a thought for 2019: simplifying life

As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”

“Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one. Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”

Luke 10:38-42

There is no question that life is full of responsibilities. And it becomes worse if we buy into all our society insists is necessary. Like things people supposedly need. So that our infrastructure is built on that, big houses, etc. And on top of that the US economy is built on consumer debt. So that people put themselves in a bind from which they cannot easily escape. Thankfully, especially when people are younger they can begin new practices to get out of debt, and then avoid it or at least minimize it. And make better decisions financially, not driven by expectations of others.

What we do and refuse to do can help, but no matter what, we will be faced with difficulties and necessities we will have to deal with. One basic: Paul tells us that if someone does not provide for their own, they have denied the faith and are worse than an unbeliever (1 Timothy 5:8). There are indeed certain basic responsibilities we all have.

The problem Martha had, and all too many of us along with her is taking the weight of the world, her world on her shoulders. It’s hard to tell exactly what’s going on in the narrative. Martha maybe could have scaled down and prepared something simple enough so that she too could have at least listened to the Lord’s teaching, if not sitting at his feet like her sister Mary was. Interestingly enough, it’s Martha’s complaint which occasioned the Lord’s response. She felt a pressure that she need not have felt. And maybe that helps us toward the point the Lord in his response was making.

It would have been fine for Martha to continue serving as she was inclined and surely gifted to do and do well. That in itself was not wrong. The problem was the expectations she had accepted or placed on herself. Really beyond anything God would have or actually did expect as Jesus’s words make clear.

Our Lord tells Martha that she is worried and upset about many things. Then he says only a few things are needed, or only one. That Mary had chosen what is most essential, and that it wouldn’t be taken away from her.

I think for 2019 this may be telling at least many of us that we need to simplify. Perhaps scale down. Maybe let a good number of things go. And learn to cast all of our cares on God, who cares for us (1 Peter 5:7; Psalm 55:22). To quit being driven, and instead to learn to follow in step with the one whose invitation remains open:

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

 

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silence is golden

The angel said to him, “I am Gabriel. I stand in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to tell you this good news.And now you will be silent and not able to speak until the day this happens, because you did not believe my words, which will come true at their appointed time.”

Luke 1:19-20

Zechariah was a priest, husband of Elizabeth. In their old age they miraculously conceived, God bringing John the Baptist into the world, who was filled with the Holy Spirit even from his mother’s womb, the one who was the forerunner of Christ, “preparing the way for the Lord.”

This story is quite interesting, good to read and ponder. Zechariah had a privilege probably relatively very few priests had, and an angel met him as he did it. One has to wonder about Zechariah’s character and personality. He and his wife were righteous in the sight of the Lord, faithful to God’s will. Maybe he was a big talker, maybe not. No doubt that he did struggle some in his faith, evident in that he didn’t simply receive the angel’s message, God’s word to him without grave misgivings and doubt. Contrast that to Mary who once she got over the idea in her humility that she could be addressed and with commendation, did accept the angel’s word with the difficulties that came with it (Luke 1:26-38).

I have found myself that when I’m intent on being quiet, that’s when I might get some wisdom from God. But when I’m intent on saying a lot, or even something, not so much, if at all. I can be full of words. Better to be quiet and listen. Then one might have something to say that’s truly worthwhile.

After Zechariah’s imposed silence when he was not able to speak for over nine months, we have what is called the Benedictus, Zechariah’s Song (Luke 1:57-80). Something surely composed during or at least because of the time of silence. To hear God’s word, we must listen. In and through Jesus.

what would Jesus do? Jesus is with us by the Spirit

WWJD bracelets used to be worn by quite a few Christians, standing for “What would Jesus do?” That is not a bad question. And in order to try to understand at all what Jesus might do in a given situation, we must certainly be in scripture, particularly in the gospel accounts: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. And in prayer.

But something that can be missed in this endeavor is the reality that our Lord is indeed with us by the Spirit, that God is present in Jesus. As we seek to hear our Lord’s voice, we should refrain from raising our own voices, or depending on the voices of others. That certainly doesn’t mean that we don’t listen to others, and try to take everything into consideration. But it does mean along with that that we pray and seek the Lord’s voice so that we can somehow grasp something of the Lord’s mind and heart on any given situation.

As Christians, believers and followers of Christ, we are said to have the mind of Christ. But it’s another thing to live by that. Too often we’re moved by our own minds that have been shaped by others who are not necessarily being shaped or moved by God to know God’s will.

Even when we do think we may have something of the mind of Christ, we need to be humble, and realize that we probably don’t have all of it for a given matter. We know in part; we prophesy in part (1 Corinthians 13). Our part might indeed be an important contribution to knowing and sharing in the mind of Christ. We may be getting the heart of the matter completely right. But we need the contribution of others with their different gifts and experiences to contribute to the whole in that.

Something for all of us in Christ and a part of how we’re blessed to be a blessing.

tuning out voices contrary to the gospel

“Very truly I tell you Pharisees, anyone who does not enter the sheep pen by the gate, but climbs in by some other way, is a thief and a robber. The one who enters by the gate is the shepherd of the sheep. The gatekeeper opens the gate for him, and the sheep listen to his voice. He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. When he has brought out all his own, he goes on ahead of them, and his sheep follow him because they know his voice. But they will never follow a stranger; in fact, they will run away from him because they do not recognize a stranger’s voice.”

John 10:1-5

I am thinking today of the many discrepant voices that in one way or another can end up undermining the gospel, and drowning out the voice of the Good Shepherd.

Once you start hearing or even sensing the voice of Jesus, other voices are measured according to that, whether they are discordant, contradictory, or perhaps in harmony with his voice. But what is always needed is a hearing of the one distinct voice, which means disciplining ourselves to actually listen.

The problem is either the error of being taken up with other voices, or simply not being able to clearly hear the one voice needed. We tend to be listening to just one voice at a time as the predominating voice in our lives by which we measure all other voices. And too often it’s a voice which isn’t helpful whatsoever for our spiritual life in God through Christ.

I think I’ll be beating this drum for awhile, as I attempt to make this more a fixed practice and reality in my own life. In and through Jesus.

what is the prevailing voice in our lives?

My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me.

John 10:27

Jesus was talking to the Pharisees who saw themselves as the guardians of God’s tradition given to Moses, considered the same by a majority of Jews then. So people who listened to them may have been very well quite religious and faithful to the tradition they were brought up in. But according to Jesus that wasn’t enough. Of course Jesus was present and God had been on the move in a way in which the faith tradition had not anticipated or was prepared for.

But to us today: What are the prevailing voices in our lives? Or the prevailing voice? Often it’s our own voice in tune with voices of the past, often disparaging, and giving us a voice which is anything but helpful most of the time. We never measure up, and at least some of the time are worse than that. And then there are the voices in the world. Today in a near scream, certainly in rage, and it seems with ample justification at times, even if the rage itself is not good.

This gets to the heart of what I hope is a new revolution in my own life: the simple discipline, if you may, of practicing seeking to hear the Lord’s voice. Through the word, particularly while reading the gospel accounts (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John). With a sense of hearing the Lord’s voice. And with a focus set on listening for the Lord’s voice, so that my focus is not on my own voice and thoughts, nor on someone else’s.

I have found this particularly edifying the last few days. Like so many things that may seem to be revolutionary and helpful, they all tend to fade away in time, maybe leaving some kind of impact on one, but lost and gone. But this “discipline” might last as long as I can keep up the practice by God’s grace.

This can certainly help us to pray for others, to bring them to God’s throne because we’re living in response to the voice of the Lord, and not having our spiritual life drowned out by our own voice and many other voices.

But this does not shield us from struggles, pitfalls, and wrongdoing. But God’s grace is present always as we go back to this: listening to the voice of the Lord, the Good Shepherd who loves us, his sheep.

the sheep listen to and follow their shepherd

My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me.

John 10:27

We should meditate on God’s word regularly, day and night (Psalm 1) which should lead us to meditate on our Lord, and as I’ve put it in the past, be in interactive relationship with him, in fellowship, communion, yes, person to person.

Christianity has been called a Book faith. And it is very much tied to scripture, to the Bible. But it doesn’t stop there. It is personal and interactive with the Three Person God, who in himself is personal. And a large part of what it means to be human seems to be relational, humans living together, and in the end, God living with humans (Revelation).

To be a Christian is to be a Christ one, “in Christ.” Christ in us, and we actually in him. God in Christ: the Father and the Spirit in the Son, and the Father and the Son in union by the Spirit. And us together in Christ, so that we exist in this holy communion together. And as we see in the passage above (click the link), Christ has other sheep, so that they are brought into this communion. And that would be part of our goal through prayer, to see others hear the Good Shepherd’s voice, and join us.

For prayer, and even for all of life this seems essential. Here is a good website to help us get started and grow in this way, called Soul Shepherding. So let’s be in the Book, but from that, also in interactive fellowship with Jesus. In and through him.

one thing needed: simplify, personal, but not private

As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. She had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet listening to what he said. But Martha was distracted by all the preparations that had to be made. She came to him and asked, “Lord, don’t you care that my sister has left me to do the work by myself? Tell her to help me!”

“Martha, Martha,” the Lord answered, “you are worried and upset about many things, but few things are needed—or indeed only one.[a] Mary has chosen what is better, and it will not be taken away from her.”

Luke 10:38-42

I’m not sure which one I identify with the most: Martha, or Mary. I aspire to being a one thing kind of person like Mary was. Yet I find life is filled with so many responsibilities, and I can’t let up on any of them. Maybe this variant reading which was originally in the TNIV, but is in few other translations has merit, not only from a consideration of the manuscripts (see the NET note on Luke 10:42), but from other considerations.

Regardless, I think it’s imperative to try to simplify life as much as possible. With one goal in mind: learning to sit at Jesus’s feet and take in his words, and let them soak in. The equivalent to that today might be one’s quiet time. “Personal devotions” has taken a beating, but maybe we miss a lot by not trying to have a “quiet time” that is personal between us and the Lord. Individualism is one thing, something we should avoid, but personal another, which God wants for us all.

What has to be guarded against is the notion that it’s all about us and the Lord. It’s actually all about God’s good will in Jesus, yes for us, and for everyone else. While it should be deeply personal, it is never to be private, either, or else it’s not following the Jesus of scripture, so that it’s not actually following our Lord.

But I want to simplify all the more in the way Jesus commends here. Sitting at the Lord’s feet, so to speak, and letting his words soak into my heart and mind so as to impact my life. Something I believe I need.