the rest we need

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

There is no question that the world is either restless or in a rest that isn’t necessarily good or not good at all. The Bible speaks of this time and again, Ecclesiastes being one book starkly depicting it. We seem hardwired against entering into the one rest that brings the true flourishing which we may have once had an inkling of and longing for. We can take care of it ourselves, whatever we’re running after and restless for until we collapse before we go for it some more.

But Jesus invites us into a rest with him, away from the clamor and emptiness of the world’s headlong rush. Yet while apart from that very world, present in it. While there are regular times alone with God, and periodic get aways, this rest is largely lived in the midst and mess of every day normal life. That is what Jesus modeled for us as we see in the gospel accounts, and what the church is called to as we’re told in the rest of the New Testament.

The difference is that we are in and about the Lord’s work, in the way of the Lord no less. But one can well say prior to that in fellowship, indeed close communion with him. I have experienced that at times, though often my experience has been hard, dark and difficult. Which makes me long all the more to learn to enter, remain and live in this yoke of rest with our gentle, humble, living and loving Lord.

 

 

what it means to follow King Jesus in a political world

Unlike those in Bible times, we live in a democratic society, which complicates our reading and application of scripture. If you read nothing more, read this, which is an excellent application of scripture in light of that.

When it comes to the politics of this world, I think we in Jesus need to apply the politics of Jesus, and the politics of the kingdom, and while that will surely impact our position on any issue, for example the refugee issue, it’s not as simple as either lining up with one party or candidate, or opposing another party or candidate. And in the end, though it may well affect the way we vote (or not vote, and if we vote at all), it ends up being solely about one thing for us: living for Jesus and for the gospel.

I do pay some attention to the politics of this world, and especially so, since I live in a democracy in which I can participate directly and indirectly in the process. While I think Christians can become unduly entangled in a mess when it comes to politics, I also think there might be some good we can do, especially as advocates for the poor, oppressed, and helpless. And we may want policies which help our families, all well and good, but we need to beware of making it all about us, what we want, what is best for us.

To understand what it means to follow King Jesus, we surely need to practice what John R. W. Stott advocated in his book, Between Two Worlds. He lived before the digital revolution, so he wrote of having the Bible in one hand, and the newspaper in another. The problem in any age, but it seems particularly acute today, is the reality that the digital and news of the day can easily swallow up most all of our time, so that we end up being very little in the Bible at all. And after all, haven’t many of us read it through (or heard it read) at least a number of times?

But to follow King Jesus here and now, we need an interactive relationship both with scripture and with the world in which we live. But we must think of it, if we’re to follow King Jesus, not in terms of what the world wants, but what Jesus wants. And the root of that must be in the revelation we find in scripture of Jesus, and the good news in him. And we live that out from and within our communion as the church.

We must beware of getting caught up and entangled in either the Christian right or left, or the political right or left. Instead, we’re to follow Jesus. And in that communion, that fellowship, we are united to those who may see differently when it comes to the politics of this world, but with whom we’re united in the common goal of following Jesus, and obeying him, as well as living from and witnessing to the gospel, the good news in him.

That must be our goal, even our heart, and nothing less.