the foundation of the reality in which we live

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead…

1 Peter 1

I recently wrote about how faith is not psychological, but embedded in reality, and how this is a breakthrough for me. I was certainly referring to reality, but in terms of spiritual, and actually, the result of what happened materially, as well as spiritually: Jesus’s resurrection from the dead.

The main point of this post is that Jesus actually rose from the dead into a new state of spiritual, material embodiment. Our faith is grounded in Christ’s resurrection, after he had died for our sins. Paul said that if the resurrection of Jesus is untrue, than our faith is worthless (1 Corinthians 15). For skeptics who want proof, the four gospel accounts weighed together: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, have pushed many a doubter or skeptic into acceptance of the possibility, and probability. And into belief of the same, which can lead to a living faith.

Our faith in Jesus is based on what happened in history with many eyewitnesses who saw him, and knew that while he still shared in their humanity, there was something markedly different. They knew he had died, and was buried, and lo and behold, that he was now alive, breaking bread with them, eating fish, but also disappearing before their very eyes. Not a ghost, since he indeed had flesh and bone. But somehow not a mortal any longer, either.

Christ’s resurrection is the beginning of God’s new creation into which all who have faith in Christ, all who are in Christ partake. To be fully experienced of course, at the resurrection when all things are made new. But begun now even in this life, even during the days of our humiliation as mortals here on earth. By faith we hope in the sense of anticipation in God’s promise of the new world to come, the Spirit within us being the guarantee, and assurance of what’s to come for us as God’s children, as well as for all creation. In and through Jesus.

Jesus’s resurrection: the beginning of the new creation

The nuts and bolts of scripture are so important, and where we live, but we also need to step back and take a look at the whole. And get a breathtaking sweep of what’s going on. Or try to get some sense of that. If we don’t, we may too easily miss the point of it all. Yet it’s something that we need to keep working at. Which is why we need to be in all of scripture, as well as in each part of it, especially noting some of the places of beauty and grandeur such as Romans 8, Isaiah 40 and 53, etc., along with many beautiful scenes along the way. Not to mention a good number of difficult ones as well. Such is life. And we need to pay attention to life. And know that God will show up in unusual, unexpected ways in some of its most difficult, and to us, unlikely places.

But having just celebrated Easter yesterday, remembering Jesus’s resurrection day, we now enter into, what’s called on the Christian calendar, Eastertide, or Easter season. Since we’re no longer a part of a church which observes the Christian calendar, except for the big holy days such as Christmas and Easter, I won’t dwell much on tradition. Just to say that those practices can help us center on the gospel, which in the case of the resurrection is about a new life which begins now through faith in Christ (and baptism, see the New Testament; although it’s symbolic, it seems to be a symbolism which helps us appreciate and perhaps enter more fully into the reality: note Romans 6 and elsewhere).

As C. S. Lewis indicated in his classic, The Great Divorce, “Heaven”, as we call it, is not going to be something more mystical, but actually more material and solid than what we know now, so that if we were to step into the new heaven and new earth without the change to come in the resurrection, we wouldn’t be able to endure it. Heaven coming down to earth and becoming one, is central to the new creation in Jesus which begins at his resurrection (N. T. Wright), so that the new creation in Jesus begins there, he being the firstfruits of those to be raised from the dead, who have fallen asleep in death (1 Corinthians 15).

And this new creation in Jesus does not just include the resurrection of our bodies, but the resurrection and renewal of all things, actually a brand new creation, making all things new. The God who created all things, can make a brand new creation, one not subject to the physics and destiny of this old creation. Just as Jesus’s body was not subject to the limitations our bodies have now, or for that matter his body had before his resurrection, so the material world will then be different. I think there will be those who carry on the work of science during that time. They will be just as astounded as now, probably all the more. There will be an endless amount of worlds to explore, discoveries to be made.

But what does all of that matter for us now? At the end of 1 Corinthians 15, Paul nails it down with the point that since the resurrection of Christ and all that follows is true, then we’re to give ourselves fully to his work, knowing that’s it’s not in vain.

Therefore, my dear brothers and sisters, stand firm. Let nothing move you. Always give yourselves fully to the work of the Lord, because you know that your labor in the Lord is not in vain.

As N. T. Wright suggests, the tie is surely to what preceded it, the point of the resurrection. Otherwise, as the same passage says, we might as well eat and drink and be merry, live it up now, because tomorrow we die, so that there’s no point in thinking what we do now matters beyond this life. But beside the point that it can actually matter greatly for better or for worse in this life, we need to remember and hold on to the truth that somehow in Jesus what happens in this old creation impacts what will be true in the new creation. The subtleties of that, how it will be worked out remain to be seen. We just have to believe it to be the case, so that on the basis of Christ’s resurrection we know that what we do now in him does matter. Not only for this life, but also for the life to come. In and through Jesus.