trials, an open door

Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything. If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. But when you ask, you must believe and not doubt, because the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That person should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. Such a person is double-minded and unstable in all they do.

James 1:2-8

Trials seem to come like a door slammed in our face. I don’t care for any of them myself. But I’m beginning to learn the problem is more in my reaction than in the actual trial itself. Not at all to diminish the problem of the trials, and especially some of them. Usually they don’t involve life changes, but sometimes they do. You can be sure that the Lord does not think lightly of our trials; in all our distresses, he too is stressed (Isaiah 63:9).

It’s my reaction that’s the problem. I might take it to God in prayer, but at the same time act as if the answer to the problem depends entirely on me, that somehow I have to get to the bottom of it. It’s not like we throw our brain away, and toss knowledge to the wind. But where does our dependence lie? As Bill Gaultiere pointed out, we can either do it our way, or Jesus’s way, the way our Lord would direct us to do it.

James tells us to count it all joy because trials open up a door for us toward maturity in Christ. We’re especially glad when we get through them on the other side. But even when we enter them, as an act of faith we need to thank God for what God is going to bring about through them. That is part of the necessary answer: not just what God is able to do, but our reception of that through faith.

Often I’ve left James’s words about doubt out when reflecting on this passage, but I include them here because after all, they’re in the text. There can be the struggle of faith as it’s been called, and it’s not like we’re not tempted to doubt. But we need to act in faith apart from our feelings and how we’ve been conditioned to see everything so negatively and apart from God. As we ask the Lord for needed wisdom, we believe in him, that he will generously give it to us. And instead of doubting, we open ourselves up to receive that help from the Lord.

Something I’m working on myself. In and through Jesus.

when faced with a difficult situation, the need for wisdom

If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you.

James 1

Now two prostitutes came to the king and stood before him. One of them said, “Pardon me, my lord. This woman and I live in the same house, and I had a baby while she was there with me. The third day after my child was born, this woman also had a baby. We were alone; there was no one in the house but the two of us.

“During the night this woman’s son died because she lay on him. So she got up in the middle of the night and took my son from my side while I your servant was asleep. She put him by her breast and put her dead son by my breast. The next morning, I got up to nurse my son—and he was dead! But when I looked at him closely in the morning light, I saw that it wasn’t the son I had borne.”

The other woman said, “No! The living one is my son; the dead one is yours.”

But the first one insisted, “No! The dead one is yours; the living one is mine.” And so they argued before the king.

The king said, “This one says, ‘My son is alive and your son is dead,’ while that one says, ‘No! Your son is dead and mine is alive.’”

Then the king said, “Bring me a sword.” So they brought a sword for the king. He then gave an order: “Cut the living child in two and give half to one and half to the other.”

The woman whose son was alive was deeply moved out of love for her son and said to the king, “Please, my lord, give her the living baby! Don’t kill him!”

But the other said, “Neither I nor you shall have him. Cut him in two!”

Then the king gave his ruling: “Give the living baby to the first woman. Do not kill him; she is his mother.”

When all Israel heard the verdict the king had given, they held the king in awe, because they saw that he had wisdom from God to administer justice.

1 Kings 3

There are those times and circumstances in which we are in a quandary to know what to do, maybe what to say and not say. Special times during which we need wisdom. The James passage quoted above is about facing trials, while the passage on Solomon’s ruling over the two women’s dispute comes in the narrative right after Solomon’s prayer for wisdom. We can be sure, James tells us, that God will give us wisdom when we ask, God being generous and not fault-finding. Solomon received that wisdom in spades, coming from his sincere request with the great responsibility that he faced as king of Israel. Ultimately sadly he failed, though just maybe the book of Ecclesiastes lends us in part some of a new wisdom discovered after his failure.

We have to keep looking to God for wisdom, and we must be determined to carry it out, to live what we learn. But we can be sure that if we ask and wait, God will give us the wisdom we need. In and through Jesus.

God keeps on giving

God, whose very nature is to give to everyone without a second thought, without keeping score

James 1:5 (CEB)

Jesus tells us that if we’re to be children of the Father, then we will give even to those who would hurt us, since the Father gives sunshine and rain to everyone, to the evil and the good (Matthew 5:43-48). God is very much a giving God.

And so we consider a bit the words of James directed at the faithful, believing ones, to encourage us in our trials and weakness. God’s giving to us knows no end. The problem comes when we project something of our own limitations and even sin onto God. Or for whatever reason we fail to believe this. And of course, it’s not enough to believe something as in kind of an intelletual, even creedal belief, though that might be a good start. We need to live as if this is the case.

Which means that whatever we are facing, and for whatever reason, we can return to God again and again, asking God for wisdom to help us through the trial both for the good of others and our own good, as well as to his glory. God gives to help us carry on well in God’s will, in the way of the Lord. Blessing us to bless us, but also so that we might be a blessing to others. That is the very nature of God. The problem is us, that we don’t receive it for whatever reason. Even though at the same time, all humankind receives one blessing after another which ultimately can be traced back to the hand of God.

And so we in Jesus are to live in this confidence, knowing we have a most generous Father, whose generosity knows no bounds.