what world do you live in?

Now that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem. They were talking with each other about everything that had happened. As they talked and discussed these things with each other, Jesus himself came up and walked along with them; but they were kept from recognizing him.

He asked them, “What are you discussing together as you walk along?”

They stood still, their faces downcast. One of them, named Cleopas, asked him, “Are you the only one visiting Jerusalem who does not know the things that have happened there in these days?”

“What things?” he asked.

“About Jesus of Nazareth,” they replied. “He was a prophet, powerful in word and deed before God and all the people. The chief priests and our rulers handed him over to be sentenced to death, and they crucified him; but we had hoped that he was the one who was going to redeem Israel. And what is more, it is the third day since all this took place. In addition, some of our women amazed us. They went to the tomb early this morning but didn’t find his body. They came and told us that they had seen a vision of angels, who said he was alive. Then some of our companions went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said, but they did not see Jesus.”

He said to them, “How foolish you are, and how slow to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Did not the Messiah have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself.

Luke 24:13-27

“What world do you live in?” is kind of a rhetorical question, thus not requiring a definitive answer, but causing us more to reflect on just what we perceive reality to be. And certainly includes myself. I struggle with this myself, I would say, of course.

We are creatures of experience as well as what we have observed to be true. It’s hard to get hold of just why we see life as we do. Certainly experiences from the past, especially in formative childhood times contribute significantly to that.

For me, it’s easy to get down over so many things. But that’s when more than ever, but really as a habit of life, I need to get in and remain in scripture. Scripture takes us through all kinds of worlds in the sense of experience, but lands us where we need to be, and helps us find what is lacking. Scripture as God’s word impacts us in ways we can’t actually completely comprehend. But the difference is unmistakable. It was so after Jesus talked to these two followers.

As they approached the village to which they were going, Jesus continued on as if he were going farther. But they urged him strongly, “Stay with us, for it is nearly evening; the day is almost over.” So he went in to stay with them.

When he was at the table with them, he took bread, gave thanks, broke it and began to give it to them. Then their eyes were opened and they recognized him, and he disappeared from their sight. They asked each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked with us on the road and opened the Scriptures to us?”

They got up and returned at once to Jerusalem. There they found the Eleven and those with them, assembled together and saying, “It is true! The Lord has risen and has appeared to Simon.” Then the two told what had happened on the way, and how Jesus was recognized by them when he broke the bread.

Luke 24:28-35

The face change here had to become a change of heart and a transformation of life. The world we believers and followers of Jesus inhabit is one marked by God’s word to us in Jesus, and whatever follows that.

We have to learn by faith to more and more live in the world in which Jesus is at the center. And into which God is always speaking. Regardless of what else is going on. The real world in and through Jesus.

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the fresh breath/air of the Protestant Reformation

Sing to the Lord a new song;
sing to the Lord, all the earth.
Sing to the Lord, praise his name;
proclaim his salvation day after day.
Declare his glory among the nations,
his marvelous deeds among all peoples.

Psalm 96:1-3

I really don’t care to identify as Protestant, evangelical, Catholic, or whatever, but rather, as Christian. I know that even Christian carries with it some historical baggage which is not helpful, and actually distracts, not to mention, contradicts its true meaning.

But on Spotify today, while trying to scroll down to see the albums playing my favorite music artist, Johann Sebastian Bach, and being blocked from doing so by an add, I either purposefully or inadvertently hit an album which has beautiful singing (likely in German), but I lit on Bach’s chorale music, so beautiful, this album. Bach himself was a Lutheran, in a pietist Lutheran setting, one that had as an emphasis a personal relationship with Christ, or knowing Christ. I was reminded of the beautiful early Lutheran music at the time of that great Reformer and Church Father, Martin Luther.

What I identify with is the emphasis on scripture being the authority to which we appeal, while taking tradition seriously, yet subjecting everything to the test of scripture. For me that’s a breath of a fresh air. And not only lifts one’s spirits, but brings new life, so that a song of praise and thanksgiving to God is indeed appropriate. It is God’s word, scripture, the essence of which is the gospel, God’s good news in Christ, which indeed is transformative. For us and for the world, someday to fill the new earth after the final judgment and salvation, in and through Jesus.

meditation day and night

Blessed is the one
who does not walk in step with the wicked
or stand in the way that sinners take
or sit in the company of mockers,
but whose delight is in the law of the Lord,
and who meditates on his law day and night.
That person is like a tree planted by streams of water,
which yields its fruit in season
and whose leaf does not wither—
whatever they do prospers.

Not so the wicked!
They are like chaff
that the wind blows away.
Therefore the wicked will not stand in the judgment,
nor sinners in the assembly of the righteous.

For the Lord watches over the way of the righteous,
but the way of the wicked leads to destruction.

Psalm 1

While the point of the Bible is the gospel, we still need every detail written in it, to best understand the whole, including the gospel. And for the interactive relationship with God we need.

Scripture is challenging, but also encouraging, and everything else we need. While helping us look heavenward, it is down to earth where we live.

We have to be in the word day and night, taking it to heart, and letting it change us through and through from the inside out. And we view all of life in this world through its pages.

God meets us as we do so, with all that we need: the promises, blessings, warnings, etc. In and through Jesus.

 

not neglecting God’s word

ב Beth

How can a young person stay on the path of purity?
By living according to your word.
I seek you with all my heart;
do not let me stray from your commands.
I have hidden your word in my heart
that I might not sin against you.
Praise be to you, Lord;
teach me your decrees.
With my lips I recount
all the laws that come from your mouth.
I rejoice in following your statutes
as one rejoices in great riches.
I meditate on your precepts
and consider your ways.
I delight in your decrees;
I will not neglect your word.

Psalm 119:9-16

If there’s one thing that has stood out to me over the decades of being a Christian, it is the importance of scripture: God’s written word. Of course I’m referring to the “Bible.” If one reads the Bible and takes it to heart, they’ll come to realize that the Bible alone is not enough, because it points us to what else God provides for us in Christ, not least of which is the church. But we can say that scripture is foundational for life, for understanding God’s will, as well as God’s grace and salvation.

And scripture is important in helping us have an interactive relationship with God. Scripture is the primary means through which God speaks to us, at least being, again, foundational in that. We take our cues from scripture, God speaking to us both directly and indirectly through it.

It is easy to neglect God’s word, which is in part why I suppose the psalmist states that they will not neglect it. It takes commitment and effort on our part. And a willingness to simplify our lives around what is informative, formative, and vital for our Christian life. And we learn from those who are gifted and who study scripture to teach it week after week, as well as those who do the same in writing books.

We need to take this to heart and to life and keep doing so, in and through Jesus.

the Bible: real people, the real world

I heard or read that a Christian leader of the past wanted his biography to include warts and all. I appreciate that. And that’s exactly what the Bible does. Read the list of names in Hebrews 11 for example. David is a prime example of what I’m talking about. Real people who made mistakes, some glaring ones, old fashioned sin, yet repented, and found their way in God.

And the Bible refers to a real world, not some make believe existence which really is not present, except on TV or something make believe. But also the Bible awakens us to the world as God conceived and created it to be, the beginning of which is found in Christ in the new creation. The church is the integral part of that, through faith in the good news in Jesus, in scripture, and baptism. It is already a God-centered world, not man-centered. And someday that will all be not only evident to all, but really the “air” everyone breathes, when heaven and earth become one in Jesus.

I like that, because I’m a real person who struggles just like everyone else, and has not done as well as I should have at certain parts of my life. But has also repented, and continues to repent, as needed. What we need is truth, and all of it. Truth exposes us, but it also leads us to what we were made for in the first place. We have to be open to it, to other possibilities other than the myths we’ve grown up with. The true myth, since myth itself does not necessarily mean what isn’t true. It is a representation of what actually is real in a world that embraces what’s really not. Truth is found in the one who claimed that he himself is the way and the truth and the life (John 14:6).

Again, that’s why I much prefer the Bible. It tells the truth about ourselves, but it also shows us what God wants. Beginning in this life, and fulfilled completely in the next, in and through Jesus.

plodding on with scripture

I notice sometimes that people are trying to help others by coming up with something novel, maybe even new. That reminds me of how ancient philosophers used to gather regularly around Mars Hill in Athens, doing nothing more than listening to the latest new idea, or thoughts. Maybe it was in part a search for truth, which actually in itself is good. But it seems that all too often it’s more of a search for notoriety, to become famous, well known, respected. Not to say that saying the old things in a new way isn’t valuable. Or that God might even give some new insight to his church through his word, at least for the times that are faced.

I believe, while it’s perfectly all right, in fact good to read widely to some extent, that we Christians need to major on scripture, and plod along in that. We need the whole of it, along with every part.

It has been well noted by someone that scripture is an education in and of itself. A big one. But it won’t make people on different spectrums prevalent today altogether happy. Unfortunately we read into it our own thoughts, and force it into our grids. Instead, insofar as possible, we need to work at letting it speak, and God speak through it to us. We do need the church, and what the Spirit is and has been saying to the church at large through God’s word. And we need to remain in scripture in the midst of all of that. We need to let God’s word critique us, our lives, and our world. And through that, find God’s good will, and salvation, in and through Jesus.

what is needed: an enlarged heart and mind

I can enjoy all kinds of music. I suppose classical music reminds me the most of scripture as a whole. There is much variation and beauty in it. But you have to be willing to go through the entire piece, not just favorite parts of it.

And you’ll find all kinds of in and outs, and whatever musicians might call them in a given piece. The same is certainly true for scripture. A certain theme is likely in play, but how it is woven and emerges is missed when it is not appreciated in its entirety. That includes the parts either not understood, or seemingly unnecessary, maybe even offensive at least on the surface. We need to listen to all of it to learn to see and appreciate the whole.

One wouldn’t have to be stuck with classical music as the one analogy to compare with the need to be thoroughly acquainted with, and more than that, in interplay with all of scripture, to understand the whole, indeed God’s story given to us, and made complete in Jesus. Other comparisons would do, perhaps good books or films. I think classical music might be especially apt since it seems that genre has fallen on hard times, at least in the United States. It has its devoted, loyal following, but only a small percentage (I read 3%) listen to it in the US. And the Bible itself seems to have fallen on the same hard times. While a lot of people have some sort of respect and maybe even reverence for the Bible, few have read it from cover to cover themselves, or read it at all in the course of a week. Nowadays you can listen to it easily enough, as well as read it.

What is needed is a Biblical mindset, and heart that is expanded accordingly. That certainly has challenges all their own. But what will be found is a remarkable, beautiful, even if mysterious world. Where all the parts have their place within the whole.

So if you try classical music, use only most popular or listened to works maybe as just an introduction. Play through an entire musical piece from start to finish, even when parts of it are not understood or even liked. Just play it through. And the same goes for scripture. One way or another, get in all of it. Whole books, and in the end, the entire Book. Meant to shape us individually and together as God’s people, in and through Jesus.