, according to the gospel which is its ultimate focus and fulfillment.

There’s no doubt that once we’ve stepped into a new light and air, it is egregious to us to drift back into the old. We can be sure that all of our advances will be challenged by Satan, and we can say, tested by God. Are we committed to the new course come what may? Or will we yield to the temptation to go back to our old ways?

We need to hold on to what we’ve attained, live up to that. That is part of pursuing the high calling of God in and through Christ Jesus.

don’t be anxious

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

If there isn’t one thing to be anxious or worried in this life, there’s another, and plenty others. There’s really no end to the number of things we can be upset over or worried about. Some are more prone to worry than others. There are people who seem to take life in stride, everything in stride, though often enough, if you would really get to know them, underlying that appearance is a cloud of anxiety within.

Remarkably believers in Christ are told not to be anxious about anything. Though it’s imperative tense, I take it to be more of loving directive as from a father. But it does come across as an absolute with a promise.

I have found over and over again as I do this in my own broken, disheveled way, but sincerely do it, God does in time meet me with his peace, a peace here which is experiential, guarding our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus. Of course not just not being anxious, but praying with petitions and thanksgiving.

God has it all in tow. We don’t and cannot. We can rest assured in God’s provision for us regardless of what circumstance we’re facing. God’s peace will see us through that and everything else. In and through Jesus.

 

sensitivity to wrong in our lives

Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says. Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like someone who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like. But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it—not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it—they will be blessed in what they do.

James 1:22-25

We are told in this passage that we need to look intently at God’s word and at ourselves. An implication in this passage is that God’s written word exposes what is wrong in our lives, and that by application of that word, we can change and see change over time.

It’s important not only to be encouraged by God’s word, but also to be open and sensitive to whatever is wrong in our life, in our heart and actions. Jesus said that what defiles a person comes from the heart, and Proverbs tells us to watch over our heart since all we do comes from it.

We need the help from God through his word to address our problem. And we have to be sensitive to what is wrong with us. It is remarkable how quick we can be to pick up and pick on the perceived faults of others and be oblivious of our own. Or simply to sweep our own faults under the rug as insignificant or somehow justified, or we can fail to see them at all. As Scripture tells us elsewhere, we who judge others do the very same things ourselves.

Yes, others certainly have their faults sometimes in plain sight for all to see, though only God can see their hearts. But we have to acknowledge to ourselves that we’re in the same boat, that we’re often wrong, and keep our attention first and foremost on ourselves. As we continue in the word, making the necessary changes along the way. In and through Jesus.