turning to God’s word because I must

ז Zayin

Remember your word to your servant,
for you have given me hope.
My comfort in my suffering is this:
Your promise preserves my life.
The arrogant mock me unmercifully,
but I do not turn from your law.
I remember, Lord, your ancient laws,
and I find comfort in them.
Indignation grips me because of the wicked,
who have forsaken your law.
Your decrees are the theme of my song
wherever I lodge.
In the night, Lord, I remember your name,
that I may keep your law.
This has been my practice:
I obey your precepts.

Psalm 119:49-56

What do I turn to, especially when I’m struggling? Again and again, the Bible, God’s written word. My dependence on God is expressed in seeking God’s will in the word.

There are precious promise books, and that can be helpful. I do turn again and again to Philippians 4:6-7 in my mind, and other passages, as well. But it’s important to go through the entire Bible. I especially mediate through the New Testament on a regular basis, but read through the entire Bible, as well. We need it all. Any reader of the New Testament should note what is says both directly and indirectly about the importance of the Old Testament. So we need it all. And often we need the parts we might least suspect we need.

And so we’re to keep going back to God’s word again and again throughout our days. Knowing that word can change us, as we’re intent to listen and follow through on what God is telling us. In and through Jesus.

God backs God’s word

ה He

Teach me, Lord, the way of your decrees,
that I may follow it to the end.[a]
Give me understanding, so that I may keep your law
and obey it with all my heart.
Direct me in the path of your commands,
for there I find delight.
Turn my heart toward your statutes
and not toward selfish gain.
Turn my eyes away from worthless things;
preserve my life according to your word.[b]
Fulfill your promise to your servant,
so that you may be feared.
Take away the disgrace I dread,
for your laws are good.
How I long for your precepts!
In your righteousness preserve my life.

Psalm 119:33-40

Scripture is considered in every Christian tradition God’s word written. Unless you’re referring to those traditions that don’t have a high regard for Scripture, and therefore, in my view, are less Christian if Christian at all. To be Christian is to hold to the gospel, the good news of Christ, found in Scripture.

God backs God’s word. All one has to do is commit themselves to being in God’s word, and letting that word, indeed we can say, letting God shape us. As has well been said: It’s not we who are to critique God’s word; God’s word is to critique us. God’s word will change us simply because it’s God’s word. Of course, we must listen, and then attempt to be in submission to that word, in obedience and faith. In so doing, we’ll find what is good, what we indeed find delight in.

There is absolutely no doubt that it all depends on God, as the psalmist here says. If we trust God, God will fulfill what he says, all of God’s promises to us. And those promises include God’s work in changing us to live according to his will. God’s witness to ourselves, to those around us, to the world. In and through Jesus.

hearing God’s voice above the noise

ג Gimel

Be good to your servant while I live,
that I may obey your word.
Open my eyes that I may see
wonderful things in your law.
I am a stranger on earth;
do not hide your commands from me.
My soul is consumed with longing
for your laws at all times.
You rebuke the arrogant, who are accursed,
those who stray from your commands.
Remove from me their scorn and contempt,
for I keep your statutes.
Though rulers sit together and slander me,
your servant will meditate on your decrees.
Your statutes are my delight;
they are my counselors.

Psalm 119:17-24

If there’s one thing true about living in this world, it’s that God’s word is not just given short shrift, it’s not considered at all. In fact, it’s considered at best, antiquated, and at worst unhelpful, even harmful.

That means we need to be in God’s word all the more. We cannot let up on that. That is where we find God’s directives, and learn to hear the voice of God above the clamor of all the other voices. In and through Jesus.

 

the rest the Lord gives

He makes me lie down in green pastures,
he leads me beside quiet waters,
he refreshes my soul.

Psalm 23:2-3a

It’s interesting that the Lord takes the initiative here. I’m reminded of Jesus’s words, “Come with me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest” (Mark 6:31b). I think the main meaning is what we might call soul rest, but surely there’s physical rest as well as spiritual rest (Psalm 127:2). Certainly Jesus’s words to his disciples were for their physical rest, as well as spiritual.

Quietness is also a part of the picture here. We’re off somewhere without all the noise of a busy world, even without what noise we like, music or whatever it might be. And we’re off some place where in the silence we can hear God’s voice (1 Kings 19:12). I like music playing most all the time, if I don’t have something else on. At least I like less volume than especially in my younger years, but silence, no. But even I find silence valuable because it seems to awaken in me more of a sensitivity to and appreciation for the Lord’s voice. It’s not like we can never hear God’s voice above all the noise. And music might actually help us that way (2 Kings 3:15-16, and note that the psalms are often set to music along with other passages in Scripture). But being silent and finding quiet can help us hear God’s voice, and is also restful in itself.

And the Lord refreshes our soul. That probably means something like renewing our strength (see NET Bible footnote and parallel versions). The Hebrew word translated “soul” in the NIV means “life” or an individual person or persons. Times of rest should be times of refreshment when our strength is renewed. A kind of restoration to face life again with anticipation, ready for the long haul or whatever awaits us is surely in the cards here. We can see from the rest of Psalm 23 that all of life is pictured. So that this blessing is meant to prepare us for such, as we continue under the leading and care of the good shepherd. In and through Jesus.

 

 

listen up

The LORD came and stood there, calling as at the other times, “Samuel! Samuel!”

Then Samuel said, “Speak, for your servant is listening.”

And the LORD said to Samuel: “See, I am about to do something in Israel that will make the ears of everyone who hears about it tingle.

1 Samuel 3:10-11

One of the essentials if we’re to truly be followers of the Lord is to develop a keen awareness of his voice. We need to listen and we need the discernment that comes from the Spirit of God to understand. In fact of course we need God to open our ears in the first place.

The boy Samuel needed the priest Eli’s help to set himself to listen for God’s voice, or in this case discern since Samuel had earlier heard the voice calling him. I think we best hear God’s voice in the midst of life as we remain in God’s word, Scripture. God speaks to us through the Book and directly.

Our regular hearing should improve dramatically when we take the attitude of a servant. We aspire as those who would be the Lord’s servant. Our goal is obedience to God. But even more basic is our desire to commune and thus to know and walk faithfully with God.

God’s grace is key in all of this. We may think God will no longer speak to us when we either mess up or have attitudes that are wrong or at least questionable. In reality I think it’s accurate to say the Lord is always speaking. But whether we’re keen to listen is the question. In and through Jesus.

simplify

As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”

“Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one.[a] Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”

Luke 10:38-42

As I get older I am wanting to and actually simplifying my life, not just making that attempt to do so, but gradually doing it, or at least so I think. That doesn’t mean one isn’t aware of and as necessary on top of so many responsibilities part and parcel of this life. That part never ends. How we approach all of that is another matter.

Mary in the story above had come to simply be devoted to hearing the Lord’s word, sitting at his feet and taking it all in. Martha was busy about, not actually having time to listen. Through this episode she ended up learning the lesson well, evident from the passage in John 11 on Lazarus’s death. She became open to the Lord’s word, but I’m sure continued to serve well, even if she pared down some of what she did.

Life itself doesn’t seem to get any simpler, maybe even more complicated as time goes on. We learn more and realize just how complex it all is, and how for so many problems in this world there are no easy pat answers. Except…

As followers of Christ we need to dial down as to how we approach all of this. “What is our calling?” is one good question we can ask. Our attitude and actions must follow. There are few things that matter, in essence only one. We must be immersed into our Lord’s teaching, into the Lord himself. Everything else can fall by the wayside in comparison with that because without that nothing else we do will matter. We won’t receive the blessing and be the blessing needed. What is needed given to us in and through Jesus.

“do you want to get well?”

Some time later, Jesus went up to Jerusalem for one of the Jewish festivals. Now there is in Jerusalem near the Sheep Gate a pool, which in Aramaic is called Bethesda and which is surrounded by five covered colonnades. Here a great number of disabled people used to lie—the blind, the lame, the paralyzed. One who was there had been an invalid for thirty-eight years. When Jesus saw him lying there and learned that he had been in this condition for a long time, he asked him, “Do you want to get well?”

“Sir,” the invalid replied, “I have no one to help me into the pool when the water is stirred. While I am trying to get in, someone else goes down ahead of me.”

Then Jesus said to him, “Get up! Pick up your mat and walk.” At once the man was cured; he picked up his mat and walked.

John 5:1-8

A man had been disabled for thirty-eight years, so that he couldn’t even move quickly enough to get himself into a pool when the waters stirred, probably close to it, but time and time again another making it in before him to be healed. You would think that Jesus’s question to him made little or no sense: “Do you want to get well?” That ought to be a no-brainer.

But a big part of faith beyond an understanding of need, and the desire to have that need met is the audacity to believe God can do it, and the willingness for whatever change accompanies that. When it comes to personal need, something that has been a part of us so long, like say, depression, or anxiety, or whatever, it is so much a part of us, and we’ve learned to cope maybe like the man in the story for so long, and we’ve nursed attitudes because of it, that it’s maybe hard to imagine anything else, perhaps even threatening. Faith accepts God’s question and invitation, and is willing for the breakthrough, what is otherwise impossible, at God’s call and healing word.

Interesting later that Jesus found the man he had healed and addressed him with these words:

“See, you are well again. Stop sinning or something worse may happen to you.”

John 5:14b

Jesus knows each and every heart, evidenced by his initial probing of the man before he healed him. He knows just what we need. We need to pay close attention and seek to adjust, in repentance and faith. God can and will help us in ways we can’t help ourselves, as we look to Jesus and seek to follow him. In and through Jesus.