tell it to the Lord

Over and over in the psalms you see the psalmists speaking to themselves and to God. And we know the psalms aren’t always nice. The psalmist is pouring out his/her heart to God, telling God their troubles and their unvarnished thoughts and feelings in the struggle.

We need humans no doubt, to speak with, listen to, and sometimes receive counsel from. Sometimes we might even need a special professional counselor to help us along the way, be it a psychologist or psychiatrist. There should never be an ounce of shame in that.

But do we realize we can talk to the Lord? To the Father through the Son by the Spirit. To Jesus or the Father. Even to the Spirit, though in Scripture the Spirit seems to help us in prayer. Let him know about it all? Bring every detail of life, all our thoughts to him? Do we really believe that? As Christians we might pay lip service to it, say, “Yeah, that’s true.” But isn’t it all too rarely practiced? At least I can ask that to myself looking at my own life, and say sadly, “Yes.”

Tell it to the Lord. It doesn’t matter what it is, tell it to him. Jesus will listen, give us that sense that he is indeed listening. And we’ll get the help in our spirits that we need. To carry on hopefully better. To keep learning wisdom. Which means to learn more and more to follow the way of Jesus. Tell it all to him.

connecting all joy in whatever trial with prayer for God’s wisdom

Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything. If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. But when you ask, you must believe and not doubt, because the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That person should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. Such a person is double-minded and unstable in all they do.

James 1:2-8

When we’re in the pressure cooker, it’s easy to revert to something less than helpful. We need something better than fight or flight. And James gives us something much better here.

We’re to count it all joy when any given trial hits us, because through that God can do a deeper work in us. We need to persevere through it, so that we can grow in whatever way God has for us.

I think we can connect that with the directive to ask God for needed wisdom. Maybe it can stand alone as well, since James is more like Proverbs than any other book in the New Testament. Either way, it only makes sense to ask God for wisdom in trials. God will give it to us as we go on imperfectly as it will be, with a heart set on living in his will. In and through Jesus.

my thought (gathered from others and life) about the current distress

These times are days on edge for many. Yes, none of us want to get the coronavirus. And no one wants the economy to collapse. Untold suffering for many if the latter happens, surely with some deaths due to lack of medical attention or for other reasons. And likely more deaths if we don’t follow measures to contain the virus. There are no easy answers. And nothing easy about what needs to be done. And the division in the United States is surely deeper than ever in my lifetime.

Sometimes our reactions can be either worse than the problem, or no help at all, just making the situation worse, adding to the problem. I am thinking of the political divide. There’s no way to avoid being included in that even when we’re innocent and wanting to avoid it altogether. Or we may advocate for a position that happens to be more in line with one side or the other, not wanting to get involved in any war of words. I used to want to try to persuade others, but have come to see such an endeavor as naive. It likely does little if any good. There’s more at work than just words and rationality, and we can feel it in our own hearts in our reactions to postings online that we disagree with.

For us Christians, we need to applaud when we find any honest efforts to arrive at truth, or do good. And we need to ask questions when there seems to be a lack in either.

Above all, we need to be people of prayer. Present with others, whether we agree or not, whatever we might think. Trusting that God is somehow at work as we pray that truth, justice and mercy may prevail, with the full realization that this won’t entirely be the case before Christ returns. Until then we hold on to the word of life: the gospel, with the faith, hope and love that brings. In and through Jesus.

 

The Lord is risen! (Easter prayer and Scripture)

O God, who for our redemption gave your only-begotten Son to the death of the cross, and by his glorious resurrection delivered us from the power of our enemy: Grant us so to die daily to sin, that we may evermore live with him in the joy of his resurrection; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Book of Common Prayer

Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark, Mary Magdalene went to the tomb and saw that the stone had been removed from the entrance. So she came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one Jesus loved, and said, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we don’t know where they have put him!”

So Peter and the other disciple started for the tomb. Both were running, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. He bent over and looked in at the strips of linen lying there but did not go in. Then Simon Peter came along behind him and went straight into the tomb. He saw the strips of linen lying there, as well as the cloth that had been wrapped around Jesus’ head. The cloth was still lying in its place, separate from the linen. Finally the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went inside. He saw and believed. (They still did not understand from Scripture that Jesus had to rise from the dead.) Then the disciples went back to where they were staying.

Now Mary stood outside the tomb crying. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb and saw two angels in white, seated where Jesus’ body had been, one at the head and the other at the foot.

They asked her, “Woman, why are you crying?”

“They have taken my Lord away,” she said, “and I don’t know where they have put him.” At this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing there, but she did not realize that it was Jesus.

He asked her, “Woman, why are you crying? Who is it you are looking for?”

Thinking he was the gardener, she said, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have put him, and I will get him.”

Jesus said to her, “Mary.”

She turned toward him and cried out in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means “Teacher”).

Jesus said, “Do not hold on to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father. Go instead to my brothers and tell them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’”

Mary Magdalene went to the disciples with the news: “I have seen the Lord!” And she told them that he had said these things to her.

John 20:1-18

Jesus teaches his disciples (and us, hopefully disciples, too) on prayer

One day Jesus was praying in a certain place. When he finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray, just as John taught his disciples.”

He said to them, “When you pray, say:

“‘Father,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come.
Give us each day our daily bread.
Forgive us our sins,
for we also forgive everyone who sins against us.
And lead us not into temptation.’”

Then Jesus said to them, “Suppose you have a friend, and you go to him at midnight and say, ‘Friend, lend me three loaves of bread; a friend of mine on a journey has come to me, and I have no food to offer him.’ And suppose the one inside answers, ‘Don’t bother me. The door is already locked, and my children and I are in bed. I can’t get up and give you anything.’ I tell you, even though he will not get up and give you the bread because of friendship, yet because of your shameless audacity he will surely get up and give you as much as you need.

“So I say to you: Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; the one who seeks finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.

“Which of you fathers, if your son asks for a fish, will give him a snake instead? Or if he asks for an egg, will give him a scorpion? If you then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!”

Luke 11:1-13

If you want Jesus’s teaching on prayer in a nutshell, you probably can’t find a better passage then here (see also the great passage in the Sermon on the Mount: Matthew 6:5-15).

Jesus tells us the general pattern we should use in praying. While we can see from Scripture, including Jesus’s own life, that all kinds of prayers are acceptable, we do well to evaluate our prayer life in comparison to the “Our Father” prayer Jesus taught us. And to even pray the words of that prayer together, as well as to God, ourselves. So much in that prayer that can become individual prayers. Like in confession of sin, letting God know our needs, etc., not to mention what is basic, God as our Father whose name is to revered, and whose kingdom we long for.

Then Jesus tells us that we’re to pray in expectation, knowing our Father will answer. We come as God’s children in Jesus, believing that God always has our best interest at heart. And committing our cares, our loves ones, ourselves, and the world to him. In and through Jesus.

 

the prayer that God always affirms

This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us. And if we know that he hears us—whatever we ask—we know that we have what we asked of him.

1 John 5:14-15

Very truly I tell you, whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father. And I will do whatever you ask in my name, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. You may ask me for anything in my name, and I will do it.

John 14:12-14

Very truly I tell you, my Father will give you whatever you ask in my name. Until now you have not asked for anything in my name. Ask and you will receive, and your joy will be complete.

John 16:23b-24

It’s amazing, the promise in God’s word that should encourage us in our prayer life in Jesus. The challenge is to seek to pray according to God’s will. We find that will in Scripture. Our expectations though have to take in the full scope of God’s revealed will to us found there, and none of us can completely understand that, even if we know Scripture well. But even if we don’t know much, we can start praying with the faith of a little child. As God’s children, God’s Spirit will help us. God’s answer will come, but in God’s own good time and way.

This is a great encouragement to me, and something I want to think of more as I pray, whatever I’m praying about. As we seek to be a blessing to others. In and through Jesus.

 

 

fret not

do not fret—it leads only to evil.

Psalm 37:8b

I know I’m pulling this out of context, but I think the point I’m going to make is not contradictory to the point the passage is making. It’s taking matters into our own hands due to excessive worry. And when we do that, I know by experience we can make matters worse.

The Bible has a radical answer for God’s people. Don’t worry; don’t fret. The clearest directive for us is something I’ve shared times before, and I’m sure I’ll share again, Lord willing.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

That is radical. We’re not to worry, not to be anxious about anything at all. Instead we’re to trust God. Bringing our concern thankfully to God. And we have the promise that God’s peace which transcends our understanding will guard both our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus. That reminds me of another passage.

Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding;
in all your ways submit to him,
and he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 3:5-6

It’s a matter of trust: “trust and obey.” We find out what we can, but above all, we put the matter into God’s hands. He’ll take care of it. God can change anything. Or God will work for good in any and everything, even that which in and of itself is not good.

We just need to quit fretting, and instead pray. Develop that new habit and pattern until it becomes a part of who we are when we’re faced with fear. In and through Jesus.

 

just pray

Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.

Colossians 4:2

The older I get, and so much life gone over the dam, the more I realize that what I need to do is pray, pray some more, and keep on praying. It’s not only a matter of younger people thinking that what the older generation thinks is irrelevant. It’s more like I’ve come to see how it’s not a matter of what I do, but what God does that counts, and makes the needed difference. Only through God’s working will change come for any of us.

I sometimes think God withholds good from us when we don’t pray and look to him. God wants us to believe and trust, as well as be obedient. For me at this time, I do what I have to do, but largely lay low, stay out of the way, hopefully not getting in God’s way. And pray. Looking to God for what only God can do. In and through Jesus.

entering a new year: pray

We do not know what to do, but our eyes are on you.

2 Chronicles 20:12b

The story of the invasion of a huge military force is instructive to us, today. Good King Jehoshaphat looked to God for help. We too might feel overwhelmed heading into a new year with what we face, and with unknowns on a number of fronts. When we’re a bit lost, and maybe befuddled over some things, we can consider that God’s call for us to pray.

In this case God answered through a prophecy, King Jehoshaphat encouraged the people to trust in God, and then was moved to direct praise and worship God. God answered, so that Israel did not have to lift a finger themselves, not the way God always answers. Sometimes we have to get our hands dirty and get into the battle. The main point here is that we need to pray.

There are a lot of things we can do, as we read Scripture, and particularly the New Testament. And one of the main things again and again is simply to pray. From prayer God answers and acts. Prayer puts us in the position to hear and receive God’s answer. Prayer from the heart, real prayer, but also prayer in all our weakness. Just honest prayer is the point.

Again, God will answer, we can be assured of that. And part of that answer will be to help us focus on him all the more. As we receive by and by whatever answer he gives. That others too might see and fear, as in the story. That all might come to know him in and through Jesus.

 

for those who often don’t feel all that well

ד Daleth

I am laid low in the dust;
preserve my life according to your word.
I gave an account of my ways and you answered me;
teach me your decrees.
Cause me to understand the way of your precepts,
that I may meditate on your wonderful deeds.
My soul is weary with sorrow;
strengthen me according to your word.
Keep me from deceitful ways;
be gracious to me and teach me your law.
I have chosen the way of faithfulness;
I have set my heart on your laws.
I hold fast to your statutes, LORD;
do not let me be put to shame.
I run in the path of your commands,
for you have broadened my understanding.

Psalm 119:25-32

There’s not much room in Christian evangelical circles for people like me. A person who often feels “laid low in the dust.” And when people ask me how I am, it’s usually “pretty good.” Some people would call that down in the mouth, not rejoicing and living in the joy of the Lord as I should. That somehow my mind and faith isn’t right.

We come to God just as we are, and we don’t try to hide. We confess our sins, and pray God will keep us from deceitful ways, like justifying what we ought not to. We don’t let our inward struggle dictate what we do, of course only through God’s help.

I’m glad there are the psalms for people like me, which express the way I feel. “My soul is weary with sorrow…” But also with God’s help in the strength and provision given to us in answer to prayer, the prayer to live in God’s will with God’s answer forthcoming. For people like me, for everyone. In and through Jesus.