stay in the lines

When I do a post, sometimes I want to make a particular point on an opinion, maybe even close to a conviction of mine. But then I remember what this blog and what Christian ministry is all about. It’s not about what we think, but about God’s word. Yes, God’s word interpreted, and in consideration of how the Spirit has guided the church in that interpretation, maybe we can say, loosely speaking. And then I draw back, going to what the word, Scripture specifically says.

Opinions are fine for talking, conversational points, but not good for Christian teaching.

There are issues of interpretation, called biblical hermeneutics. And that can open up controversy, no doubt. Maybe there’s a place for that in considering different ways a text might be understood, with perhaps more than one point being made in a text. That’s part of the genius and depth of Scripture. At the same time, we do well to seek to stay in the lines of what Scripture is saying, noting possible differences in understanding that, but nevertheless seeking to stay true to what Scripture calls itself: God’s (written) word.

I think sometimes Scripture is a bit fuzzy on purpose, and that we’re not meant to unravel it all. At the same time we ought to pay attention to both sound interpretation along with how the church has generally interpreted a passage, trusting that the Spirit keeps the church true to the main intent of Scripture, the gospel, and in doing so, helps the church on the details. There is a need for reformation in understanding at times, because humans and institutions within the church can get off track.

The main point here is to seek to adhere to what Scripture says, what God might be saying through it, along with what God indeed is saying. And remain in dialog with that, with the goal of remaining true in both faith and practice. In and through Jesus.

remain in the word

Your word is a lamp for my feet,
a light on my path.
I have taken an oath and confirmed it,
that I will follow your righteous laws.
I have suffered much;
preserve my life, Lord, according to your word.
Accept, Lord, the willing praise of my mouth,
and teach me your laws.
Though I constantly take my life in my hands,
I will not forget your law.
The wicked have set a snare for me,
but I have not strayed from your precepts.
Your statutes are my heritage forever;
they are the joy of my heart.
My heart is set on keeping your decrees
to the very end.

Psalm 119:105-112

I am one of those Bible Christians. We “Bible Christians” get plenty of bad raps nowadays from people who want to point out deficiencies in our theology. I’m sure there’s plenty of that to go around for everyone. It’s not like we shouldn’t listen to the criticisms or critiques of others. But the main point I would like to make here is that we need to remain in the word: God’s written word, Scripture, the Bible. And to keep doing so day after day after day. With the intent of faith, trust, and obedience. All else is secondary to that. In and through Jesus.

 

preach the word

In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction.

2 Timothy 4:1-2

I’m not sure what I’m hearing from some alleged Christian ministers, but I’m thankful for the many who attempt to do what is called for in this great passage. I personally don’t want to hear something new, unheard of by anyone before. What I want to hear is the word preached, God’s inscripturated word, Scripture, what we call the Bible, the heart of that being the gospel, the good news fulfilled in Jesus.

We don’t need anything fancy. Just the faithful preaching and teaching of God’s word which has a depth and beauty all its own, and leads us to God’s Word: Jesus. Nothing more and nothing less. In and through Jesus.

by faith comes God’s miracle Promise

In the sixth month of Elizabeth’s pregnancy, God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee, to a virgin pledged to be married to a man named Joseph, a descendant of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. The angel went to her and said, “Greetings, you who are highly favored! The Lord is with you.”

Mary was greatly troubled at his words and wondered what kind of greeting this might be. But the angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary; you have found favor with God. You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over Jacob’s descendants forever; his kingdom will never end.”

“How will this be,” Mary asked the angel, “since I am a virgin?”

The angel answered, “The Holy Spirit will come on you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. So the holy one to be born will be called the Son of God. Even Elizabeth your relative is going to have a child in her old age, and she who was said to be unable to conceive is in her sixth month. For no word from God will ever fail.”

“I am the Lord’s servant,” Mary answered. “May your word to me be fulfilled.” Then the angel left her.

Luke 1:26-38

We who follow Christ live by faith in God’s word. That is the heart of Mary’s response to the amazing word the angel/messenger gave to her. Along with a servant’s attitude, that God’s will be done.

It’s interesting that the gospel in the person of Christ came into the world through the faith of this young woman. Yes, God could have done it any way God would have chosen, but he chooses by and large to work through our faith in him, in his word. Our trust is not at all in ourselves, or even in our faith, but in God and God’s promises. That is where our faith rests. And by which we see God’s miracle come. In and through Jesus.

 

the rugged realism of the Bible

One of the reasons I turn to the pages of the Bible again and again is the fact that it portrays life not in nice fairy tale like stories, but in the hard grit and brokenness of real life. I think too that’s a sign of its divine inspiration as God’s written word, of course pointing us to God’s Word in Jesus. We are met where we’re at with all our need. To point us in the true direction needed, toward God, away from our sins in and through Jesus.

soaking in the word

We were once part of a Christian fellowship in which there were times when some people would practice “soaking in the Spirit.” It was what today is called “charismatic” and I believe God was moving and helping people during such times.

What I myself try to practice on a daily basis is more like what I would call soaking in the word, God’s written word of Scripture. In that word we find light and life, and ultimately the Word himself, Jesus.

There are plenty of ups and downs in life. Disappointments along the way, along with difficulties. But we can get our bearings and much more if we stay in God’s word day and night. That is frankly a challenge, a discipline that as disciples of Christ we need to undergo. But the alternative is worse, left to ourselves and our own thinking and devices. Instead we need to be “thinking God’s thoughts after him.”

We must beware of the idea that as we’re doing so we’ve arrived, or something of the sort. The word itself will help us from that foolishness, having plenty that will challenge us and help us see that we need God’s direction anew and afresh in our lives.

All of this given to us in and through Jesus.

a kind of summation of Psalm 119

ת Taw

May my cry come before you, Lord;
give me understanding according to your word.
May my supplication come before you;
deliver me according to your promise.
May my lips overflow with praise,
for you teach me your decrees.
May my tongue sing of your word,
for all your commands are righteous.
May your hand be ready to help me,
for I have chosen your precepts.
I long for your salvation, Lord,
and your law gives me delight.
Let me live that I may praise you,
and may your laws sustain me.
I have strayed like a lost sheep.
Seek your servant,
for I have not forgotten your commands.

Psalm 119:169-176

One can see the last part of Psalm 119 as a kind of summation of this great psalm. There is a mix of faith, hope and love; a dependence on God in looking to God to do what only God can do. But an expectation along with that, that God surely will. And with that, an anticipation of what will come as a result: God’s goodness, and the response of praise to God for such. This is always the tension at play in our lives in God.

The end is appropriate. There is a sense of lostness, the psalmist’s fault and yet almost an inevitable part of our lives in this life now. We do stray along the way, but our response should be the same as the psalmist: a cry to God to find us, to come near to us, since in our heart we want to obey God’s commands. In and through Jesus.