pray for yourself

Lord, do not rebuke me in your anger
or discipline me in your wrath.
Have mercy on me, Lord, for I am faint;
heal me, Lord, for my bones are in agony.
My soul is in deep anguish.
How long, Lord, how long?

Turn, Lord, and deliver me;
save me because of your unfailing love.

Psalm 6:1-4

In the morning and evening offices in our new hymnal, Voices Together (985, 987), there is the part toward the end when we’re offering prayers.

We pray for ourselves and those dear to us…

At first, when I was beginning to do this every morning and night, I gently resisted the idea of praying for myself, especially first. But I dutifully did it, knowing that I’m not as wise as the collective wisdom of others. And I began to more and more see the wisdom of doing so. If God doesn’t help me or I receive little of that, I certainly can be of little or no help to others. James tells us that we don’t have because we don’t ask God. And I’m reminded of the African-American spiritual,

It’s me, it’s me, O Lord, standing in the need of prayer. It’s me, it’s me, O Lord, standing in the need of prayer. Not my brother, not my sister, but it’s me, O Lord, standing in the need of prayer. Not my brother, not my sister, but it’s me, O Lord, standing in the need of prayer.

This really has been a tremendous help to me. We pray for “those dear to us,” “our community and…our neighbors,” “for the church,” “for the world,” “for other concerns we carry in our hearts.” But it begins with us. We can see that in Jesus’s high priestly prayer on the eve of his crucifixion. He first prayed that the Father would glorify him so that he could glorify the Father (John 17). I can’t help but think that when Jesus used to break away early mornings to pray to the Father that he lifted himself up for the help he needed, as well as praying for his disciples and others, whatever else he might have prayed. Certainly enjoying his fellowship as God. Yes, he is God, but fully human, too. And in this life in which he lived, he did so in full dependence on the Father.

But again, this practice is helping me immensely. I have not done this on a regular basis, as far as I know, ever. Just here and there, when I felt in need, which was a lot. But to do so regularly helps me find the help from God I need. In and through Jesus.

Note: In the morning and evening offices mentioned above, toward the end we also “Pray together the Prayer Jesus Taught: “Our Father…”

pray for each other, for others, and be prayed for

And pray in the Spirit on all occasions with all kinds of prayers and requests. With this in mind, be alert and always keep on praying for all the Lord’s people.

Ephesians 6:18

…prayer is essential in this ongoing warfare. Pray hard and long. Pray for your brothers and sisters. Keep your eyes open. Keep each other’s spirits up so that no one falls behind or drops out.

Ephesians 6:18; MSG

A big part of what God wants us to do in this life is to pray. It’s interesting how Jesus himself often broke away from his disciples in the silence of the early morning to pray to his Father. We too need times spent in prayer. The morning and evening offices within our new hymnal has been helping me that way.

Little do we understand the impact that will make, if we really pray for each other daily. We all need such prayers. That’s the way God has made it, we are truly in need of each other. And we need to pray for others. God might be prompting us to do such, and we can simply choose to pray for certain people.

We can’t know the precise difference such praying makes, but we do know it does make a difference. We’ll surely sense that. We need to be alert, not just praying regularly, but on occasions when we notice certain things. God will give us the wisdom and help we need in this endeavor. As we gladly receive the prayers of others as well. In and through Jesus.

renewing one’s commitment to prayer

My God, whom I praise,
do not remain silent,
for people who are wicked and deceitful
have opened their mouths against me;
they have spoken against me with lying tongues.
With words of hatred they surround me;
they attack me without cause.
In return for my friendship they accuse me,
but I am a man of prayer.
They repay me evil for good,
and hatred for my friendship.

Psalm 109:1-5

Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.

Colossians 4:2

I have to admit that today I’m discouraged. Partly over circumstances in which there is no needed breakthrough. But just as much if not more over my own failure to remain in prayer the way I ought to, according to the sense I have of calling, faint though it may be, but persistent and clear enough, to simply be in prayer.

David was referring to adversity from others. But he remained in prayer. The inspired utterances which follow, quoted in the New Testament are completely understandable given what he was up against, though some of it is not worthy of a follower of Christ. At the same time God doesn’t tell us to deny our true feelings and thoughts, but to indeed air them out to God, a part of prayer. The rest of David’s prayer (click Psalm 109 link) is interesting. If you consider the rest of Scripture, you can see that God would bring judgment against the evildoers with the desire to bring them mercy in the end, I think the prevailing current we find in the First/Old Testament prophets and elsewhere.

Paul’s word is for Christ followers, for the church, that we’re to be devoted to prayer. I find it too easy to drift away from that. When by God’s grace I’m able to remain in prayer, it’s a gift, really something I find not only enjoyable, but helpful. But such devotion is expressed regardless of how one feels, or what they’re up against. Yes, at times it can wonderfully seem to be a part of us, but at many other times, it’s simply something we do, a practice. But I would like to add it’s like something we enter into so that we become a part of that prayer, and that prayer becomes a part of us. Now I’m going way beyond what I can understand, but the idea is that we’re taken up into the grace and working of God. And that prayer is not just something we practice, but a part of who we are becoming.

We just need to pray, practice that, and enter into this reality. And as Paul tells us elsewhere, remain there.

pray all the time

1 Thessalonians 5:17; MSG

In and through Jesus.

devotion to prayer tied to living in God’s presence

Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.

Colossians 4:2

Recently James Banks spoke to us at Our Daily Bread Ministries on prayer. And specifically on living in God’s presence, or “practicing the presence of God.” It definitely spoke to me, James often referring to his black Labrador who loves nothing more than just being in his company.

Prayer is not just a means to an end. It’s about participation with God in seeing God’s will be done. And it involves dwelling in God’s presence. Jesus’s words about abiding/remaining in him point that direction:

 If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you.

John 15:7

“Remain” here might better be translated “abide.” Concerning the Greek word here, μένω, Bill Mounce writes: “To abide in Christ is to follow his example of a life obedient to the will of God.” As I heard Pastor Darwin Hartman of Pike Mennonite Church suggest recently, arguing along the same lines: while remain might be literally accurate, that comes across as more passive than the context of its usage might suggest. That to abide by something, means adherence to it in a more active sense (my words of what Pastor Darwin said).

Prayer is then dependent on both God and us. We pray, and in a sense are in God’s presence in both speaking to God, as well as being with him. God’s presence is never withdrawn from us, though we often can be withdrawn from him, and not living in God’s favor.

James Banks noted how that his Labrador gets special favors from him, because the Lab is lovingly present with him. Another dog they have doesn’t like to hang out with his master, but is disappointed when he misses out on the treats James gives. That could be an apt analogy of part of the dynamic of prayer. That we want to be near God, that God even appreciates such a longing. And that God honors that in specific ways. In and through Jesus.