a simple look at the translation of the Greek word transliterated hyperecho in Philippians 4:7

And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:7

In the great promise on avoiding or dealing with anxiety, I like the New International Version‘s translation of the Greek word transliterated hyperechotranscends. I used to not care much for it. Surpasses, though is not a word we use that often. And in this context, to me it is confusing. The peace of God surpasses our understanding. What does that mean. In our thinking it might mean it simply bypasses it. What it really means, if we think about it more, is that it is greater than our understanding. And we could say, above and beyond it. Even the idea from the New Living Translation that God’s peace exceeds anything we can understand, while helpful, still is not quite satisfying to me, when trying to make sense of this.

So the NIV‘s “transcends” I end up finding helpful, after all. It has the idea to me of above and beyond. So that we’re to live in that peace when our understanding fails, believing that God is in it, and that we can trust him. Which is at the heart of what the promise in Philippians 4:6-7 is all about. In and through Jesus.

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learning to live in weakness

I must go on boasting. Although there is nothing to be gained, I will go on to visions and revelations from the Lord. I know a man in Christ who fourteen years ago was caught up to the third heaven. Whether it was in the body or out of the body I do not know—God knows. And I know that this man—whether in the body or apart from the body I do not know, but God knows— was caught up to paradise and heard inexpressible things, things that no one is permitted to tell. I will boast about a man like that, but I will not boast about myself, except about my weaknesses. Even if I should choose to boast, I would not be a fool, because I would be speaking the truth. But I refrain, so no one will think more of me than is warranted by what I do or say, or because of these surpassingly great revelations. Therefore, in order to keep me from becoming conceited, I was given a thorn in my flesh, a messenger of Satan, to torment me. Three times I pleaded with the Lord to take it away from me. But he said to me, “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness.” Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Christ’s power may rest on me. That is why, for Christ’s sake, I delight in weaknesses, in insults, in hardships, in persecutions, in difficulties. For when I am weak, then I am strong.

2 Corinthians 12:1-10

Just an opening thought on my blogging: it might be and to some extent surely is a telling critique to suggest that blogging everyday does not allow the blogger or whatever reader audience may be present to really process and digest what is written. I have been blogging for more than ten years now and it was suggested in the early days when blogging was hot that to have the most effective blog, one should blog daily. So I soon adopted that, which has long been a habit. I enjoy writing, so that’s part of it. But if you look at my blog, you’ll notice that some of the same themes come up again and again. And more than less, nearly every posting is a continuation of the thought, or likely more like a variation of it, which has been hashed through a number of posts previously. That could be in part because I tend to always process thoughts over time.

Weakness is one of the major themes I keep coming to time and time again. That’s probably because I’m a slow learner on it, but it’s also because it’s not an easy lesson to learn, at least not for me. Who wants to live in weakness?

I’m not referring to a weakness in giving into sin, but weakness in the midst of resisting sin. Not to say we can be sinless, either. But I am referring to the kind of overcoming by faith which lives in the midst of weakness.

For me, one aspect of this is my struggle against anxiety, which can be a sin in not trusting God. And what I’m coming to find is that my quest for certainty often leads to a gnawing and then choking anxiety, which by the time I get to that, I can easily see the enemy at work, so that I can give the lie to that thought, and accept only God’s work and the peace which accompanies that.

Of course there’s no real certainty in this world (except, as they say, of death and taxes). Nothing seems totally foolproof here, or as if there’s an arrival to some kind of eureka in which all is well, try and try again, as we all do, and as certain projects have. We do well to accept that, and even embrace it. At the same time doing the best we can, but recognizing that at times, that too will not be enough. And in a certain sense never is since God’s hand must accompany or hold, and most accurately even be what is behind the work in the first place.

I think I might be coming to a new place in learning to live with weakness, which has been incremental with seeming breakthroughs along the way, only to be tested time and time again. I hope by God’s grace to continue to grow in this. Along with others. In and through Jesus.

faith

If there’s one most basic thing the Lord calls us to, it probably is faith. Faith in God, in God’s word, in the gospel, the good news in Jesus.

Faith at its bare essential is receiving from God, so we do well to be in that posture. At its onset it comes from hearing the message about Christ (Romans 10).  Faith ushers us into a new relationship and reality. We know God and are a part of God’s family. And that involves a number of basic things for sure. All expressed in love, and with hope; faith, hope and love being joined together.

But even though I’ve been on this faith journey for decades, in some ways I’m afraid I never matured, at least not much. Anxiety has been my number one “besetting” sin. God has been working on that, and teaching me to let go and live in his peace more, but still I find myself in need of doing the same thing over again, and again and again. I wish I could settle more into a disposition of rest and peace in God’s grace.

There are Christian traditions which seem to make much of the faith, the gospel, and there are other Christian traditions which seem to make much of faith, the response to the gospel. Of course we need both. Faith comes from the faith, and is dependent on that. But the faith gives faith and instills that in us.

And so as I face a new day, I want to do so with a renewed commitment to faith in God, come what may. Believing in God, receiving his word, trusting in him so that I can do the works that come from a faith characterized by love and sustained by hope. In and through Jesus.

 

“more joy/less anxiety”

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God,which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:4-9

I thought I pretty much had the beast of anxiety under control, not that I had arrived on that score. That has been the sin of default to which I can always fall into at any time, but which I think I am handling better even when it comes and takes over. But better yet is to somehow not let it get into the doorway or entry point of one’s heart and life in the first place. But that thought has seemed to me more fantasy and fiction than anything else. It just doesn’t seem to work in the real world. And yet I know better, both in terms of scripture, and even with reference to science in how the brain works, specifically neuroscience. But especially because I believe there is a God who has quite specific promises in this direction, the most direct on this issue in the passage quoted above.

Back to the first point: So I had worked three 13 hour days and was naturally tired, more drowsy than I imagined, and of course I wasn’t all that concerned about a message on anxiety, though I was definitely interested. Naturally according to script, I dozed off, and in this case probably missed almost half the message, more or less. So as I do if I doze off at all, I’ll watch the message later.

Yesterday while doing some work around the house, a thought hit me over a matter I thought was resolved, and I couldn’t shake it and anxiety was taking over. I knew that later when I would have the time to watch it, I would be completely all ears when listening to this message on anxiety. And I’m thankful that there will be a series on anxiety after Thanksgiving. It came across to me as the best message I’ve heard on the subject. I would highly recommend this message from Pastor Jeff Manion of Ada Bible Church, the one in the series on Philippians: Choosing Joy Under Pressure, week 9: more joy/less anxiety.

The message in a nutshell: see the text above, and consider your view of God and your focus on God’s generosity (or failure to see well, and do this), how that affects your demeanor and conduct, how we’re to simply pray so that we’ll receive God’s peace, what our thought life is to be like with reference to what we take in during the course of a day. And how we’re to follow Paul’s example in all of this, Paul who was incarcerated at the time, awaiting trial before an unpredictable emperor, Nero, so that depending on how the emperor was doing he might be released or executed. And yet knew joy, as this letter makes clear, helping a struggling church. That summarizes the message, but misses so much.

So this is something I will continue to work on. I’m in process, but looking forward to a growth which takes on more and more joy, and less and less anxiety in and through Jesus.

the Father says don’t be anxious, period, but instead…

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

Sometimes I wonder if the absolutes are really absolute. I prefer to see a lot of the commands as loving directives by a Father, and in a sense, I’m sure they are. Tone matters. But the words still come across as absolutes in the sense that we’re to brook no compromise whatsoever, but simply do what we’re told to do.

I also believe a loving Father sees our sincere attempts, as weak as they are, and in grace honors them. And then helps us. The help comes. It may not seem as immediate as we like, but then again, neither was our compliance to this directive immediate. Oddly enough the answer may have already come, but our brain and heart have to get acclimated to the new reality. Of course part of the answer will be to be transformed by the renewing of our minds (Romans 12:2), and that is a lifelong process, as well as renewing thoughts coming to us by the Spirit when need be.

Interestingly, we often turn to the above passage only after we have succumbed to anxiety and fear, and are perhaps steeped in worry. I would like to better apply this before the fall in that pit happens. To either try to lessen it, or avoid it altogether.

It is such a difference, either being in the light, or in the darkness. It is either a light or darkness which penetrates one’s very soul, their entire life. So that every act in the light is a delight, and in the dark is more like drudgery with difficulty. And at times, it seems I can be somewhere between.

Faith needs awakening, and so these times of being tempted, or even falling into the anxiety may serve that purpose. Nevertheless this passage, God’s word, tells us not to be anxious about anything. Pretty absolute from a loving Father. But instead in every situation to pray and ask God with thanksgiving with the promise that his peace will guard our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

I hope to be more alert and faithful in applying this, next time something comes to my mind that is troubling on that level for me. Part of my growth in grace, I take it, in and through Jesus.

holding on to what lasts

“See, I will create
    new heavens and a new earth.
The former things will not be remembered,
    nor will they come to mind.

Isaiah 65:17

Essentially what seems to be at the heart of this picture is the curse of Genesis 3 being removed in what is nothing less than a new creation. Maybe making the old new, or making something brand new that has similarities to the old. Different, either way.

So much that occupies our minds is destined to be forgotten forever. I know this application is not quite what the passage above is getting at, but it’s nevertheless apt from it, I think. What I’m thinking of is perhaps made more clear by our Lord’s words in the parable of the sower:

Still others, like seed sown among thorns, hear the word; but the worries of this life, the deceitfulness of wealth and the desires for other things come in and choke the word, making it unfruitful.

Mark 4:18-19

This reminds us of our Lord’s teaching in the Sermon on the Mount, telling us to store up for ourselves treasures in heaven, rather than treasures on earth, and not to worry about material provisions since we are in the Father’s care. But instead, to seek first God’s kingdom and righteousness, knowing all of our needs will be met (Matthew 6:19-34).

There is no question that we have responsibilities on earth that we would just as soon forget even now. But insofar as they are connected to that which lasts, we need to do as well as we can in fulfilling such.

What lasts is the love of God that is in Jesus and present to us by the Spirit. We want to live in that love, and share that love with everyone, particularly our families, where often the rubber meets the road as to just what kind of people we really are, and more importantly, are becoming. And we have special responsibility to them. I think of Paul’s words:

Anyone who does not provide for their relatives, and especially for their own household, has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.

1 Timothy 5:8

So we can’t shirk our duties in the name of devotion to God, and think we are devoted to God. But in the midst of that, we must put first things first. Doing the best we can, realizing that in this life, much of it will be a crap shoot, meaning neither fool proof nor assured. But in all of that seeking to hold on to that which will last. A prayer in the Book of Common Prayer is helpful here:

Grant us, Lord, not to be anxious about earthly things, but to love things heavenly; and even now, while we are placed among things that are passing away, to hold fast to those that shall endure; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

not letting the pressing duties of life get to us

 Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid.

John 14

Life is pressure, period. Work is never entirely predictable, and even when it is, that predictability might have us living on the edge at times. And if you “own” a home, in some ways the home owns you as well, because if there isn’t one thing, there’s another to look after to maintain it. On top of this, there are always possible things to worry about on the side. Like is one’s car safe enough? Or where is the money (and/or time) going to come from for the next need. For those who have plenty of money in store, there are always potential problems, as well. In this world, there’s no short supply of that.

First of all we might say, yes, we need to do the best we can to do what we can, and certainly take care of what absolutely has to get done (like a house roof, which for me of course, means hiring a company to do it). But we as Christians do all of this as those on mission in Jesus for the gospel. That is our chief concern, indeed the passion that drives us, the very life we have in Jesus, which we would like in love to share with others.

Jesus imparted words of strength and comfort to his disciples on the eve of his crucifixion (see John 13-17 for that entire time in John’s gospel account). And even though they were Jesus’s appointed messengers and representatives of the gospel, we as Jesus’s followers can receive those same words for ourselves, since we too, even though not set apart in the same way, still are present as receivers and sharers of the gospel.

Jesus gives us his peace, and at the same time tells us not to let our hearts be troubled nor afraid. Even if we’re caught up in fear, we can let go of it by the Lord’s strength in the peace which he gives, and live in that peace once more, trusting in him to help us through whatever situation we might be in, as well as life in general. Including trusting even when things don’t go well.

Something I am learning, and want to hold on to in and through Jesus.