thinking through, along with praying through (“on further consideration”)

…the prudent give thought to their steps.

Proverbs 14:15

It is easy to think this or that, even for a long time, and take it for granted. It is hard to dig into whether or not such thinking is close to reality, or even logical, for that matter. And I’m not pointing fingers. I can fall, and have fallen into this fallacy myself.

Rather, we need to learn to think things through, prayerfully. Of course we need to do our part, but this process is best done with others. Proverbs tells us elsewhere that there is safety in a multitude of counselors. What one person doesn’t see, there might be two or three others who do, or at least someone else. Insight from our various perspectives is helpful. And we all need to dig and ask questions.

Thinking matters through, as well as praying through until an answer comes. We need both. As we seek to do well in God’s eyes in and through Jesus.

are we communicating clearly?

Even in the case of lifeless things that make sounds, such as the pipe or harp, how will anyone know what tune is being played unless there is a distinction in the notes? Again, if the trumpet does not sound a clear call, who will get ready for battle?

When I went to seminary, I often found myself speaking over the heads of people in church. Really, I hardly knew that, except the people would tell me. I think my own wife told me. Of course we were reading books which were hard for us to understand, and we were hearing lectures that at times were steeped in theologically technical language, known only to those who had studied it.

I had the blessing of doing children’s church for a time, and that helped me speak concretely in simple terms. I think I remember even then a helper remarking that I was speaking over the children’s heads. And so between all of this, and being (still true) a firm believer that scripture should be translated in the (heart) language of the people, over time I learned to speak with simplicity and clarity.

I think it is good to stretch people a bit, intellectually. But pastors and teachers in churches are supposed to feed the sheep with the teaching of God’s truth from scripture and in Jesus. So that must be first and foremost, front and center. If anything else is added, it should be secondary to that in any church setting.

Of course an academic setting is another story. Some good intellectual challenge is important there, indeed essential, although I also think that the best academic setting will bring the students along. And in a pastoral or church-oriented context, the best education will work at helping the students speak in a way that is understood by the hearers. Otherwise, as Paul remarked in the scripture cited above—what good is it? To be honest, I need to translate in my mind the technical language I am reading in such education, so as to try to understand it well, myself. This does open up other subjects, beyond the scope of this post.

Yes, I think those in my culture seem averse, or not trained to think well, logically. And we are not adept in critical thinking. In a church setting there’s a place, hopefully, to help people love God with all of their minds, as well as in every other way. We are so easily given to laziness, and to not being able to think well critically. Hence the sound bite culture we live in.

But when it’s all said and done, we must all speak to God, and listen for his word to us—in our own heart language. It must be kept simple, where we live (and beware of information overload, as well, another subject I suppose, beyond this post).

As we go on together in Jesus for the world.