getting over worry(?)

Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done. Then you will experience God’s peace, which exceeds anything we can understand. His peace will guard your hearts and minds as you live in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7; NLT

Years, even decades ago I called in to a radio program on a local Christian station to talk to a wise man, Herb Vander Lugt. I was frustrated over my lifelong problem of worry. I asked him something like what if I just made the commitment not to worry, period. Would that work? With whatever else I had in mind, maybe just a firm resolution that direction. As I recall he chuckled, and then gave his wise mature pastoral advice from Scripture. Not sure what my response was. Except that I really didn’t learn to apply Scripture well in the way he said. Sure, there were times when I applied the above passage and experienced God’s answer, probably a fairly good number of times. But too often, sadly more than not, I would get hung up really badly on some point, and when that was over it wouldn’t be long until my next anxiety bout hit. This didn’t really amount to panic attacks, nor anything I couldn’t live with. But it did put me under a cloud of gloom, or contributed to that, where I lived far too much of the time.

Fast forward to now. I think I manage my worry issue better than I used to, seeking to apply Scripture, and trusting, no matter what my experience. But lately it’s amped up again. And unfortunately having been conditioned so long in this, it’s like the bottom drops out so that almost as soon as the next worry hits, I can be sure to experience a huge down drag. 

Today I was working on some house project, and realizing that a nagging worry about this and that was taking hold. The thought came, yes, I basically worry about everything. What if instead I refused to worry about anything? Of course resolutions won’t help, that is if it’s just self-effort. But resolve is not altogether bad, certainly not wrong in itself. It is good to say no, I won’t worry about anything, but rather pray about everything because of what we’re told in the above Scripture.

We need to think of all of Scripture, and of life itself. Worry and anxiety are something of an act, but a condition as well. Some of us all too easily are anxious about this and that, often overcome by worry. Googling can help, but it can also hinder. The more you know, the more you wonder. And can remain uncertain about so many things.

It would help us if we would simply realize that bad things do happen in this world. And that even with our best efforts, we just don’t know it all. And this life is certain to be full of problems. But at the same time, remembering God and God’s promises, that God has it, God knows and is able, and we’re at best limited and dependent.

We ought to do the best we can especially in concern for others, as well as taking care of responsibilities. We should keep working at that, knowing it will never end. And that even our best efforts may not prevent what we want to avoid. 

I think it is important to practice what Paul tells us above. Then regardless of what happens, God’s peace will see us through, guarding our hearts and minds. Better than getting what we want, and in view of the reality that often won’t happen anyhow.

the danger of relying on feelings

Above all else, guard your heart,
for everything you do flows from it.

Proverbs 4:24

The Hebrew word translated “heart” here refers to both thinking and feelings, to the entire inner person. We’re told here to guard it above all else. This seems to me to suggest a discipline that refuses to let up. I notice two extremes in my life which I would like to avoid. One is when all seems well and from that I can go off on this or that, getting carried away in ways which aren’t well enough controlled. The other extreme is probably more what I’ve been accustomed to: being dead or overcome with negative feelings, then choosing to ignore them and rely on rational thought with the danger of running roughshod over anything and everything. The self-control that comes from the Holy Spirit can help us navigate and find good throughout all the fluctuations of our inner life.

To much of the world, “if it feels good, do it.” You do whatever comes naturally, whatever that is. That really doesn’t work well unfortunately, because we’re amiss or at least easily led astray even by what in itself is alright and good. This passage suggests that we’re to discipline ourselves in watching over our thoughts and emotions. What we do comes from what we are inside. God’s Spirit helps us both in our thoughts and feelings. It’s not at all like they’re unimportant. And we’re involved in the process. We aren’t just carried around as automatons, but we are completely involved in this walk of life. And part of that is to guard ourselves inwardly so that outwardly we might live lives pleasing to God for the good of others. In and through Jesus.