restoration from sufferings

All of you, clothe yourselves with humility toward one another, because,

“God opposes the proud
but shows favor to the humble.”[a]

Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.

Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. Resist him, standing firm in the faith, because you know that the family of believers throughout the world is undergoing the same kind of sufferings.

And the God of all grace, who called you to his eternal glory in Christ, after you have suffered a little while, will himself restore you and make you strong, firm and steadfast. To him be the power for ever and ever. Amen.

1 Peter 5:5b-11

This passage considered in itself would lose sight of the context of the letter. The suffering mentioned here is persecution for Christ and for righteousness. The entire letter should be read and even reread to understand the setting. Not to say that there aren’t other applications, I would call them secondary, when passages are read out of context.

We should ask ourselves if our suffering is really because of our witness to Christ and living in harmony with that. Or for something else, maybe of our own misdoing. Unfortunately, and I speak for myself, the majority of suffering can be due to wrongdoing, just plain ordinary sin. Little if any do we suffer because of our witness to Christ, not here in the United States.

This passage is quite encouraging and equally challenging. What we need is God’s grace; all is grace. But it’s a grace to see us through in the way of Christ, not in our own way. It involves humility toward each other and above all toward God. With the promise that as we cast our cares on God and resist the devil that God will see us through. Along with all other believers who are undergoing the same sufferings.

We who experience little of this suffering ought to stand with those who do suffer, doing what we can to help. We can and therefore should begin with prayer. Then we can go from there.

At the same time receiving the grace we too need in whatever situation we find ourselves. In and through Jesus.

our suffering for Christ, part of God’s good work?

Dear friends, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal that has come on you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice inasmuch as you participate in the sufferings of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed. If you are insulted because of the name of Christ, you are blessed, for the Spirit of glory and of God rests on you. If you suffer, it should not be as a murderer or thief or any other kind of criminal, or even as a meddler. However, if you suffer as a Christian, do not be ashamed, but praise God that you bear that name. For it is time for judgment to begin with God’s household; and if it begins with us, what will the outcome be for those who do not obey the gospel of God? And,

“If it is hard for the righteous to be saved,
what will become of the ungodly and the sinner?”[a]

So then, those who suffer according to God’s will should commit themselves to their faithful Creator and continue to do good.

1 Peter 4:12-19

During the days of Jesus’ life on earth, he offered up prayers and petitions with fervent cries and tears to the one who could save him from death, and he was heard because of his reverent submission. Son though he was, he learned obedience from what he suffered and, once made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him and was designated by God to be high priest in the order of Melchizedek.

Hebrews 5:7-10

I was noting I think for the first time the strange (to me) connection Peter makes between Christian suffering and God’s judgment. Seems like there’s a connection there. And we could possibly tie that to Christ’s own suffering as mentioned in the book of Hebrews, how he actually somehow “learned obedience” in such. Once made perfect might refer to his accomplishment of our salvation by his death.

We need to stare the hard sayings of Scripture directly in the face and remain there. This is not at all diminishing God’s love, not in the least. It is pointing to what we actually need as those who are being restored into what God meant for us in the first place, now through the new creation in Jesus.

On the other hand, the passage from 1 Peter quoted above might simply mean that the judgment from God is to separate those who suffer for doing ill from those who suffer for doing good and because of their witness for Christ. That well could be the meaning.

I find it interesting to see some possible link between what God is doing and what God did with Jesus, if we understand either very well. Either way, we can be sure that God is at work in our lives to help us be ready for whatever persecution we may have to endure. In and through Jesus.

 

do we suffer for the Name?

Dear friends, do not be surprised at the fiery ordeal that has come on you to test you, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice inasmuch as you participate in the sufferings of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed. If you are insulted because of the name of Christ, you are blessed, for the Spirit of glory and of God rests on you. If you suffer, it should not be as a murderer or thief or any other kind of criminal, or even as a meddler. However, if you suffer as a Christian, do not be ashamed, but praise God that you bear that name. For it is time for judgment to begin with God’s household; and if it begins with us, what will the outcome be for those who do not obey the gospel of God? And,

“If it is hard for the righteous to be saved,
what will become of the ungodly and the sinner?”[a]

So then, those who suffer according to God’s will should commit themselves to their faithful Creator and continue to do good.

1 Peter 4:12-19

I’ve been impressed in going over 1 Peter this time the prominence suffering in the sense of being persecuted for Christ has. Most often our suffering is due to our own faults or sometimes the problems of others. It seems most rare that we’re actually suffering for the name of Christ.

I know there are more than a few Christians nowadays where I live (the United States) who think they’re suffering for Christ. In most cases I would beg to differ. At least not when you consider this letter (1 Peter) and church history. And start considering the world scene today, the many Christians who are undergoing persecution.

Just to simply draw near to Christ, to be faithful to him might draw some persecution here, although most of us where I live will never find our lives in jeopardy over our witness.

1 Peter doesn’t mince words or try to make it sound easy. The mark of a Christian is to suffer for Christ, and thus to be in participation with the sufferings of Christ. It makes me wonder about myself. Not that we’re to look for persecution, but are we ready to suffer for Christ if that time ever comes?

1 Peter seems like an austere book when you consider the theme of suffering etched in it. Surely not one of the most popular books of the Bible, except for the verse or two you’ll find tucked away in precious promise books. But needed for our full development into Christian maturity. In and through Jesus.

suffering for righteousness

…it is commendable if someone bears up under the pain of unjust suffering because they are conscious of God. But how is it to your credit if you receive a beating for doing wrong and endure it? But if you suffer for doing good and you endure it, this is commendable before God. To this you were called, because Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example, that you should follow in his steps.

“He committed no sin,
and no deceit was found in his mouth.”[a]

When they hurled their insults at him, he did not retaliate; when he suffered, he made no threats. Instead, he entrusted himself to him who judges justly. “He himself bore our sins” in his body on the cross, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; “by his wounds you have been healed.” For “you were like sheep going astray,”[b] but now you have returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls.

1 Peter 2:19-25

I think we can gather from this passage that our suffering in this world for righteousness can be redemptive. Christ’s suffering as stated here, certainly was. Ours can be only as a witness to Christ’s suffering for the redemption of the world. But it must be suffering in the way of Christ, as Christ suffered.

Too often our suffering is something we brought on ourselves through some fault of our own. Instead we need to hold firm and seek to live in the way of Christ, and be ready to suffer. This book, 1 Peter talks about this quite a bit. Evidently the ones to whom Peter was writing were suffering quite a lot, likely at the hands of their own people. So Peter as a pastor was seeking to encourage and strengthen them.

This passage ends on a note we should end on here. It’s not about us and our suffering, as important in its place as that is. It’s about what Christ has suffered for us, certainly as an example, but also for our sins and for the good of our souls, our lives in this life and the next. So we suffer like Christ did from that salvation if we have the honor. In and through Jesus.

our humble, faithful witness

Dear friends, I urge you, as foreigners and exiles, to abstain from sinful desires, which wage war against your soul. Live such good lives among the pagans that, though they accuse you of doing wrong, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day he visits us.

1 Peter 2:11-12

It is important to be faithful day after day. I did not say perfect, but faithful. None of us is perfect; we’re not going to realize that in this life. But we’re to be faithful, which includes plugging away in what we have to do every day and doing so in a way that is a witness to those around us. That will include repentance on our part along the way, and growth in grace, as we seek to love others because of God’s love for us, and our love for God in return, in Christ.

I have found this to be powerfully and wonderfully true in my own experience. God can work wonders even through us, in spite of and perhaps even through our imperfection, but honest attempt to remain faithful. We want to be pleasing to God and a blessing to others. That is our goal. And God will help us as we continue on day after day. In and through Jesus.

Mark 10:32-34

They were on their way up to Jerusalem, with Jesus leading the way, and the disciples were astonished, while those who followed were afraid. Again he took the Twelve aside and told them what was going to happen to him. “We are going up to Jerusalem,” he said, “and the Son of Man will be delivered over to the chief priests and the teachers of the law. They will condemn him to death and will hand him over to the Gentiles, who will mock him and spit on him, flog him and kill him. Three days later he will rise.”

Mark 10:32-34

worldly thinking

Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.

Romans 12:1-2

When we convert to Christ, we are under a new rule, and with that comes a new orientation to life. We can no longer see anything the same way we did before. However with that new reality comes the ongoing necessity to continue to change in that difference, or else drift back into the thinking we had before our conversion. There’s nothing in between. We’re either on course, or we’re drifting; we’re either conforming to the pattern of this world, or we’re being transformed by the renewing of our minds.

We should be aware of this in light of everything: family, business, politics, whatever. Anything and everything is under Christ’s rule for us. That has to make all the difference in how we look at everything, or it will make no difference at all. In and through Jesus.

 

 

slow down

Related to my thoughts yesterday I think, I want to simply say here that we need to slow down and quit trying to take in big chunks of spiritual food. Instead we need to chew on each morsel, and take things in slowly. And then respond prayerfully, thoughtfully and not be in a hurry.

This certainly doesn’t exclude reading (and/or listening) through the Bible, say like in a year, more or less. That too has its importance and value for sure. We do need to see the big picture, and not just dwell on this or that detail. When we stick to even the “precious promises” as important as they are, our default paradigm is often in place rather than God’s story. So yes, we need to work at getting the big picture. That takes time, something we can’t rush through and get overnight.

But again, the point of this post is that we need to slowly process things, as we engage God in the written word. One thought at a time, one phrase, maybe even one word at a time. Not losing sight of the context, and continuing to go on. But taking our time, or maybe stopping to consider. And never being in a hurry. Slowing down to take in all God has for us, being the goal. In and through Jesus.

one step at a time

It seems like many want something like an instant spirituality, or great leaps into a new experience which completely changes everything or more like one’s experience of everything.

The Bible certainly doesn’t exclude spiritual breakthroughs like Saul/Paul’s Damascus Road experience. But one will find out after a season of being on the mountaintop, that most of life is lived out in the valley. One will have to learn to walk with God through thick and thin, depending on the Spirit. In and through Jesus.

growing up in one’s salvation

Therefore, rid yourselves of all malice and all deceit, hypocrisy, envy, and slander of every kind. Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation, now that you have tasted that the Lord is good.

1 Peter 2:1-3

Aside from the question of precisely how to translate it, and exactly what it means, I was captured yesterday by this rendering in the NIV, “you may grow up in your salvation.” It could mean growing until one’s salvation is completed at Christ’s return, given what this letter says earlier. The idea is of babies growing or growing up to salvation, perhaps into that salvation. Whatever precisely this means, for me the idea as translated above begs the question just what growing up in one’s salvation might mean.

It’s always best to stay in the same book/letter when asking such questions, before scoping out beyond, and then to do so in similar book, like say, 2 Peter, and then beyond.

Salvation like sin has almost become a despised and therefore neglected word. It has been hijacked by “easy believism” and what Dallas Willard called “bar code Christianity,” in which salvation doesn’t mean much more than getting a one way ticket to heaven. But biblically speaking, it means so much more.

Salvation in the New Testament is past, present and future. All three have ramifications in what’s being said here. Because of God’s work in Christ, the Spirit shields us in the present in and for the salvation that is to come when Christ returns.

And that salvation is always from something to something else. From our sins, who we were before Christ, to the new person we’re becoming in Christ. All kinds of details are involved in that, as one can see from the passage above. It’s definitely a work in progress. Certainly we can say toward Christ-likeness and full maturity in Christ.

To be a part of our everyday lives now. In and through Jesus.