ending well

For I am already being poured out like a drink offering, and the time for my departure is near. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day—and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.

2 Timothy 4:6-8

None of us should compare ourselves with the Apostle Paul, and I don’t belong with him in the same breath at all, of course. But Paul’s words here does seem to include all the rest of us, when you see how they end. And we are told elsewhere to follow his example as he follows Christ. So we can find solace and hope there.

Like Paul, then, we can live out our lives for Christ, for others, even for our enemies, and through the most difficult of times fully. Akin to “being poured out like a drink offering” to God. Realizing that we indeed are in a fight, the good fight, elsewhere the good fight of the faith. That we are in a race no less. And that we’re to keep or hold on to the faith.

I think it’s as simple as that. We’re not to be Apostle Pauls going everywhere preaching the gospel, planting churches, etc. But we’re to be what God has called each one of us individually to be within the community of faith. We simply need to be a light in the way God purposes for us as individuals with all the other lights. When you look at the rest of Paul’s letters, that will be evident.

We want things to be better now, but we long for Christ’s appearing when what’s wrong will be judged, and all the wrongs set right. And when the new will be completely present. Something we begin to taste now, which whets our appetites. In a way we can’t wait. But we settle in now, wanting to end well. To finish like Paul did. May God grant that. In and through Jesus.

2 comments on “ending well

  1. James Ernest says:

    This verse has been on my mind recently also, Ted. While critical NT scholars don’t think this letter was written by the same person as Galatians and Romans, most conservatives and evangelicals do; and yet they leave them out of their reckoning of Paul’s teaching on the Christian life. They think Paul told them all they have to do is believe something, without doing anything, and they’ll be OK. But Paul himself, according to this passage, thinks that the fact that he has fought the good fight and finished the race, pouring out his life in the process rather than just believing that Jesus paid it all, has something to do with his expectation of a garland or righteousness. He strongly implies that “longing for his appearance” means doing something–something rather strenuous and difficult.

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