don’t despise what’s simple (the example here for the anxious, like me)

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:4-9

We can often look at the simple as simplistic. And maybe somehow beneath us? That may or may not be what we need to humble us. But whatever may be the case, we dare not discount and put aside what might seem too obvious, for something more sophisticated and complex, even if we think that our problem is complex. It surely is, but we need to remember too that what is simple is often quite profound.

And this is no less the case in the above Scripture passage. What if we like myself, who are so prone to anxiety would start to put this passage into practice? I know there might be some who would roll their eyes thinking that this is like using a precious promise book, strewn with maybe a hundred verses we’re supposed to claim. It would be good to read the entire book of Philippians, for sure, and meditate on it all, and we need to do that, too.

Remember, the exercise itself will be beneficial, even if one is still lost in anxiety. What is true about those who suffer anxiety as I have over the years, is that the real problem is not the problem itself, but the anxiety. If one is not anxious about one thing, they’ll be anxious about something else. When one anxiety is lifted, there will be another anxiety to take its place. And what one finds out is that basically the approach to life is to be anxious, more or less filled with anxiety.

Instead we need to take this simple yet not simplistic approach of mouthing the above Scripture passage, for example, maybe after we’ve memorized it. And seeking to put it into practice in the midst of our day. If we stay at it, we’ll find eventually that the cloud will lift, that God will honor that. Always in the context of a life in which we are committed to following the Lord. Yes, in view of the full letter of Philippians, and all the rest God has given and will give us. In and through Jesus.

learning to trust God/the Father in everything

Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding;
in all your ways submit to him,
and he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 3:5-6

Trust God from the bottom of your heart;
don’t try to figure out everything on your own.
Listen for God’s voice in everything you do, everywhere you go;
he’s the one who will keep you on track.

Proverbs 3:5-6; MSG

None of us are going to be perfect in this life. We’ll lapse into this or that which is wrong. Though we really should be making progress. And hopefully leave the most hurtful, damaging sins behind, and get help with whatever addictions we have. There indeed ought to be substantial progress in our lives toward Christ-likeness together with others in Christ.

In my own life, though I’ve had other issues, probably far and away the one that has plagued me the longest, and been most endemic in my life is the anxiety issue, which a few times has bordered on panic. A feeling of depression might come in second, though I think for me, anxiety and nagging worry is the clear enough winner. I was glad for those times when it seemed either dissipated or absent, but more often than not, it was present in one form or another. I am surprised in talking with others just how common this is.

It seems to me that God might be trying to teach me a new radical trust. I’m not talking about sinless perfection, since there is none of that in this life. Instead what I’m referring to is a new habit of life, learned over time. The Scripture quoted above from Proverbs might seem idealistic and really beyond our reach in this life. But really? Didn’t Jesus both exemplify and teach us to trust the Father without reservation (Matthew 6:25-34)? Again, we won’t do that perfectly in this life, and even when we have our times of doing it better, we’ll certainly flub up along the way.

I think what the Father wants us to get accustomed to and acclimated with is the idea that he’ll take care of us, he’ll take care of everything. That we need to and indeed can settle into that reality, and develop a new disposition corresponding to that. And that if we don’t trust the Father in one particular matter, then we’re failing to trust him. This isn’t at all like an Authoritarian ready to beat us with a club if we don’t trust them. But a most loving, caring Father.

This hit home to me, because there are a number of matters about our house which have given me grave, likely a bit of undue or overblown concern, but real issues, nonetheless. It probably doesn’t help for me to downplay them, because then trust in God really isn’t going to matter that much. It’s not like I should be negligent in what I know I need to do, or have to do. And I’m not. But does involve weighing everything, and trusting God with the resources God gives us to make good decisions. And above all, for the likes of me, to simply trust God. A simple trust. That God will work things out, that I not only need not worry and fret. But that indeed, I should not. That God will take care of it, whatever that ends up involving on my part. All of this as with everything else in and through Jesus.

the very hairs of our head are numbered

Do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather, be afraid of the One who can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care. And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.

Matthew 10:28-31

We in Jesus need to live as if the words of Jesus are true. Here within the context of potentially dangerous mission, we’re told not to be afraid. That the Father’s care for his children is down to the last detail, even the number of hairs on our head. We need to let that sink in when we’re worrying about this or that. Granted, that thought might be taken out of context, but since we’re God’s children, in whatever circumstance we’re in, it applies.

Does the Father love us or not? And just what does that mean? Can we rest assured in him regardless of what’s we’re facing? I think sometimes we just have to take a deep breath and say to ourselves that no matter how we feel, or what we’re thinking, we are committed to the truth that is in Jesus. And part of the heart of that truth is God’s immense, immeasurable love for his children. I want to add too that God loves the world with all of God’s heart, which is seen in the cross. But to enter into that love out of the destruction and curse of our own ways, we must commit ourselves to faith in Christ, simply trusting in him, and God’s gift of salvation in him.

But back to the main point: God- the Father in Christ with the Spirit- loves, and has a special family love for those who have been born from above, and adopted into God’s family. So no matter what, we must commit ourselves to that. The sense that comes with that will come to us, as we hold on by faith. But we also need to remember that within this is a world of grace, God’s grace meaning gift and favor, which is greater than any “true” thought or fear we might have. Instead of this having reasons because of us, though I do believe God loves all he has created, it is also like “Just because.” I love Ted, or put your name in the blank, just because, and with all my heart.” But that also includes the wonder in God’s creation of all of us and his personal delight in design of and for us to more than fit into his family. We need to learn to go with that, out of our fear into God’s immense and personal love for each and everyone of us. In and through Jesus.

not above worry

Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.

1 Peter 5:7

Live carefree before God; he is most careful with you.

1 Peter 5:7; MSG

Not long ago I wrote a post which has helped me up to this time to refuse worry, holding it at bay while I try to see the bigger picture. The emphasis in the post was that through God’s grace and provision to us, we’re to make the effort needed to grow, and as that letter says in the end, to grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ (2 Peter).

I love the thought from Eugene Peterson’s rendering of this passage, the idea of living carefree before God. God is careful, or full of care in the right way over us, and will take care of whatever troubles us. It almost seems like this is something that we simply much choose to do.

I’ve noticed in my own life that when I get back in the worrying mode, I just go on from one gnawing concern to another. No sooner do I get out, or break free than another one is either on me, or just around the corner. I remember years ago that when I wasn’t worrying about something, I was kind of like worrying when the next worry would hit me.

Contrast that to simply choosing to live carefree before God. Or as the more literal translation says, to cast all our anxiety on God. So that it requires our effort, but is also something we simply live in. That’s when I’ve found that once again I can hold worries at bay. Refusing to receive them so that I simply live anxiety free.  That makes an amazing difference in being able to receive and appreciate God’s good gift and goodness to us in Jesus. Either I think I have to be uptight, or believe God will take care of whatever the concern is.

So it’s one or the other. We’ll live in anxiety and worry over one thing after the next. Or we’ll refuse to do that, instead casting our cares on God so that we can live carefree lives before him. I suppose for many, there’s something in between. I am beginning, I think to understand that it’s better to simply live in God’s peace no matter what happens, then to not live in that peace while supposedly avoiding trouble. Problems, trouble, even trials are unavoidable in this life.

I have managed my anxiety issues better in the past months. But with the recent post mentioned above had basically broken free from it altogether, little more than a week, ha. I want to go on now, trusting the Lord will be with me to help me deal responsibly with situations, hopefully with his wisdom and not my own understanding (Proverbs 3:5-6). Just to live within the normal tension of life, but more and more experiencing that peace of God that surpasses our understanding (Philippians 4:6-7). In and through Jesus.

getting needed strength

Why would you ever complain, O Jacob,
or, whine, Israel, saying,
God has lost track of me.
He doesn’t care what happens to me”?
Don’t you know anything? Haven’t you been listening?
God doesn’t come and go. God lasts.
He’s Creator of all you can see or imagine.
He doesn’t get tired out, doesn’t pause to catch his breath.
And he knows everything, inside and out.
He energizes those who get tired,
gives fresh strength to dropouts.
For even young people tire and drop out,
young folk in their prime stumble and fall.
But those who wait upon God get fresh strength.
They spread their wings and soar like eagles,
They run and don’t get tired,
they walk and don’t lag behind.

Isaiah 40:27-31; MSG

There are times, as they say, which try men’s souls. Well, we’re living in such times now in which there are really no clear answers to the problems society faces, the divisions sharper and stronger than ever in my lifetime. And then for many of us, we have an ongoing issue with anxieties of this life, some of the concerns unavoidable, part of living in a broken world.

Isaiah’s word was to a people, God’s people, who thought that their God had forgotten them. They faced problems, just like they always had (study Israel’s history beginning with Abraham), some of it because of their own failure to trust God, because of their own sin. God’s promise of strength here comes within the context of a people whose strength was gone probably because they were gripped with fear due to their circumstances, what they were up against, real or imagined. And strength was gone.

What are God’s people to do, caught in this fix? Simple: Wait on God. That carries with it the idea of hope and trust. We believe God has forgiven us in Christ as we look to Christ for our salvation. But not only that, we look to God in and through Christ for everything else we need, including peace of heart and mind given the understandable concerns we have.

Our call here is to wait. Not something we’re necessarily good at doing in this day and age when almost anything we want or need we can have in a day, unless we’re short on resources. But for all, for everyone in Christ, all we need to do is wait, wait on God. God can give us the intestinal fortitude we need so that no matter what concerns we have, what we face, we somehow will have fresh, needed strength to carry on in whatever way is needed. We can be assured of that. Waiting in prayer, looking to God, simply waiting. In and through Jesus.

letting God help us grow in the hard places

Consider it a sheer gift, friends, when tests and challenges come at you from all sides. You know that under pressure, your faith-life is forced into the open and shows its true colors. So don’t try to get out of anything prematurely. Let it do its work so you become mature and well-developed, not deficient in any way.

James 1:2-4; MSG

If you’ve read my posts now and then, you’ll sooner or later gather that I have almost what might seem to be an anxiety disorder. It’s something I’ve lived in for so long, that I’m not sure I’ve ever been without it. Of course there’s the normal anxiety we all face, to meet our responsibilities, do our jobs well, etc. But this goes beyond that. And you come to realize that while it might be helped with counseling and even at times, medication, that it seems to have a life all its own. I enjoy the times when it seems to be abated, nonexistent, and I either just enjoy those times, or try to take advantage of them by doing what I think might be useful beyond what I normally do.

But lo and behold, I find myself slammed again and again by such. But I have been much better in recent times and growing in seeking to manage such through faith, in prayer and Scripture. While facing another challenge yesterday, I turned to James in the Bible I’m reading through now, Eugene Peterson’s The Message. “So don’t try to get out of anything prematurely” stood out to me. When you’re in a trial, if there’s any way out, any escape route, it’s only natural for us to go for that, no questions asked. We want out, and we want out now.

But James tells us we need to hang in there, and let God see us through. Not only out of the trial itself, which is what I all too often have only cared about, but through the trial into more of the fully formed person God wants us to be in Christ. This is an important part of our calling now. Trials will come, but so will God’s help if we just trust God, praying and asking for wisdom through it all (click above link for that part). Along with the needed change in us. But only if we don’t try to get out it before God’s work is done. In and through Jesus.

getting over worry(?)

Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done. Then you will experience God’s peace, which exceeds anything we can understand. His peace will guard your hearts and minds as you live in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7; NLT

Years, even decades ago I called in to a radio program on a local Christian station to talk to a wise man, Herb Vander Lugt. I was frustrated over my lifelong problem of worry. I asked him something like what if I just made the commitment not to worry, period. Would that work? With whatever else I had in mind, maybe just a firm resolution that direction. As I recall he chuckled, and then gave his wise mature pastoral advice from Scripture. Not sure what my response was. Except that I really didn’t learn to apply Scripture well in the way he said. Sure, there were times when I applied the above passage and experienced God’s answer, probably a fairly good number of times. But too often, sadly more than not, I would get hung up really badly on some point, and when that was over it wouldn’t be long until my next anxiety bout hit. This didn’t really amount to panic attacks, nor anything I couldn’t live with. But it did put me under a cloud of gloom, or contributed to that, where I lived far too much of the time.

Fast forward to now. I think I manage my worry issue better than I used to, seeking to apply Scripture, and trusting, no matter what my experience. But lately it’s amped up again. And unfortunately having been conditioned so long in this, it’s like the bottom drops out so that almost as soon as the next worry hits, I can be sure to experience a huge down drag. 

Today I was working on some house project, and realizing that a nagging worry about this and that was taking hold. The thought came, yes, I basically worry about everything. What if instead I refused to worry about anything? Of course resolutions won’t help, that is if it’s just self-effort. But resolve is not altogether bad, certainly not wrong in itself. It is good to say no, I won’t worry about anything, but rather pray about everything because of what we’re told in the above Scripture.

We need to think of all of Scripture, and of life itself. Worry and anxiety are something of an act, but a condition as well. Some of us all too easily are anxious about this and that, often overcome by worry. Googling can help, but it can also hinder. The more you know, the more you wonder. And can remain uncertain about so many things.

It would help us if we would simply realize that bad things do happen in this world. And that even with our best efforts, we just don’t know it all. And this life is certain to be full of problems. But at the same time, remembering God and God’s promises, that God has it, God knows and is able, and we’re at best limited and dependent.

We ought to do the best we can especially in concern for others, as well as taking care of responsibilities. We should keep working at that, knowing it will never end. And that even our best efforts may not prevent what we want to avoid. 

I think it is important to practice what Paul tells us above. Then regardless of what happens, God’s peace will see us through, guarding our hearts and minds. Better than getting what we want, and in view of the reality that often won’t happen anyhow.

don’t worry. pray.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

“Don’t worry, be happy” was a saying going around from a song which has some truth to it, but superficiality as well. Not so what Paul tells us here. This is truth which speaks to where we live. But we have to apply it, put it into practice.

To do that, one ought to read the entire letter and let that soak in. And along with that, the rest of the New Testament, starting with the gospel accounts (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John). And the rest of Scripture. We need to see all of life within the big picture. God’s Story.

But we can start here. We’ll do this imperfectly for sure. We should just do it, refusing to be swallowed up with anxiety and worry. To be overcome with anxiety and possibly the panic that comes with that means we’re not trusting. We need to trust God no matter what. No matter what. And do what Paul tells us here. We’ll get the help we need. In and through Jesus.

*I want to add as a footnote to this post. Some may need counseling and medication. There is no shame in that, none whatsoever. That’s a part of being human. Before one goes that route, one should do what they can, hold their ground, and seek to trust. Sometimes there are both psychological and physiological factors that need to be taken seriously, which attended to, can help.

living in the moment

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Matthew 6:34

Søren Kierkegaard wrote about living fully in the moment, and how that faith is to be understood as far as how we live it out, in that context. I am just beginning to wade into Kirkegaard, so I can’t represent his thought well even on this. But I too believe that we find faith and God’s sufficiency in what we meet each day, the challenges as well as blessings.

That each moment can be full of God is a revelation in and of itself. Faith is not about wallowing in the past with its “what ifs” and regrets. Nor is it about dreading the future, or trying to figure out, even map out what’s ahead. Instead it’s living responsibly and fully in the present.

Jesus tells us that as we make following him and seeking God’s kingdom in him first, we don’t need to worry about anything else. We take one thing at a time, even from our list of many things, yes. I’ve found that I really can’t multi-task. I’m used to juggling, but really we can do only one thing well at a time. And it’s been said that to try to do more than one thing is actually debilitating to us.

There’s plenty on the plate in life. It really does behoove young disciples to try to carve out a lifestyle in which there are less concerns. If you accept what society and the world tells you that you need, your life will be full of many cares, inescapable problems. God meets us where we’re at, so it’s not like we’re abandoned in the midst of all of that. God will help us through as we trust in him moment by moment. Just good if much of that could be avoided so we could concentrate more fully on following Christ.

So that’s what I hope for as I begin a new week. To live more fully, yes fully in each moment. Before God, for God, and yes, even in the many dead spots. To take just one thing at a time. To not worry about the rest. As I hopefully learn more and more about what following Jesus in this life, and in my life means. In and through him.

effort needed to overcome anxiety

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.

1 Peter 5:7

God is the one who relieves us of our anxiety and worry through Christ. Only God can do that. But it does require our effort. That is clear in the above passages. We have to pray instead of worry. But when worry overcomes us, we cast that on God. That requires our effort.

Anxiety and worry is not God’s will for us. We sometimes hold on to it as if it’s our duty, or like it’s God’s will for us. We somehow think we’re to take care of the underlying issue, solve the problem causing the worry. When all God wants us to do is pray, telling him the problem, giving him thanks, with the promise that the peace of God beyond our understanding will guard our hearts and minds in Christ Jesus. In other words, God will keep us from anxiety and worry, or take it away from us. We’re also told to cast all our anxiety on God, because God cares for us.

That requires effort on our part. We can’t just wish God would do something about our anxiety, and we certainly shouldn’t hold on to it as if it’s our duty and responsibility. Instead we’re to relinquish the problem entirely to God in thankful prayer. To cast what anxiety we have on God. God wants us not to be overcome with anxiety, but sometimes we will, too often for some of us. God doesn’t say we’re on our own when that happens, but tells us to cast all of it on him. Because he cares for us.

Something I’m working on, and have to do off and on. In and through Jesus.