faith as allegiance

I am more than a little bit averse to easy constructs in theology to describe the whole of what is going on in scripture in the story of God. But I ran across a post, worth the read, which I think provides a good summary of one important aspect of faith, from a scholar, Matthew Bates. I wish he would describe things more in a way which puts the cookies on the lower shelf. If you read him, you may have to use a dictionary and work at thinking through what he is saying, which really is not a bad exercise in itself. Here are three points Scot McKnight draws out of Bates’s thoughts about what faith is:

  1. Mental affirmation/intellectual agreement: certain enough to yield.
  2. Professed fealty to Jesus as Lord (Rom 10:9-10).
  3. Enacted loyalty to the king, as in the obedience of faith.

I do think this point made of scripture making faith to be at its very basic, allegiance, does reflect what scripture actually teaches when one considers faith in the context of Jesus, and again, the post admirably sets that forth. I also want to see faith as somehow basically family-oriented, in that we are children of God through faith in Jesus, and that the faith of a little child is required, if one is to enter into the kingdom of God. So yes, allegiance to King Jesus the Messiah, as Lord, but also faith within the context of family, as God’s children. Of course we need scripture to fill out all the parameters of what allegiance to Jesus and living as God’s children in God’s household means.

Faith as allegiance to Jesus as Lord, and trust in God as Father is important in becoming our orientation in the rough and tumble of everyday living. We do things not out of some personal, self-centered goal, nor thinking that it ultimately depends on us. Instead we do everything out of loyalty to Christ, trusting in the Father to bring good out of everything, and to meet all of our needs together with others. All of this in and through Jesus.

Presidents, politics, even nations (empires) come and go. Jesus is Lord.

Scot McKnight has an interesting piece on what the world needs most, precisely, What America’s Culture Wars Need Most, and I agree. Looking at what’s best for the United States, it would surely be a people whose expectations for the United States, or for any government or political entity or leader are tempered by their belief in one transcendent that deserves full allegiance and trust: King Jesus, and God’s grace and kingdom come in him.

This thought may not be easy for anyone, so great is the divide in the United States today. And it’s not like the politics of the nation state doesn’t matter, nor carry with it serious consequences. But it is a question of just where our ultimate confidence lies, and if we even unwittingly place that kind of trust in a political party or ideology of this earth, rather than in God. It is one thing to think this way or that about whatever issue we’re considering. It’s quite another to assume that the answer for the world lies in lining up one certain way or another. How such matters turn out may indeed make a world of difference, but what difference, or we might say kind of difference are we as followers of Jesus, as the church to make through the gospel?

The gospel, the good news in Jesus, is in some ways oblivious to the world and its ways. It matters not who’s in charge in Washington or elsewhere, the church through the gospel continues on with the same humanity coming out of the same life regardless. The church stands as the witness to the one good news which remains constant, and ought to be a light which often brings a rebuke to the nation state.

We must beware of putting our confidence not only in elected officials, but in ourselves as well, thinking that through grass roots effort, we can effect the change needed for the world. Again, it’s not like such things never matter. It’s just that there’s one thing which will stick and effect a change which will go beyond whatever changes occur within the world system. The good news of God’s grace and kingdom come in King Jesus by the Spirit experienced and lived out within the church, and to which the church is a witness is the one reality that will last.

We hope and pray for the good of the United States, and for the good of all nations. But our full confidence is in God’s promise in Jesus, no less. And never in any nation state.

a gospel bigger than I, me, mine, and even us- the only gospel there is

When we open our Bibles, the beginnning is Genesis, for a reason, and the end is the Revelation for a reason, and everything in between counts, every book and for that matter, every line, has its reason and place in the whole.

It is daunting, and takes commitment over time, but we all need to be in the entire Bible, as challenging on many levels as that is, and read it through again and again. When we do, we’ll come to see that the story of Israel picked by God to be a blessing to the world is a central theme. And how that is fulfilled through them, but mainly in anticipation of the true fulfillment in Jesus.

While this is certainly for each person in our relationship to God, it is for every other person, as well, and for the entire world. It’s a good news in and through Jesus which affects everything and is therefore worldly in that sense, or one could say earthly. But in another sense it can’t be worldly at all since it can’t participate, except insofar as it influences the change of worldy structures. This is the case, because the difference is in and through Jesus, and God’s redemption, salvation, and kingdom come in him.

Only when Jesus returns will all things be changed, the god of this age gone; the world, the flesh and the devil being a thing of the past. But until then, we witness not only to a gospel for each individual, but a gospel which is to begin to demonstrate the alternative to what is necessarily in place, in this present evil age and world.

And so we live in the in between times when God’s grace and kingdom in Jesus is beginning to break in through the gospel into the church, and out from that into the world. As we look forward to the end of this age which will bring in the fullness of what has begun now in Jesus, when he returns.

political posts

If someone really knew me in regard to US politics, they would find out I’m a hard one to pin down in any established category, which is why I happen to be a registered Independent voter. I am open to arguments on every side on most any issue. Often I don’t see things in such stark terms as right and wrong, although I will push back hard against American ideals, which while good in their place, out of place can be opposed to God’s kingdom ideals, perhaps the prime example, individual liberty canceling out loving one’s neighbor as one’s self. That’s not to say that these American privileges aren’t important, and to be treasured and preserved, such as freedom to worship (or not) as one chooses, but only to say that there might be times when we ought to make sacrifices for the good of others, particularly for the poor and needy among us without opening up a welfare state. Not easy, and hence just one example of the need for good governing. Of course I realize that even that statement ends up being political, and gets pegged somewhere.

On my blog, and really on Facebook, though by appearances at least, I may not do so well there, I try to avoid partisan politics of this world completely. Good people are on every side, and have often thought out well the hot issues such as abortion and the environment. Whether I agree with a politician on an issue, or not, I prefer to stay focused on the issue, rather than take sides with the politicians at all. In the recent presidential election, though I certainly was grading the politicians in my head, there was only one of them I wanted to vote for, and that candidate was not of a party people would probably think I would naturally gravitate to.

All of that to say what I think is most important in this post. To get to my point: I believe we in Jesus need to be known as political in one way only: we are committed to the politics of Jesus. Yes, the gospel is political because it encompasses all of life, not only my personal relationship with God through Christ, but everything else as well. How that works out in community can be played out in one place only, in the church together as the people of God in Jesus by the Spirit. We begin to live out now what will be completely true in the kingdom come, when our Lord, King Jesus returns. With the difference being that now we have to take up our crosses and follow, as well as live with an emphasis on helping the poor.

So we need to both respect differences and hold with an open hand, ready to let go, the politics of this world. If one of the believers serves in public office, they may have to be affiliated with one party or another, but their focus should be on issues, not on partisan politics. How much more so ought that to be the case for us who are witnesses to the one good news of the world, the gospel of our Lord Jesus.

 

what in the world is God doing?

I was listening on an interview on NPR to someone quite experienced and knowledgeable, who, in his opinion sees the positions so far of the new President of the United States, as well as what preceded him, as an indication that the world order, which in his view has promoted stability since the end of World War II through the Cold War, is changing, and not for the better. I am not sure what to make of all of this. My opinions and inclinations really don’t matter. I would think there has been both plenty of good and plenty not so good in what the United States has done the past fifty plus years. I could see the US as an empire, not an evil one, but still an empire. It certainly has been the number one world power since the end of the Cold War. Like in the real world, there is much good and evil mixed together. And to give oneself fully to any nation or leader of this world without reservation surely amounts to idolatry.

What if God is doing something in the world which might just shake up the nations a bit? Much has happened in my lifetime, the unimaginable, big and small. When we read scripture, we find that God is the Sovereign over all the nations, somehow at work in ways inscrutable and beyond us. We see a shaking and sifting going on quite often, but wish to see much more, like in the case of what appears to be purely evil regimes who abuse and murder. We long for the end of all the injustice in the world, looking forward to the promise of Jesus’s return when at last the long awaited good judgment will come, and the nations will be put in their place under the King of kings, and Lord of lords.

In the meantime, our focus as those in Jesus needs to be on our calling as the church through the gospel. Somehow a significant part of God’s work is through the church, Christ head over everything for it, through the gospel (Ephesians 1). We need to be invested in is in that. That is our calling in Jesus. As hard as this may be to accept, what else happens is beside the point. While at the same time, all Christians, wherever they live, wish for the good of their nation and people, as well as the good of all other nations.

May the Lord help us to grow in our trust in God, away from our idolatrous trust in other things. As we pray for all, and await the Day of our Lord’s return.

 

avoiding our own agendas

“This…is how you should pray:

“‘Our Father in heaven,
hallowed be your name,
your kingdom come,
your will be done,
    on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us today our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts,
    as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And lead us not into temptation,
    but deliver us from the evil one.’

Matthew 6

The prayer the Lord taught us ought to guide us not only in our praying, but also in what agendas we take up and promote in this world. As well as what we see as important in this world, from what is not as important, and might even be idolatrous, or maybe a waste of time.

And above all, we in Jesus need to be people of prayer. If we are praying about something, then we are at best, entering into a stance of interactivity with God, which means that more often than not, we will be involved in some way in God’s answer. At least we’re to be open to that.

And we do all of this with God’s agenda of the gospel in Jesus in heart, mind, and deed. The good news is of God’s grace, as well as kingdom in Jesus, and so is political, but not of the politics of this world. It might impact this world’s political systems, but it remains separate from them.

What is shocking to me is the notion that politics and the gospel have nothing in common. The good news in Jesus involves one’s salvation and personal relationship with God, yes. But that gospel is as big as all of life, with a promise which involves everything, and in the end, forever.

But concerning the politics of this world, we do well to have the attitude that regardless of how we vote and our own tendencies in regard to that, that God’s answer to it is as we find in Joshua, “Neither. But as Captain of the LORD of hosts, I have come to you.” In other words, we hope for the best for our nation and the world. But we are first and foremost, and in a certain sense exclusively on the Lord’s side. On King Jesus’s side. As we continue to pray, and begin to live out the prayer he taught us.

trying to understand different perspectives

Among the greatest needs in the United States on a social, as well as spiritual level is the importance of listening to others, to differing points of view. Politics, and issues which are put into that category is especially volatile, and the real war from all appearance seems to be waged on that front. Some moral issues which have other factors are part of that, along with the need for all sides to have their say. But it seems we’re nearing a tipping point, where there will be no compromise.

There is surely much to say about all of that, but that’s not my concern in this post. My point is simple: the need to learn to listen well to different perpsectives, with no agenda to correct or impose one’s own point of view. And in that process to better understand not only where they’re coming from, but what merits there possibly are, what truth actually lies there. So that we’re open to their perspective actually impacting our own.

In our culture today, such an attitude would seem rare at best. Part of that comes from what appears to be a largely nonnegotiable stance right from the top, meaning from the president, even though his administration appears to be more flexible. There needs to be a mature group which learns to listen well for the sake of the United States, yet which, even in the midst of differences: liberal or progressive, conservative, and whatever else, will hold feet to the fire with reference to the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights, the Amendments of the Constitution.

While that is important, there is something more important still, a matter which can be addressed only by the church and believers: the gospel, the good news in Jesus, and all the good of that out of God’s love for the world. We believers who live here in the United States and likely citizens of this nation do well to be concerned for the preservation of what is good in the ideals of this nation. But our most basic calling is to live lives completely devoted to Jesus and the gospel. In doing so, one of the first fundamental things we need to do is listen, listen, and listen some more, and say nothing (yet), at least be slow to speak, and simply love. And when we speak, talk about Jesus.

The goal is to win others to Jesus, and help them grow in their faith. Out of that hopefully will come real benefits for the United States, or any other nation in which the church is, but the outcome is in terms of God’s kingdom. As hard a statement as this is, I think it needs to be said: What God is doing with the nations, including the United States is rather beside the point. This is probably especially hard for us, since we’re a democracy, and either legitimately or not, we often have much invested in this nation. But our lives are to be lost for the sake of Jesus and the gospel (Mark 8). Christ is building his church, not nation states. And actually ruling the nations in some way through the church (Ephesians 1).

All of that more difficult stuff aside: We need to simply listen well, and be known as those who listen and love, even as we as witnesses hold firmly to God’s word in Jesus and in the gospel. Together in and through Jesus.