difficult changes

Sometimes different plans and policies are put in place which are difficult one way or another. Change is hard. We may be so used to a certain pattern or way of doing things over the years, that all the sudden to have to drop some key element for whatever reason, even when the change had little or no direct bearing on what that was, is a challenge. Both in terms of actually doing it, and most especially in our attitude concerning it.

That’s when we should look for the silver lining, for whatever good might come out of it, some of that probably unforeseen by us. Not being in a gloom and doom mode, but rather, being upbeat about it. Even if that’s only because we’re committing it to the Lord. Sometimes God has a way of breaking in, which makes little or no sense at the time, but might be more understandable later. Or maybe not.

Just the same, we need to accept everything as from God, since nothing happens in life apart from God’s sovereign hand, either directing the change, or permitting it. We should be looking for the good that can come out of it, instead of dwelling on what we’re missing or have lost because of the change.

Of course I’m not referring to any call for change which contradicts God’s known will for us as given to us in scripture and from the gospel. Then we should make our appeal, be patient in prayer, and if turned down, seek for the discernment needed to know what to do, and what not to do. And never compromise our faith in the process.

Admittedly difficult, but all part of the call to faith that we have in Jesus.

Advertisements

getting through a difficult time

Sustain me, my God, according to your promise, and I will live;
    do not let my hopes be dashed.
Uphold me, and I will be delivered;
    I will always have regard for your decrees.

Psalm 119:116-117

There is no doubt that there are periods of time which can be trying for a number of reasons. I like the way scripture throughout, as well as in specific places leaves room for all of us to be able to identify in some way with what is written.

The psalmist is living according to God’s promise, so that their hope is both set and based on God’s word. And specifically God’s promise, perhaps meaning here the promise of being helped and being the Psalmist’s Help. We might liken the psalmist’s hope to having a dream of what might be. Both for the psalmist and for myself, it’s likely more in terms of a hope with an outcome not envisioned. At least for myself. Though I do have specific prayer requests along the way.

I must return again and again to God’s word, to scripture, to be both braced for what I need to be aware of and for living, and to be buoyed up so as to begin to think and live that way. And part of that process is going through difficulties, even hard times. Trials for the trying, testing, and refining of faith is a major theme in scripture.

And of course it’s in the way of the Lord, in devotion to God and God’s will. We live for God’s good purpose in Jesus and find fulfillment in that. And remember, “This too shall pass.” Better times are coming. Especially in the life to come. In and through Jesus.

every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill made low

“Every valley shall be raised up,
    every mountain and hill made low;
the rough ground shall become level,
    the rugged places a plain.
And the glory of the Lord will be revealed,
    and all people will see it together.
For the mouth of the Lord has spoken.”

Isaiah 40:4-5

This time of the year (along with Easter and other times) I listen to one of my favorite musical pieces, Handel’s Messiah. Two pieces which point to God’s fulfillment of Advent are Every valley shall be exalted and And the glory of the Lord.

Someday God’s kingdom will be entirely present, and God’s will done on earth as it is in heaven. Something we’re to pray for now in the present age, but which will be completely fulfilled when heaven and earth become one at our Lord’s return in the new creation.

Meanwhile part of our passion and message is to proclaim this salvation to the world, and to be a people who show the world what this salvation looks like both in how we are as the church and how we extend that to the world.

Of course we would like governments in place which will be advocates and helpers of the poor, oppressed and helpless. And we should pray for and encourage such policies. But until our Lord returns, we the church, the people in King Jesus are to demonstrate to the world what this kingdom is like, how it is different in and through King Jesus.

And the Bible makes it clear that at the heart of this good news of the Messiah is a righteousness which is just, a justice which is righteous. And that this good news, this gospel brings with it a passion for those in need which proves itself in good works. And does not ignore corruption in high places, especially at the expense of others.

Every valley shall be exalted, and mountain and hill made low. And the glory of the Lord will be revealed. And all humankind will see it together. That is in the heartbeat of God and God’s people in and through Jesus.

 

the our Father/Lord’s prayer in thinking about the gospel and life today

“This, then, is how you should pray:

“‘Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
    on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
    as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,[a]
    but deliver us from the evil one.[b]

Matthew 6:9-13

How do we look at what the good news (which is what gospel means) in Christ, and all of life? Oftentimes we evangelicals are criticized for being navel gazers so to speak, the idea of it being all about my salvation and walk with God and management of life. And when it comes to the world at large, we are also criticized for not seeing community as more important than the individual, without bypassing any individual. I think much of the criticism is probably justified to some extent. Not that other groups don’t have their blinders on. And not that the evangelicals don’t have some strengths, because I believe we do.

But regardless of what Christian tradition we’re a part of, the Our Father/Lord’s prayer can help us get a view in keeping with the Biblical view of God’s will for us and for the world. And what is to be basic for us. It is a prayer worth repeating every Sunday as a church (the evangelical mega church where we’ve been taking our grandchildren, and probably will join does not), and every day of our lives, or at least regularly. Of course it has to be read in light of all the rest of scripture. But it is basic and formative in helping us understand what our view of the impact of the gospel and the world should be. All of this in and through Jesus.

accepting one’s lot

This is what I have observed to be good: that it is appropriate for a person to eat, to drink and to find satisfaction in their toilsome labor under the sun during the few days of life God has given them—for this is their lot. Moreover, when God gives someone wealth and possessions, and the ability to enjoy them, to accept their lot and be happy in their toil—this is a gift of God. They seldom reflect on the days of their life, because God keeps them occupied with gladness of heart.

Ecclesiastes 5:18-20

It probably has taken me quite a while, but I think I’ve finally come around to begin to completely accept my lot in life with all the challenges and disappointments that come along my way. Life is like that; it is not some kind of dream vacation. Rather it is the hum-drum of challenge, effort, setback, failure at times, more effort, repentance all along the way, and remaining at it day after day.

And then there’s all the good that comes, if we could just see it. Wrapped up in the gifts God gives us, like the good wife I have, the grandchildren, the good I see in our daughter, the provisions God gives us to live and enjoy life.

Yes, in my case I would have liked to have been a pastor or teacher, but it didn’t pan out for this reason or that. I still maybe have some faint glimmers of dreaming about what I would like to see in whatever more days God allots to me. But above all, I want to more and more not only accept, but embrace whatever God gives me, and whatever place I find myself in. Knowing that God is good and that he will provide and help us as we seek to help others and be a blessing. In and through Jesus.

the habit of prayer

Devote yourselves to prayer, being watchful and thankful.

Colossians 4:2

Going together with yesterday’s post on the word is this post on prayer. Both are central to our life and walk in Christ. We remember in Acts that the apostles set apart men to do special work in the church that needed to be done, so that they could give themselves to prayer and the word of God. In that case they were referring primarily to preaching, or proclaiming, as well as teaching that word. And yes, if we’re in the word we at least are witnesses to that through its impact on our lives. Of course I’m not talking about something apart from God. We’re talking about no less than God’s word itself.

Prayer is both our response to that word, and our anticipation of it. It would be best if we were in prayer all the time.

Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.

1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

A big part of prayer is silence in waiting before God. And in the midst of that, perhaps contemplating something of God’s glory and will, or whatever it is that God wants to get through to us in that silence. It’s amazing how silence can speak. In the tradition of the church, this has been called contemplative prayer. And I think scripture supports that.

God wants to hear our prayers. While we shouldn’t pray just for prayer’s sake, and fill the air with nonstop words (figurative of course, since most of our praying will likely be under our lips or in our minds), we need to have both preemptive, as well as reactionary prayer, as in words to God. It is a practice we may not at all feel like doing, and we may feel dead doing it at times, but we need to press on and simply do it. And keep doing it. So that it becomes a pattern of life by which we live. Even as we remain in the word along with others in and through Jesus.

learning to live with disappointment, finding God in the picture

It is interesting again and again how life doesn’t end up the way we had half way anticipated or hoped, or were even led to believe. We might think that God has disappeared, and is not in the picture. And it can seem that what we have left is okay, yet still disappointing, or even at times not desirable at all.

What we need to look for in faith is how God might be directing and working. Faith does not exclude an imaginative, certainly prayerful look into what is and what might be. Not diminishing what is missing, but looking at what remains, and the possibilities in that.

Above all, it is a case of learning to rest in God’s promises and will in Jesus. Believing not only in God’s goodness, but his purposes at work in everything, for the gospel. We have to hang on and look, pray and keep looking. And learn to acclimate ourselves to change, and unexpected outcomes.

God’s will will prevail. The question becomes just how much of that working of God we will be a part of. Of course it’s all by grace, nothing more nor less. We need to rest in that, ready to do our part when the time and opportunity comes. As God’s purposes in Jesus continue on through the gospel. In and through Jesus.