life is a journey

At Aretha Franklin’s passing, and considering her life, I am reminded that life is a journey. We may think we’re in a bad spot at the moment, but it goes on. In Aretha’s case, it was with the Lord, so that she is now with him in glory. It was not without trauma, and wasn’t easy, and ended on a most difficult note.

A journey is not static, as we might wish; I mean finding a good point, and staying there. It’s dynamic with change, and that can be difficult. And it’s essentially a journey. You just don’t arrive in this life. You have to keep on going, because time along with all the changes that brings won’t stop.

That can be good, because there can be periods and times we’re ashamed of, or not fond of to say the least. We just keep on going, learning to depend on the Lord to not only see us through, but in him, to be victorious. To become more and more like him. A needed encouragement indeed, in and through Jesus.

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God’s faithfulness no matter what

Habakkuk has always been an interesting book to me, some memorable lines, but most of all just the entire letter. The sky was falling, things really bad, especially with what was right in their face: injustice and unfaithfulness on the home front, and what seemed even worse looming on the horizon from an empire on the move, the Babylonians.

I guess it depends somewhat on one’s perspective, but it seem like the sky is falling to many. It’s certainly not an easy time for a good number of people. There are not only concerns, but surely much that needs to be done. And in a certain sense that seems ongoing in this life. All one has to do is open up a good, substantive history book, and one can see that troubles await on every turn, that there’s little that seems to turn out entirely right, that with the good, there’s always the not so good, and sometimes even evil.

And this is not to slap those on the wrist who are activists, and tell them to simmer down, that everything will somehow be okay in the end. There certainly is a time to speak out, as well as to be silent. This is not at all to challenge someone who might be an important player in what’s going on.

But it’s simply to say that God is faithful no matter what. That God is at work in the world: our world, the world around us, and the world at large. And like with the prophet Habakkuk, in ways that we can’t imagine or conceive. Not that everything is good in the end. And not that we don’t bear some responsibility, either. But God is at work to judge and bring salvation.

Habakkuk couldn’t see that, nor would he have if God would have shown him. It evidently would have made no sense to him; he would not have been able to track with it. I think oftentimes that’s a major part of my problem. I want to somehow see the light somewhere, which is certainly at the end of the tunnel. But I can’t. And I can’t begin to see the larger picture like God does. Perhaps what I need to envision in my mind is an empty canvas, with God being the one who is painting, perhaps over coloring which seems dark and meaningless, perhaps even chaotic. And God might use our hand a bit in the painting, most likely so if we’re open to that.

God is at work in the world. It’s important for us to trust God no matter what, and to remain in faith in God’s covenant faithfulness in Jesus. And to worship. Just as Habakkuk did in his day, the letter bearing his name preserved for us to be translated into our day. In and through Jesus.

our Father will take care of it

Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?

Matthew 6

Anyone who knows me well knows I can be prone to worry. Although I’ve come a long way in overcoming it, mostly by dealing with it much better. But also by being in the word, in scripture, which helps prevent its onset since our minds are occupied elsewhere. And where they’re occupied when we’re in scripture is in terms of God’s will, which is actually good, and in terms of the real world in which we live, which is wonderful, yet also fraught with danger and death, not to mention degradation.

Jesus’s words in the Sermon on the Mount can help us with the realization that our lives are in the Father’s hands (link above). God will let nothing pass through other than that which he allows. And there honestly is mystery in that. Why are some beset with problems, and at times, even disasters, while others seem to live long, relatively trouble free lives? We don’t know, but we have to trust that God will work good out of what always will be evil. And that God redeems, and can indeed rescue. We pray, and ask God for his help for ourselves and others. And above all, we seek to entrust ourselves, our lives, our all, and especially our loved ones into the tender hands of the Father’s care. In and through Jesus.

the Lord’s faithfulness to his servants

At my first defense, no one came to my support, but everyone deserted me. May it not be held against them. But the Lord stood at my side and gave me strength, so that through me the message might be fully proclaimed and all the Gentiles might hear it. And I was delivered from the lion’s mouth. The Lord will rescue me from every evil attack and will bring me safely to his heavenly kingdom. To him be glory for ever and ever. Amen.

2 Timothy 4:16-18

To be a servant of Christ truly, is such a high and holy calling. Nothing should get in the way of that call, although a servant will want to do well by their family, if they’re wise. We have at least one biblical examples of a good servant who evidently may not have been as good when it came to his family. I’m thinking of Samuel in the Old Testament. Not that the children of all such servants might not lose their way for a time. But too often such servants can be neglectful of their families in their busy schedule of serving others. We need to try to be really present, both in terms of quality and quantity time with our children, and spouses. Yet there is little doubt that there will be some price they have to pay, as well as ourselves, to fulfill what God has called us to do.

Paul had the advantage of having no such ties, evidently having no immediate family of his own. Perhaps as a Pharisee he had a wife, but she evidently had died, because it is clear from the New Testament that he was not married when he wrote his letters (see 1 Corinthians 7). But Paul still had friends who served with him, and he needed companionship. And this was probably especially the case during trying and difficult times.

Paul was on trial because of his proclamation of the gospel, and had been abandoned by everyone, evidently because of their fear of being identified with him with their lives possibly at stake. Most of us today can’t really identify with that. But what we can understand is the sense of being alone, of others not in the work with us, maybe having a hard time finding anyone to serve where needed at all. And yet we can press on time and time again, often not really feeling like it, but still wanting to do it. And we find over and over again, that the Lord is faithful and stands with us. That somehow he is present, and through us he blesses others. That is what Paul experienced, and it is for all of us who endeavor to faithfully serve Christ, even when oftentimes, it’s not convenient. The Lord is faithful. And he will be with us to the very end, as in our weakness, we endeavor to be a faithful servant of his to others, come what may. All in and through him.

 

 

finishing well

Are we there at the end? No matter what happened midway, or even at the beginning. Someone may have had a great start in their faith, with seemingly endless possibilities. Yet somehow or another didn’t take hold of the help they needed, and stumbled badly midway. And it may have taken some time to recover, and get over. It could be any number of things. The point is that one did not continue well in their faith, and suffered loss as a result, which probably in some way or another has impact the rest of their life.

There’s a lot involved in finishing well; look at the entire Bible. But at the heart of it for us in Jesus, is the fact that we are in Jesus, usually in scripture: “in Christ.” That we have the promise of God’s faithful work in our lives to be completed when Jesus returns (Philippians 1:6). Too often though, we look at that as if it’s automatic. God is faithful for sure, and we often are not. But the context in that Philippians passage makes it clear that this is contingent upon us. Paul was referring to those who had become partners with him in the gospel. At least their lives being a witness to the gospel’s truth, impact and power.

We need the will and determination to keep going after this no matter what. Knowing we can only do so in Christ Jesus in God’s will with the Spirit’s help. So that in the end, we’ll be there along with many others. Finishing well. Maybe beaten up and bloodied, or just plain sore. But there, in and through Jesus.

a good prayer when not knowing what to do

11 Teach me your way, Lord,
    that I may rely on your faithfulness;
give me an undivided heart,
    that I may fear your name.

Psalm 86

There are times when we’re at a loss on what to do in a given matter. We might have inclinations, and we probably most certainly know what we would like to see happen. Though sometimes that may not even be the case.

Something important for us to learn is to pray, pray, and keep on praying. Psalm 86 is a prayer from beginning to end. The psalmist is in trouble; his very life being threatened by enemies. The psalm is attributed as a prayer of David, so that such circumstances are no surprise.

I usually know what I would like to do, and I’ve oftentimes done it, probably with mixed results at best. But I’m learning to hold back and simply pray, and keep praying. Maybe the answer from God will come sooner or later. And it likely won’t be an answer I would have come up with, or even be capable of coming up with. And with God guiding the process, God gives the grace to carry it out, something else not as true when we’re less dependent on God.

In the passage from the psalm above, that snippet of the prayer could be interpreted in reference to a specific situation, which actually was the case in the psalm. And it can also be an ongoing prayer for all of life. But in keeping with the psalm itself, it was offered when the psalmist was up against it in a particular situation.

For God to teach us his way means to do something in a different way than we ordinarily would do. It’s the desire to walk in God’s truth, or rely on his faithfulness, either one being true to the Hebrew in its translation. I’m not sure which one I would choose if I would study the text and context, and it’s never a matter (or might be rarely) of both being meant at the same time. To walk in God’s truth is so basic, yet not to be taken for granted. We easily deviate from that in our thoughts and attitudes. And to rely on God’s faithfulness is also crucial for us, because since we can count on God, why do we take matters in our own hands, even when it seems necessary to do so?

The prayer for an undivided heart that the psalmist might fear or reverence God’s name is also important. In the trial or whatever it is we’re facing, sins like pride might be uncovered. There might be a sifting, refining process going on. God might be just as concerned with the process as with the answer. Both likely go together, so that we’re changed, and therefore can live better in the outcome, even if it’s not what we would choose.

Something I’m working on, and trying to walk through. In and through Jesus.

God’s warning and provision in the face of temptation

These things happened to them as examples and were written down as warnings for us, on whom the culmination of the ages has come. So, if you think you are standing firm, be careful that you don’t fall! No temptation[c] has overtaken you except what is common to humankind. And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted[d] beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted,[e] he will also provide a way out so that you can endure it.

1 Corinthians 10:11-13

1 Corinthians 10 is an interesting passage in considering how the Old Testament relates to us today. It is pretty drastically direct, actually. Of course there are important differences. The baptism of God’s people of old was through the Red Sea, their God-given escape from the Egyptians through that miracle. Our baptism is by water accompanying our faith in Jesus, or in infant baptism, anticipating such faith. They also ate the same spiritual food and drink, probably meaning all of them at that time, but maybe including us to some extent, since Christ is said to have been with them. But God was not pleased with most of them because of their sin. And they suffered the consequences of that sin.

And then our passage quoted above: We are not above this possibility, even though we live in a different time, and we could say the time of grace as opposed to law. But while the law was given during that time, grace most certainly was with God’s people as well. And it’s not like we live without boundary lines set, if I read the New Testament correctly, even considering Paul’s letters alone.

The crux of the matter is that we need to not only take sin seriously, but refuse to think we’re above giving into whatever temptation may come our way. Of course God could block every such occasion, but chooses not to. We would have to be removed from the world, or lose our respect from God as being moral agents at least as it seems required at this present time, for that to be the case.

But the promise seems to be that God won’t let it become unbearable, but will provide the way of escape for us, that we might be able to endure such. This suggests to me that escape is an important, even critical way of dealing with temptation, if we are to avoid falling into the sin that would ensnare us. We look to God, to God’s faithfulness, and while doing so, find our escape from that the allure of that temptation. And not just once, but the rest of our lives.

Nothing fancy here, but clear enough I think. And critical for us. As we remain in the word and press on together in the grace and truth that is ours in Jesus.