be attentive

What is God teaching me, or trying to teach me? A good question to ask. Better, just part of what we need to be attentive to.

We need to be in the word, in prayer, and pay attention to life, and to ourselves. We especially need to check our attitudes, and keep a tight rein on our actions, especially what we say.

What is God teaching me? We probably have to look no further than the nose on our face. What about ourselves is wrong? What can we do better? What should we quit doing altogether?

In and through Jesus.

the quiet openness God wants

My dear brothers and sisters, take note of this: Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, because human anger does not produce the righteousness that God desires.

James 1:19-20

If there’s a time Christians need to listen, and I’m especially thinking of myself, as a white who has lived in the evangelical tradition more than less, all of my life, it’s now. We have so much to learn.

Of course our minds will gravitate to politics, and we might think, yes, we all do, but the other side has much more to learn. I think of the rest of the passage quoted above, and how we might like to move on to the next part (click above link) to confirm our own bias. But if we read what follows correctly, no such confirmation would be coming for any one of us.

We can be in a learning mode, from God, and yes, from others. Dietrich Bonhoeffer said that if we don’t listen well to others, we’re not listening well to God either. I think he’s right. We need God’s discernment for sure. And our take should be primarily with reference to what God may be saying to us. That requires being in the word, and seeking to discern what the Spirit has said (yes, tradition) and is saying to the churches. Not just to us individually, but to all of us together.

Our anger will short circuit all of this. So we need to avoid that, insofar as possible. Yes, anger has its place, but it needs to be short lived if we’re to live the life God has for us,  a life of listening to what God might be telling us through others, as well as through his word, yes, even during these difficult times. In and through Jesus.

 

 

listen up

The LORD came and stood there, calling as at the other times, “Samuel! Samuel!”

Then Samuel said, “Speak, for your servant is listening.”

And the LORD said to Samuel: “See, I am about to do something in Israel that will make the ears of everyone who hears about it tingle.

1 Samuel 3:10-11

One of the essentials if we’re to truly be followers of the Lord is to develop a keen awareness of his voice. We need to listen and we need the discernment that comes from the Spirit of God to understand. In fact of course we need God to open our ears in the first place.

The boy Samuel needed the priest Eli’s help to set himself to listen for God’s voice, or in this case discern since Samuel had earlier heard the voice calling him. I think we best hear God’s voice in the midst of life as we remain in God’s word, Scripture. God speaks to us through the Book and directly.

Our regular hearing should improve dramatically when we take the attitude of a servant. We aspire as those who would be the Lord’s servant. Our goal is obedience to God. But even more basic is our desire to commune and thus to know and walk faithfully with God.

God’s grace is key in all of this. We may think God will no longer speak to us when we either mess up or have attitudes that are wrong or at least questionable. In reality I think it’s accurate to say the Lord is always speaking. But whether we’re keen to listen is the question. In and through Jesus.

one thing needed: simplify, personal, but not private

As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”

“Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one.[a] Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”

Luke 10:38-42

I’m not sure which one I identify with the most: Martha, or Mary. I aspire to being a one thing kind of person like Mary was. Yet I find life is filled with so many responsibilities, and I can’t let up on any of them. Maybe this variant reading which was originally in the TNIV, but is in few other translations has merit, not only from a consideration of the manuscripts (see the NET note on Luke 10:42), but from other considerations.

Regardless, I think it’s imperative to try to simplify life as much as possible. With one goal in mind: learning to sit at Jesus’s feet and take in his words, and let them soak in. The equivalent to that today might be one’s quiet time. “Personal devotions” has taken a beating, but maybe we miss a lot by not trying to have a “quiet time” that is personal between us and the Lord. Individualism is one thing, something we should avoid, but personal another, which God wants for us all.

What has to be guarded against is the notion that it’s all about us and the Lord. It’s actually all about God’s good will in Jesus, yes for us, and for everyone else. While it should be deeply personal, it is never to be private, either, or else it’s not following the Jesus of scripture, so that it’s not actually following our Lord.

But I want to simplify all the more in the way Jesus commends here. Sitting at the Lord’s feet, so to speak, and letting his words soak into my heart and mind so as to impact my life. Something I believe I need.