the sin of gluttony

…put a knife to your throat
if you are given to gluttony.

Proverbs 23:2

Winn Collier in a helpful Our Daily Bread Ministries “Discovery Series” booklet entitled, “Walking Free: Overcoming What Keeps Us from Jesus,” covers the so called “seven deadly sins.” It is most helpful in both understanding the actual sins, and what we can do about it, with an accent on God’s grace. See that for an excellent summary look into each, including gluttony.

Gluttony it turns out is more about trying to satisfy the God-vacuum of our hearts with other things, food being just one of them. Of course the actual term gluttony has primarily to do with food, as does fasting.

We want more and more of what’s pleasurable, of what we like. When all the time the greatest pleasure is God and to be in God’s presence. What  is actually the case is that we’re replacing the greatest pleasure, the actual worship of God for what ends up being idolatrous pleasures, such as satisfying our every desire, whatever that might be.

Gluttony is probably akin to greed which is listed in the New Testament as a deadly sin (1 Corinthians 6:9-11). In the Roman Catholic teaching, it along with the other seven sins is listed as a basic sin (not deadly) from which other sins derive. Gluttony ends up being a kind of substitute for the worship and practice of loving God. Instead we’re all taken up with our own cravings, warped as they are due to our sin. And whenever we violate loving God, not loving our neighbor will follow:

Now this was the sin of your sister Sodom: She and her daughters were arrogant, overfed and unconcerned; they did not help the poor and needy.

Ezekiel 16:49

Food and all the other of God’s gifts to us is not the culprit. It’s our own brokenness in putting the gifts above the Giver. We are indeed given all things richly to enjoy (1 Timothy 6:17b). But we are good at becoming obsessed over whatever in the place of God.

Thankfully God is present to help us find our way back to him with repentance and a renewed commitment to leave behind what is destructive to us and to others. To find all that we long for in God, while we enjoy God’s good gifts to us. In and through Jesus.

 

Advertisements

rolling up one’s sleeves and getting to work

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

It’s easy to exist in kind of a limbo in which one is trying to figure out what’s really going on in the world and why, what the best approach to address perceived problems is, etc., etc. That can go on and on, never ending. There’s no end to different opinions and what one can read on so many subjects.

God gives us work as a blessing. Not to be burdened down by it, but to give oneself to the task at hand. And to receive the pleasures of life as well. I like the balance we find in Scripture, and specifically in the book of Ecclesiastes. Work can be a helpful distraction and a tonic in itself from becoming serious in a way that’s not helpful for oneself or anyone else.

The text suggests that too much reflection is not be healthy for one’s well being. We do the best we can, but we’ll never get it all figured out in this life. We should work hard (Ecclesiastes 9:10), then relax and enjoy. Then do that all over again.

All of this a blessing from God. And especially so in and through Jesus.

 

enjoyment/fun as part of the good (godly) life

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

Enjoyment of life is something one of my favorite biblical books, Ecclesiastes, returns to again and again. It is an important part of God’s creation, of being human.

And yet we have been influenced by something less than that which would relegate fun and enjoyment to a secondary status at best, and even questionable or wrong at worst. It’s as if to be godly you can’t enjoy life; yes, you can enjoy God and spiritual things, but nothing else. But this directly contradicts what God’s word clearly says.

God…richly provides us with everything for our enjoyment.

1 Timothy 6:17

We can indeed become “lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God” (2 Timothy 3:4). We can love the gifts of God and not the giver. But to enjoy those gifts is an honor to the giver. To enjoy life and have fun is truly a part of what godliness is all about. A part of the good life God has for us even now when we hold on to such pleasures lightly as we seek to follow Jesus (1 Corinthians 7:29-31). In and through him.

blessed routine

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

There is something it seems like our society wants to get away from, to escape as much as possible, which I actually should be appreciated, if it was recognized for the blessing it is. That is, routine. I’m thinking in terms of regular responsibility, which actually is a privilege to be involved in, and carry on. Instead nowadays, it seems like people want as much freedom and free time as possible. I’m not at all suggesting that there might be better ways to do work, or that we always have to do things the same way. Or that we should work long hours and long weeks, with little time off. No. And there may be new approaches to work that are different and fresh, indeed, helpful.

Usually trouble follows us wherever we go, not just because we’re creating it ourselves hopefully, though that reality exists from which we can learn, even if just from being finite beings. But simply because we live in a broken, fallen world. It seems like if something can “so south,” it will, being hard to keep everything pointed to “the true north” (these sayings from the compass). Due to imperfections everywhere, from nearly every direction, there will be trouble. And that simply becomes a part of the normal routine we have to work on, and live with.

We’re to find satisfaction in all of that, no less, and even, no more. Ecclesiastes suggests that if wealth is added to that, then that’s all well and good, people occupied with gladness of heart, I suppose being able to do this and that, to enjoy life. Whereas those financially strapped, or living in relative poverty may be limited, yet hopefully blessed with a job to make ends meet. Though sadly here in the United States, a living wage is not guaranteed for any forty hour job. One should be able to live in humble quarters, and provide well enough for themselves with a full time job. Life isn’t easy, although some pieces are dropping in to many places, for example in Africa, to help societies and families have work, and provide for their own. The free enterprise system and capitalism are regularly beaten up by many progressives, but in my opinion, are not evil in and of themselves. Any system can become wrong, or more accurately have many wrongs because of the people who are in charge and in place in them.

Continuing on in the blessed routine, in whatever God gives us, should be something we learn to appreciate. For some of us, retirement age is approaching. If God gives us health, that can be a step into another blessed routine, of day in and day out, doing much the same things, hopefully to our own enjoyment, and even delight, and for the blessing of others. As we continue on as witnesses in all of this, to the truth and power of the good news of God in Jesus.

 

accepting one’s lot

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

It probably has taken me quite a while, but I think I’ve finally come around to begin to completely accept my lot in life with all the challenges and disappointments that come along my way. Life is like that; it is not some kind of dream vacation. Rather it is the hum-drum of challenge, effort, setback, failure at times, more effort, repentance all along the way, and remaining at it day after day.

And then there’s all the good that comes, if we could just see it. Wrapped up in the gifts God gives us, like the good wife I have, the grandchildren, the good I see in our daughter, the provisions God gives us to live and enjoy life.

Yes, in my case I would have liked to have been a pastor or teacher, but it didn’t pan out for this reason or that. I still maybe have some faint glimmers of dreaming about what I would like to see in whatever more days God allots to me. But above all, I want to more and more not only accept, but embrace whatever God gives me, and whatever place I find myself in. Knowing that God is good and that he will provide and help us as we seek to help others and be a blessing. In and through Jesus.

discipline and enjoyment

Work requires discipline. Discipline simply put is follow through by doing what needs to be done to fulfill one’s responsibilities or commitments.

We live in an age which is driven in large part by feelings. If we feel like doing something, we do it; if we don’t feel like it, we don’t. Of course that doesn’t work in the work a day world. You get up and go to work whether you feel like it, or want to, or not. Some of the most fulfilling things I do are in spite of how I feel at the time before, and sometimes even during doing it.

When we don’t have to do anything, we often gravitate to that which is okay and even good, up to a point. What entertains us, what we actually want to do. That’s not to say that we won’t want to do what is good for us to do, take for example in my case, Bible reading. I can thorougly enjoy reading the Bible, especially slowly and thoughtfully, and hopefully prayerfully. I find that things which are okay in themselves which I enjoy doing can actually crowd out the better things, such as Bible reading. Everything has its place, and we do well to enjoy everything we might say, in its place.

What is desired perhaps is to achieve some rhythm which somehow balances the  need to enjoy with the work required to enjoy it. The very best things in life require commitment on our part along with effort to do well, and in a sense finish the work. There is so much left undone, so much potential for good not realized simply due to lack of discipline. Behind lack of discipline may be lack of vision. But one’s discipline can help them find vision. So lacking vision is not a reason to lack discipline. We desire that which is good, therefore we make every effort to achieve or gain it.

Above all practically speaking, we do well to learn to plod along and keep at it, as opposed to a brilliant dash of light in which we achieve or receive something great and good. No, we keep plugging away with discipline, asking for the Lord’s help that we might learn where true, lasting enjoyment lies.