Good Friday was the darkest Friday

About three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”).

Matthew 22:46

Taken from Psalm 22, Jesus’s cry on the cross had to ring strangely in Jewish ears. Jesus hanging their likely naked in full sight of all, actually at ground level just outside the city, and with the suffering, and immense agony of prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane just prior to this, we have to try to appreciate the sufferings of our Savior.

Our Evangelical Christian tradition often emphasizes the truth of Christ’s finished work through his death on the cross for the forgiveness of our sins spoken of in the book of Hebrews and elsewhere. And echoed in Jesus’s words on the cross recorded in John’s gospel, “It is finished”, if his words there are interpreted to mean or include that. That is all well and good and true.

But we need to take some time to dwell some on Christ’s sufferings. We have a glimpse of them in the gospel accounts, echoes from the psalms. And the spiritual darkness evident here was apparent in the darkness when either an eclipse of the sun occurred with heavy clouds, or at least a dark overcast sky.

Yes Good Friday was the darkest Friday of all. But through that day, all the hosts of spiritual darkness are put in their place, to be ultimately vanquished. A terrible day, yes. And we should hold that note and pause. But ultimately a glorious day, proven some hours later.

 

 

Jesus’s crucifixion and death

On this Good Friday we remember our Lord’s crucifixion and death. We bow at the mystery while accepting the truth from Scripture that by his death he broke the power of death. That he died for us in our place taking on himself our just condemnation. That the worst evil we heap on God and others he then received to bring us into God’s best for us: participation in God’s life and love. That God was reconciling the world to himself in the death of his Son, that all might receive forgiveness of sins and new life in Jesus.

A certain man from Cyrene, Simon, the father of Alexander and Rufus, was passing by on his way in from the country, and they forced him to carry the cross. They brought Jesus to the place called Golgotha (which means “the place of the skull”). Then they offered him wine mixed with myrrh, but he did not take it. And they crucified him. Dividing up his clothes, they cast lots to see what each would get.

It was nine in the morning when they crucified him. The written notice of the charge against him read: the king of the Jews.

They crucified two rebels with him, one on his right and one on his left. Those who passed by hurled insults at him, shaking their heads and saying, “So! You who are going to destroy the temple and build it in three days, come down from the cross and save yourself!” In the same way the chief priests and the teachers of the law mocked him among themselves. “He saved others,” they said, “but he can’t save himself! Let this Messiah, this king of Israel, come down now from the cross, that we may see and believe.” Those crucified with him also heaped insults on him.

At noon, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon.And at three in the afternoon Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?” (which means “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”).

When some of those standing near heard this, they said, “Listen, he’s calling Elijah.”

Someone ran, filled a sponge with wine vinegar, put it on a staff, and offered it to Jesus to drink. “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to take him down,” he said.

With a loud cry, Jesus breathed his last.

The curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. And when the centurion, who stood there in front of Jesus, saw how he died, he said, “Surely this man was the Son of God!”

Some women were watching from a distance. Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joseph, and Salome. In Galilee these women had followed him and cared for his needs. Many other women who had come up with him to Jerusalem were also there.

Mark 15:21-41