God’s judgment as good news

In the Bible, judgment mostly comes across as good news, or at least that’s a large swath of its teaching. One sees that over and over again in the psalms: God is going to root out the wicked and destroy them, maybe even in a way which not only brings them shame, but actually causes them to seek his face, whatever that might possibly mean in the hidden scheme of things. The backdrop of this is God’s care for the poor, the oppressed, the bereaved, as well as for his people. The day of God’s judgment, called the day of the Lord (LORD, or Yahweh in the First/Old Testament) is coming.

In the Bible, judgment always precedes salvation. We all end up being judged in some way, but God in Jesus takes the judgment for sin on himself by suffering death, even at the hands of sinners, and through that death providing the way for forgiveness and eternal life for all who believe. When Jesus returns, he will rid the earth of all evil to bring in the full salvation, somehow all of this being a new creation in the fullness of the kingdom of God.

We were raised on the version of God’s judgment as something to fear and even be ashamed of. How could a loving God pour out judgment on the earth? Admittedly some of the lines and passages in the prophets show a passion on this which seems extreme. Though one has to remember the nature of prophetic writing, how exaggeration to make a point is accepted, and not to be taken strictly literally. We in this culture with any knowledge of Christian history remember Jonathan Edwards’s famous sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.” Heaven and hell once dominated the American Christian theological landscape in the Christian understanding within the churches. At least it was a dominant theme.

But we do much better to let that recede, and what actually is in the wave of biblical teaching appear. It may not appeal to the world, or to those coming up with some kind of new theology, but it will deal forthrightly with things as they are by a God who is completely good and pure love. As we remember the salvation provided in Jesus from all of the destruction to come, to bring us into the goodness of God’s judgment, both for ourselves individually and for the world in and through Jesus.

follow the Spirit (and do not trust yourself)

Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.

1 Peter 4

Jakob Ammann led the split which became the Amish. I admire his story and zeal to promote a Christianity and church true to the words of scripture. At one point, as I recall, he even temporarily excommunicated or at least disciplined himself for what he thought was a breach of scripture, failing to fulfill one of its teachings.

It is easy to take on that mindset. To think that somehow we can navigate our own lives as Christians. Yes, with the help of the Spirit, but we essentially are in charge.

Yesterday, I ran across this quote from Oswald Chambers:

Beware of counterfeiting the love of God by following your own natural human emotions, sympathies, or understandings.

Instead of thinking we can come up with the solution to some difficult issue, and honing in on one passage which seems to be the answer, we need to step back, consider all of scripture, trust the Holy Spirit, and not trust in ourselves. We need to let the Spirit lead. A part of this is to consider what the church has taught, as well, a given, but something I should mention.

And the passage quoted above from 1 Peter, seems to me to be one of those key passages of scripture from which the Spirit might work for other needed things to happen. Of course God knows what is needed; we might think we know, but only God knows all, and everything the way it needs to be known. God gives us understanding, and will guide us by the Spirit through the word in and through Jesus, as we trust in him.

God’s cross-shaped love

This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins.

1 John 4

In our culture, today, we celebrate romantic love in Valentine’s Day, and surely we do well to do so (see Song of Songs). C. S. Lewis’s great book, The Four Loves, comes to mind as well.

In the very passage quoted above from 1 John 4, we read more than once that “God is love.” The God who is love shows to us and to the world a cross-shaped love, that is, the love of the Cross. In Jesus, God’s Son, is the ultimate expression of love. God took upon God’s Self all of our evil, all of our sin, and in love laid down his life for us, yes, for the world.

We receive that love so as to enjoy it, live in it, and from that actually be a manifestation of that love of God in Christ to the world. It is not us, but Christ living in us (Galatians 2:20) who enables us so to live, but mysteriously this becomes (or can and should become) a part and at the heart of who we are. As Paul said, he wanted to know Christ and the power of his resurrection, and participation in his sufferings, even becoming like him in his death (Philippians 3). Christ’s love compelled him in his mission and life (2 Corinthians 5).

We want to enjoy every aspect of what love is, of course not outside of what God commands. But above all, our focus is on the Love of all loves, found in God, and on the Cross, in which love is given its supreme and final expression in this world. The love of God to bring us into no less than the life and love of the Trinity. In and through Jesus.

just because

God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them. This is how love is made complete among us so that we will have confidence on the day of judgment: In this world we are like Jesus. There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. The one who fears is not made perfect in love.

We love because he first loved us.

1 John 4

We depend on reason, yet we often really are not all that reasonable as in logical and consistent in our reasoning. When it’s all said and done, Christianity is the most reasonable of all faiths because of Jesus’s resurrection from the dead (see review of a chapter written by N. T. Wright, entitled, “Can a Scientist Believe in the Resurrection?”). I don’t want to fall into a John Locke Enlightenment scheme, in which our faith is in lock step with rationalism. But the faith is not irrational, even if it is definitely suprarational, transcending it as well.

The problem for us with our rationality is in large part the confidence we tend to want to put in it. So that certainty (certitude) can become more or less an idol to us. If we can just be certain about this or that, then we can find rest, and all can be good in our world. Where is God in that equation? And if there is a God, and specifically, the God of the Bible, who knows anything in comparison with God? (See the book of Job.) God alone knows everything, and we know nothing at all like God knows it. It is easy to understand how people fall into rationalism and become inherent skeptics (see the book of Ecclesiastes) apart from faith in God. But for us who have faith in God, such a stance is ironically irrational indeed.

Scripture calls us to a faith in God, no less. Not in reason, not even in our own God-given reason, although in this call, scripture appeals to reason. The only rational choice for us who have faith is to trust the One who knows the end from the beginning, and the depths of everything in between, and knows exactly what is going on, and why, and God’s purposes in it all.

Trust in the Lord with all your heart
    and lean not on your own understanding;
in all your ways submit to him,
    and he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 3

“Just because.” We trust in God because we know that God alone knows it all, that God in and through Jesus, has our backs (and our fronts and sides), and above all, because “God is love.” Being love, God wants us to live in that love, as well as in the faith, all of this in and through Jesus.

And so that is where I land today, and hopefully everyday in whatever time I have left. Thankful that it doesn’t depend on me, and on me getting it, but in the God who is love. In and through Jesus. And somehow, “just because.”

does God love people no matter what they do? who is the God who is love?

Scripture clearly says that God hates evildoers, specifically those who victimize others such as the poor. Yet it also says that God is not willing that any should perish, that God takes no pleasure in the death of the wicked, wanting them to repent and live. I don’t believe there’s any sinner or sin which can’t be forgiven through God’s grace in Jesus.

God’s jealousy may be with reference to God’s infinite, cascading love. When people don’t give God something of the honor due him, or worship other gods in their hearts and lives, then God’s jealousy is aroused.

God is grieved when God’s people sin against him and others in their attitudes and actions, especially when they fail to love each other as Christ has loved us. That too is an expression of God’s love.

God in his love pursues us, and wants us to experience that love and be changed by it. So as to love out of being loved. God wants us to live in the same love that marks God as Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The same love shown to us and to the world in Jesus in his Incarnation, life and teachings, death and resurrection. Especially prominent and made known in Jesus’s death on the cross. That is how much God loves; God died on the cross in the Person of the Son.

Yes, God’s love goes on. But what is our response to that love? By what theologians call prevenient grace, God enables us hopeless and lost sinners to open our hearts to God’s heart through the gospel, the good news in Jesus. The question becomes not whether God loves everyone or not, because even though he may hate for a time, it seems to me from scripture that eventually God’s longing love wins out, and he would woo even the worst of sinners to himself. The question turns in on us. Will we respond? And the danger is that we will grow careless and hard hearted, so that we can be in danger of sinning against the work of the Spirit in prevenient grace, and thus close the door to God’s love for us, and perhaps seal our fate by our own choice.

Yes, no matter what, God is love, and God loves. That is shown within scripture and supremely and climactically in Jesus himself. We need to learn to read scripture and see all of life in that light. And let that change us even toward enemies. Changed by the love of God in Jesus who is love, that we might begin to live and grow in that love toward each other and everyone else.

love is not enough

This post from a professor and scholar in Ireland, Patrick Mitchell, on a book entitled: Love: a History, by Simon May, along with the post’s apt title, “The idolisation of love,” looks promising. This reminds me of the Beatles song with typically great music and empty lyrics, All You Need is Love. Love per se (by itself) is not enough.

Yes, “God is love,” as seen in 1 John 4. But the context itself gives the lie to the statement that love is enough, or even that love is the gospel. Compare what is meant by that, with the picture as given in scripture:

Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God.Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love. This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him.This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete in us.

And this, from 2 John:

The elder,

To the lady chosen by God and to her children, whom I love in the truth—and not I only, but also all who know the truth—because of the truth, which lives in us and will be with us forever:

Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and from Jesus Christ, the Father’s Son, will be with us in truth and love.

It has given me great joy to find some of your children walking in the truth, just as the Father commanded us. And now, dear lady, I am not writing you a new command but one we have had from the beginning. I ask that we love one another. And this is love: that we walk in obedience to his commands. As you have heard from the beginning, his command is that you walk in love.

Read 1, 2 and 3 John, those three letters (not long) for a more contextual and fuller picture.

And to help make sure there’s no mistake as to what’s meant here, Romans 13:

Let no debt remain outstanding, except the continuing debt to love one another, for whoever loves others has fulfilled the law.The commandments, “You shall not commit adultery,” “You shall not murder,” “You shall not steal,” “You shall not covet,”and whatever other command there may be, are summed up in this one command: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Love does no harm to a neighbor. Therefore love is the fulfillment of the law.

While there is overlap in the love of God, and the love we see in creation, according to scripture that’s not enough. We need the new creation love in Jesus and the gospel, which is to heal and put together the brokenness of the old creation, which for all it’s devotion to love, fails to worship the One-in-Three, or Three-in-One, the One who is love.

The true love is a gospel love, no less, grounded in the crucified, risen Jesus, and in the truth which includes absolutes such as “Thou shalt not kill.” It is not enough to think that love is all we need, or that love is the gospel. We turn to the one God as revealed through scripture, and in actual events, in Jesus. We find the one true, lasting love there, from which all other loves come, and are judged.

 

love one another

Dear friends, let us love one another, for love comes from God. Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God.Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love. This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him.This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. Dear friends, since God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has ever seen God; but if we love one another, God lives in us and his love is made complete in us.

1 John 4

There is nothing more important, foundational, or basic to our life in Christ than to love one another, even as God in Christ has loved us.

This does take effort on our part, but that effort is out of the grace through which this new life is given to us by God through Christ. It is a gift in and through which we live.

We must not draw back and give up and give in to lesser, even base things, which come from the brokenness of sin and out of our broken humanity. And because our love will never measure up in degree to God’s love, we might lose heart.

In the gift, we end up sharing in the very love of God, so that we both receive from and give to each other something of that love. But because all too often, and by and large we don’t love that well, we can too easily be prone to throw in the towel and give up altogether. But God won’t let us stay there. One way or another, we’re brought back to this requirement, indeed imperative necessity of love, because that is the life that is ours in Christ. There is no other life in him.

And so we must be committed to God and to each other in that love. To look for growth in it in our lives with each other and with others in tangible, down to earth ways. To get rid of all that is contrary to that love, whatever it might be. And together to live out this love of God in Jesus as a witness of God’s love in and through Jesus for the world.