willing to live with feet in the air

One never knows what a day will bring forth (see the book of Job). Yet there’s nothing new under the sun (Ecclesiastes). Things are set in place, the only difference being variations of the same.

I’m not one that’s fond of heights, though I have gotten up when I have to. I like safety, feet on the ground. Real life and the life of faith seem to involve feet in the air, unpredictability in place. Not that feet on the ground is completely safe, either.

The life of faith in this world involves an element of uncertainty. We don’t know what we’re going to face from day to day, week to week, month to month, year to year, and beyond. But with that there’s the certainty that faith brings. God is faithful, and God’s promises in Jesus for us and for the world are true, trustworthy, and certain.

So no matter what today or tomorrow might bring forth, God will see us through if we only trust in him. In and through Jesus.

 

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in process open ended

Life is strange in the sense that as you go on you realize certain things will remain the same, but that the unexpected is inevitable. So that should lend a certain kind of stability in the midst of change.

By faith Abraham, when called to go to a place he would later receive as his inheritance, obeyed and went, even though he did not know where he was going.

Hebrews 11:8

God is faithful, God’s promises are certain, fulfilled in Jesus. But life is uncertain. We don’t really know what will happen from one day to the next, or what the outcome will be. Except again that God will keep his promises in Jesus. And so by faith we carry on.

It’s like a wild ride at an adventure park. You  believe you’re safe, and that you’ll arrive at “home” in the end, but getting there is another thing altogether. And it seems to me we’d all be much better off realizing this is true throughout life. We’re in process, and it’s open ended, but with an altogether good destination. In and through Jesus.

 

looking back at 2018 and forward to 2019

I remember my affliction and my wandering,
the bitterness and the gall.
I well remember them,
and my soul is downcast within me.
Yet this I call to mind
and therefore I have hope:

Because of the Lord’s great love we are not consumed,
for his compassions never fail.
They are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.
I say to myself, “The Lord is my portion;
therefore I will wait for him.”

The Lord is good to those whose hope is in him,
to the one who seeks him;
it is good to wait quietly
for the salvation of the Lord.

Lamentations 3:19-26

I’m not sure how many people actually look back to consider the past year, and then look forward in anticipation to what the next year will bring. Or even if very many see any value in that. Speaking for myself, I think in time’s past I’ve not seen much value in such an exercise, and didn’t see the change from December to January as anything more than a new calendar, parties for some, but for us or at least for myself, time off work.

This would be a personal exercise, not one you would want to necessarily write on and share. I’m sure for some of us the past year may have had parts we would rather forget, or maybe so bad that we’ll never fully get over it. Just heal with the remaining scars, painful at times, and go on. For others there may have been breakthroughs and some good results. Probably for most of us there’s a mixture of some of both.

Life is a journey, and the life of faith no less so. We do well to ask ourselves how we’re doing, whether or not we’re progressing in our walk with God. What improvements we’re making and what we still need to work on.

Challenges will lie ahead, but faith enables us to look forward to God’s answer to our prayers, so that we live in hope, anticipation of what God is going to do. And we certainly think in terms not just of ourselves, but of others. What does God have in store for our loved ones, our families? Our friends? Our churches? Our neighborhood, area, state, nation, indeed the world?

We can know that through it all, whatever new challenges we face, God is faithful. We can look to God in faith, knowing he will see us through. We do need to be in scripture, and in the fellowship of the church. But along with that, it’s our own personal interaction with God that will make the difference. Even as was the case with the writer of Lamentations.

We look back on the old year with thanksgiving for all God has done. And we look forward to what is yet to come, what God has in store and how he is going to work through whatever comes our way. In and through Jesus.

 

the world: tailor made for worriers

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

The more you know, the more you wish you didn’t know. That’s a truism which too often is an explanation on why we can so easily be on edge. I used to live that way, just waiting for the next trouble that would bring me down into the abyss of worry. I’ve learned to accept the reality that this world is filled with problems galore, that there won’t be any end to them, and that we will make all kinds of mistakes along the way, and that to some extent, whatever decision we make is more or less a guess. We can’t know everything, though we work for as assured an outcome as possible.

While the world is tailor made for worriers, and I would categorize myself as one of them, it is also an opportunity for trusting in God regardless of what we run up against and the challenges which come our way, as well as when the bottom actually does fall out sometimes. We can learn to trust God in the midst of all of that: before, during, and after the mess. That God is great and God is good. And therefore will take care of everything. So that although we need to be present and somehow engaged, if only by waiting, we can be assured that God is at work for what ultimately is to be a good outcome.

There is evil in the world, and tragedy. We see it around us at times, and especially are aware of it through the news media. It is inevitable in this life, and often brings with it tragic devastation which touches the lives of people, including children. We decry such, but we are often just so wrapped up in our own world and troubles. It would be good for us to expand, and have to pray to God about tragedies in such places as Yemen and elsewhere.

One of our problems is we struggle with living in the kind of world and existence in which we live. Instead, we need to accept the matter of fact reality of it all. But along with that, the strong loving care of our Father. God will take care of everything, including the smallest details of our lives, if we just commit them all in faith to him. That certainly takes effort on our part. Bottom line: We need to grow in our certainty of the personal love of our good and great God. That God is our Father in and through Jesus. And has a good outcome in mind for everything in the end. And so we look to him in prayer, trying to grow so that our own propensity for worry becomes less and less, and our trust in him, more and more. In and through Jesus.

how faith is confirmed

Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for.

By faith we understand that the universe was formed at God’s command, so that what is seen was not made out of what was visible.

By faith Abel brought God a better offering than Cain did. By faith he was commended as righteous, when God spoke well of his offerings. And by faith Abel still speaks, even though he is dead.

Hebrews 11:1-4

Frankly, as far as I’m concerned, faith is a struggle in this life. It is challenged on nearly every turn. The great passage on faith in Hebrews 11 to the beginning of Hebrews 12 begins with the confidence and blessed assurance that faith brings along with how we know by faith. But it doesn’t end there. The rest of the chapter is about how people who had such faith lived. They acted on that faith.

I think faith normally involves a process. We pray and hear, or perhaps hear and pray; we respond with some kind of inner “amen” to what we believe is from God. And then we act on that prayer in some sort of specific way, even as we see in the many instances of Hebrews 11 (click link above). Certainly a changed life is involved, and is touched on in this passage when we consider Moses by faith forsaking the treasures of Egypt for a greater reward and seeing him who is unseen. But by and large the passage is filled with acts of faith.

It does no one any good to have some sort of, shall we say, feel good experience, or sense what they should do, unless it is acted on and done. It’s not at all like we should try to do something to either prove we have faith, or even bring faith about. Not at all. We need to be those who act from faith so that there needs to be some kind of confidence, assurance, and understanding which precedes such an act.

Yes, we should not be hasty. We should have a certain firm settledness in what we’re supposed to do. But then we must follow through and do it. Confident in God’s faithfulness, that God will see us through to the very end. As we await the fulfillment of all that our faith will bring, which includes the growth of our faith in this life, as well as good outcomes in God’s blessing through it. In and through Jesus.

 

life is a journey

At Aretha Franklin’s passing, and considering her life, I am reminded that life is a journey. We may think we’re in a bad spot at the moment, but it goes on. In Aretha’s case, it was with the Lord, so that she is now with him in glory. It was not without trauma, and wasn’t easy, and ended on a most difficult note.

A journey is not static, as we might wish; I mean finding a good point, and staying there. It’s dynamic with change, and that can be difficult. And it’s essentially a journey. You just don’t arrive in this life. You have to keep on going, because time along with all the changes that brings won’t stop.

That can be good, because there can be periods and times we’re ashamed of, or not fond of to say the least. We just keep on going, learning to depend on the Lord to not only see us through, but in him, to be victorious. To become more and more like him. A needed encouragement indeed, in and through Jesus.

God’s faithfulness no matter what

Habakkuk has always been an interesting book to me, some memorable lines, but most of all just the entire letter. The sky was falling, things really bad, especially with what was right in their face: injustice and unfaithfulness on the home front, and what seemed even worse looming on the horizon from an empire on the move, the Babylonians.

I guess it depends somewhat on one’s perspective, but it seem like the sky is falling to many. It’s certainly not an easy time for a good number of people. There are not only concerns, but surely much that needs to be done. And in a certain sense that seems ongoing in this life. All one has to do is open up a good, substantive history book, and one can see that troubles await on every turn, that there’s little that seems to turn out entirely right, that with the good, there’s always the not so good, and sometimes even evil.

And this is not to slap those on the wrist who are activists, and tell them to simmer down, that everything will somehow be okay in the end. There certainly is a time to speak out, as well as to be silent. This is not at all to challenge someone who might be an important player in what’s going on.

But it’s simply to say that God is faithful no matter what. That God is at work in the world: our world, the world around us, and the world at large. And like with the prophet Habakkuk, in ways that we can’t imagine or conceive. Not that everything is good in the end. And not that we don’t bear some responsibility, either. But God is at work to judge and bring salvation.

Habakkuk couldn’t see that, nor would he have if God would have shown him. It evidently would have made no sense to him; he would not have been able to track with it. I think oftentimes that’s a major part of my problem. I want to somehow see the light somewhere, which is certainly at the end of the tunnel. But I can’t. And I can’t begin to see the larger picture like God does. Perhaps what I need to envision in my mind is an empty canvas, with God being the one who is painting, perhaps over coloring which seems dark and meaningless, perhaps even chaotic. And God might use our hand a bit in the painting, most likely so if we’re open to that.

God is at work in the world. It’s important for us to trust God no matter what, and to remain in faith in God’s covenant faithfulness in Jesus. And to worship. Just as Habakkuk did in his day, the letter bearing his name preserved for us to be translated into our day. In and through Jesus.