a Christian convert = a disciple, follower of Christ

It’s interesting in Acts how converts to Christ are called “disciples” again and again. Dallas Willard wrote and talked about what he called “bar code Christianity.” It’s like you get your free pass to heaven, eternal life because of Christ and what he’s done, and then you go on living life as you please, really your own life, no different than the world, no different than before perhaps, except that you think you are now saved. But that’s not the way of life described in the New Testament for converts to Christ. They each and every one are then considered followers of Christ, his apprentices, yes, “disciples.”

A person might come to Christ in all sincerity, yet fail to be discipled the way they ought to, maybe not at all. That seems all too common, and likely not a problem of just this day and age. There’s the danger in that of drift and disaster, though certainly God can pick up the pieces. There’s at the very least the likelihood that there will be little or no growth into Christ-likeness, which is really at the heart of what discipleship is all about, following our Rabbi, and thus becoming more and more like him. I have to admit for myself that thought seems daunting in itself, especially if I consider my own life and thoughts and attitudes along the way. Not that we tend to put a kind eye on ourselves, indeed we can see all. But it is hard to appreciate the progress one has made and is making. God sees that clearly; we often don’t.

What I can settle happily into is the thought that along with others, I’m a disciple of Christ, facing each new day and situation as his follower. One day and one step at a time: in, under and through Jesus.

Advertisements

come to Jesus just as you are

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

It seems to me that Jesus’s invitation here is clearly to all, and it’s an invitation into rest in a yoke beside him. So it’s a call to discipleship.

Jesus terms it in conditions of being beaten down, tired, weary, worn out. So it’s not like somehow he is calling those who are prepped to go on all eight (or more) cylinders, those doing well because they somehow deserve it, or as if he’s looking for the elite. Not at all. He is looking for the broken and downtrodden, those who may have failed along the way, and who of us hasn’t failed in some ways?

And Jesus doesn’t set any qualifications. Remember who he said is blessed: the poor in spirit, the poor, the meek, yes, those who hunger and thirst after righteousness, the merciful, the pure in heart (disposed to one thing), etc. So it’s not like you think you can dabble in the world, do your own thing, yet come at the same time, like include Jesus in the mix. It’s a call to come as you are, whatever that is, but it’s a call for all of life. Not that life isn’t to be enjoyed. In fact it can only be life to the full in Jesus.

No qualifications are set here by the Lord. He simply invites us to come to him, to take his yoke upon us, and learn from him. Not complicated, but something we must do.

I don’t know about you, but I know I don’t feel qualified. But it’s the ones who think they’re qualified and deserving who actually are not and often not disposed to heed Jesus’s invitation anyhow. Remember the parable of the Pharisee who thanked God about how good he was, and the tax collector who beat his breast and cried out, “God have mercy on me a sinner!” The latter was justified or considered acceptable by God, but the former, not.

This is my goal, to come to Jesus just as I am, and it’s honestly not much except what is broken and lost and disheveled and on and on. But at the same time I come as one who is willing and realizing that this is a call into an apprentice kind of relationship no less with Jesus himself by the Spirit. In and through him.

 

some further thoughts on Jesus’s invitation to rest

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

It is refreshing when living in a culture so individualistic to have Jesus’s personal invitation into rest and full participation with him with the further rest and strength that participation brings. I appreciate our church, and in general all the churches we’ve been a part of. And we’re part of a small group which meets twice a month and once during the summer. And on top of that I work at a ministry and thus am in daily Christian fellowship. But still by and large what the New Testament teaches in regard to what the church is to be is not practiced enough. Our church service has good coffee, good worship in song, great teaching from Scripture on the screen to our campus, so in many ways it’s my cup of tea. As long as I have my ear plugs (and I barely need them, but trying to protect the hearing I have at an older age) I’m good to go. And it helps if in my comfort zone, or just being more or less chronically tired, I don’t doze off.

Jesus’s invitation is no less personal than it was when he made it I assume not only among his disciples, but when teaching the multitudes. It is an invitation open to all, certainly one to enter into a relationship of discipleship we might say. It refers to a double yoke which oxen we’re hitched to. The Lord himself is alongside of us, in the time he taught it in person, but especially fulfilled, even for the people of his day after he would ascend and pour out the Holy Spirit. By the Spirit, he would come to them, and thus this invitation would be fully open to all. (Not to be confused with his actual return, when he comes bodily, bringing heaven to earth.)

This invitation is no less radical than when it was made. It is not only for all of life, but an actual relationship with Christ by the Spirit. In a sense it stands on its own, but in another sense, not. That is, it is a powerful dynamic in and of itself, the Lord being present with us, and directly teaching or at least impacting us in this communion by the Spirit. And it seems that it is indeed a working relationship. It’s about rest, but it’s also about taking up a yoke and moving with the Lord. So it stands on its own that way. But it’s not apart from what Scripture teaches so that we’re to be active in the word day after day.

This is the breath of fresh air we need for ourselves and for our help to and participation with others. In and through Jesus.

a newer venture: finding rest and strength in Jesus through his invitation

At that time Jesus said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do.

“All things have been committed to me by my Father. No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one knows the Father except the Son and those to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:25-30

I was intrigued recently to see a connection in the gospel according to John between our following Jesus, and Jesus following the Father. Seems that what Jesus practiced (I would even say, learned) from the Father was kind of a way of discipleship, that the Father led him in the same way that Jesus leads us. So that our discipleship in following Jesus is rooted in Jesus’s discipleship in following the Father (John 15:9-10; 17:18-19). Jesus was entirely devoted to God, and worshiped God as a human. Yet never ceased being God himself, so that Jesus’s devotion to the Father was nothing new within the eternal Triunity of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. As we see from John’s gospel account that devotion was indeed reciprocated. But that in no way lessens the significance of Jesus’s complete learning from the Father as a human here on earth in this present life. Jesus’s invitation needs to be seen in that backdrop.

But again, for me this is a recent revolutionary development after decades of being a Christian. Not to say I haven’t entered into this many times along with all other believers. But with the possibility that we might be enabled by God’s grace and the Spirit to actually learn to live in this from day to day. Jesus’s invitation seems similar to that which he gave his disciples. It wasn’t meant to be just a one time event, but day after day after day. Of course they were with him nearly three years daily, but what he was promising them here was something even closer and more intimate, we might say, his presence with them and more by the Spirit after his ascension.

Who of us does not become weary and burdened by what often seems to be the relentless and crushing responsibilities of life? There’s so much we can’t control, not the least of which what other people might do. With that the mistakes we make along the way, and it goes on and on. But our Lord’s invitation remains: We’re simply to come to him as those weary and burdened with the promise that he will give us rest. We’re to take his yoke on us and learn from him as those beside him. He is gentle and humble in heart, and we will find rest for our souls. His yoke is easy and his burden is light. We will gain strength to do what we’re called to do in and through him, even through his direct tutelage and walk in his presence with us by the Spirit.

There’s more I would like to share connected with my own story and endeavor to live in this reality. But I end it here, at least for now. Something offered to everyone in and through Jesus.

 

scripture, application and experience

I think the genius of the teaching at the church we initially found to take our grandchildren, and now are a part of ourselves is its combination of scripture, emphasis on application, and getting right down to the nitty-gritty of life, where we live, our experience. And that certainly comes from the teaching gift of the senior pastor, who ably, I’m sure has mentored others, who have their own unique gifting from God in the teaching ministry of this church. And a great teaching ministry, by the way, to the children and young folks.

We really don’t need anything fancy nowadays, just a straight shot of God’s word. But when we receive that, we find not only an appeal to doctrine, but also to application and experience. The so-called Wesleyan Quadrilateral, gathered from John Wesley’s writings, but which Wesley himself would not have approved of, as has recently been brought to light by Methodist theologians: Scripture, tradition, reason, and experience, kind of correlate to this thought. But scripture not only has primacy of place, but a place all by itself. Whatever role tradition, reason, and experience have is all under scripture. Which is why I believe in what our church is seeking to do in helping us grow as disciples of Christ to become more and more like him.

When we go to scripture, we don’t have to worry about drawing this out, if we take scripture itself seriously. Scripture will ably do that for us, if we pay serious attention to it. We just take it for what it is, going through it, letting it, really God’s word do it’s work. Nothing more, nothing less. All of this in and through Jesus.

wannabe disciples

Then he said to them all: “Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me.

Luke 9:23

Dallas Willard in his book, The Divine Conspiracy coined the phrase “bar code Christianity” to describe much of what he saw, the idea of people becoming Christian without becoming true and committed followers of Christ. It’s the thought of believing in Christ so that one’s eternal destiny is settled, but going on to live life as one chooses. Of course we know that one who really has committed their lives to God through Christ will experience the work of the Spirit to help them be satisfied with nothing less than following Christ. There’s truth in that, but at the same time we must beware of complacency which results in an inevitable drift and eventual falling away from the faith, if I read the book of Hebrews correctly.

Jesus made it clear that to be his disciple requires the same commitment to God and in life that he had. The exact same. And there was nothing halfway, except that we know the Lord accepts us just as we are, warts and all, with all our fallibility and predisposition to what is contrary to following him. His disciple Peter is a good example of such. And it’s not like this is something optional, only for those committed, let’s say to a monastic sort of existence. It’s for all, all who would name the name of Christ and be called Christian.

For whoever wants to save their life will lose it, but whoever loses their life for me will save it. What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, and yet lose or forfeit their very self? Whoever is ashamed of me and my words, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his glory and in the glory of the Father and of the holy angels.

Luke 9:24-26

There’s no watering this down. At the same time, I see grace as helping us to fully embrace this call. And the distinction here is quite sharp. You either put all your eggs in one basket or another, living for one’s self, or living for Christ. Perhaps gaining much that the world holds dear, but in the end, losing one’s self. In other words, we find our true self, and our true lives in Christ as opposed to finding it in this world. And it’s an embrace of Christ and his teaching for how we live from day to day.

God’s one call to us in and through Jesus.

leaving superficial comfort behind

“Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I have come to turn

“‘a man against his father,
a daughter against her mother,
a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law—
a man’s enemies will be the members of his own household.’

“Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me; anyone who loves their son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me. Whoever does not take up their cross and follow me is not worthy of me. Whoever finds their life will lose it, and whoever loses their life for my sake will find it.

Matthew 10:34-39

Unfortunately we live in a world that doesn’t welcome the comfort God gives in Jesus. Instead we want our own comfort and the comfort the world affords us. And it’s not comfortable to opt for God’s comfort in Jesus, because to have that comfort means no less than the way of the cross. And a different turn than what people ordinarily opt for.

I know this doesn’t make sense on a natural level. Jesus’s call then sounded just as radical as it does now. Many people followed for a time, but at a certain point when their expectations for comfort were not being met, they no longer followed. And that included many disciples as well, when Jesus lost them with words that didn’t match their expectations (John 6).

I really dislike leaving the comfort of just going with the flow on many things, sometimes on matters which in themselves seem trivial and technical. But I’ve lived long enough to know that “live and let live” is not good, either. It is best to bet one’s entire life on Jesus, then go with that flow. By faith let Jesus’s words, with their verdict hit us right where it hurts. So that we can get the only comfort that will last. And hopefully so others who also are naturally offended, will with us accept that offense, and follow the one who took the offense of the world on himself at the cross. So that all might along with us, believe and follow.