don’t despise what’s simple (the example here for the anxious, like me)

Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice! Let your gentleness be evident to all. The Lord is near. Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:4-9

We can often look at the simple as simplistic. And maybe somehow beneath us? That may or may not be what we need to humble us. But whatever may be the case, we dare not discount and put aside what might seem too obvious, for something more sophisticated and complex, even if we think that our problem is complex. It surely is, but we need to remember too that what is simple is often quite profound.

And this is no less the case in the above Scripture passage. What if we like myself, who are so prone to anxiety would start to put this passage into practice? I know there might be some who would roll their eyes thinking that this is like using a precious promise book, strewn with maybe a hundred verses we’re supposed to claim. It would be good to read the entire book of Philippians, for sure, and meditate on it all, and we need to do that, too.

Remember, the exercise itself will be beneficial, even if one is still lost in anxiety. What is true about those who suffer anxiety as I have over the years, is that the real problem is not the problem itself, but the anxiety. If one is not anxious about one thing, they’ll be anxious about something else. When one anxiety is lifted, there will be another anxiety to take its place. And what one finds out is that basically the approach to life is to be anxious, more or less filled with anxiety.

Instead we need to take this simple yet not simplistic approach of mouthing the above Scripture passage, for example, maybe after we’ve memorized it. And seeking to put it into practice in the midst of our day. If we stay at it, we’ll find eventually that the cloud will lift, that God will honor that. Always in the context of a life in which we are committed to following the Lord. Yes, in view of the full letter of Philippians, and all the rest God has given and will give us. In and through Jesus.

how do we read scripture?

I’m kind of old school in some ways. I like physical copies of the Bible, have had one near me most all of my Christian life of over four decades now. And still don’t have a smart phone (although other phones are getting smarter). Most everyone nowadays is on their phone. That’s okay, and rather beside the point of this post. Because there are excellent sites to read scripture: BibleGateway and YouVersion probably the two best places.

I think we need to do it two ways: fast and slow. And we could add medium, adding study into the mix, maybe utilizing a good study Bible, especially with biblical background notes. I think it’s important to go through all of scripture, and keep doing that. Because the more one has the entire word in their repertoire, the more they’ll get out of what they are reading. And it’s good to have biblical background too, such as details on the terrain, or what not.

For me, it’s an emphasis on the text itself. I don’t worry about trying to sort out historical detail underlying the text. God’s word is given to us just as it is for a reason. I don’t need the exact historical details. I’m not saying scripture is anti-historical. Certainly either the resurrection of Christ is history, or else our faith is a hoax. The point is that we need the word itself. Not explanations supporting it.

And we need to read it slowly, let it soak in. Memorization can help us there. I only memorize now and then. The big thing for me in this is what we call meditation. Add to that prayer. So that being in the word is about a kind of interactivity with God, hopefully bringing us into a relationship with God by faith in the good news in Jesus. But allowing God to change us by his word: our lives, our priorities, our world view (another phrase which renders me a bit old school).

Make no mistake about it. We need to get into God’s word, and be in it day and night, regularly, I say. Not just as something we aspire to, but which we practice, day after day. In and through Jesus.

learning the language and heart of contrite brokenness

Have mercy on me, O God,
    according to your unfailing love;
according to your great compassion
    blot out my transgressions.
Wash away all my iniquity
    and cleanse me from my sin.

Psalm 51:1-2

Psalm 51 is the great penitential psalm, attributed to David in the aftermath of his terrible sin in committing adultery with Bathsheba, and being complicit in her husband Uriah’s death. We know the story from scripture, and the fallout which followed. Once when I was going over the psalm and rather overcome by its magnificence, I made the statement that it arguably never would have been written apart from David’s sin, but sin is never ever worth whatever good might come out of it. Yet God is the redemptive God, in the work of redeeming sinners, and even bringing good out of what forever remains evil.

There is what’s called soaking in God’s presence. I think it’s good to soak in scripture, as well, to soak in God’s presence in scripture. And in this passage, which can help us learn both the language and heart of a contrite brokenness. Contrite in the sense of being sorry, but not sorry just over the consequences of sin, but over the sin itself, especially in the sense of being against God, and then from that, grieving over its hurt and loss it has inflicted on others. Not to suggest that we don’t find salvation even in the midst of this, as is quite evident in the psalm itself.

I am in this psalm right now, working on memorizing it to begin with, and then in prayer, offering it to God. So that it must become not only the psalmist’s prayer, but my prayer as well.

A new thought did dawn on me, something that had never occurred to me, or hit me in the same way, something I want to pray through, and perhaps somehow act on. Whatever my own thoughts and wishes, my intention is not to be in a hurry, but let this language become my own, so that the heart from that language might be my own heart, too. In and through Jesus.

we need all of it, that is, scripture

Yesterday I shared the life change I’m embarking on in simply slowing down, and Jesus’s call to be yoked together with him in his work as recorded in Matthew 11. And that day, one passage brought life to me.

But the next day was a difficult one in that I was probably experiencing one of the flaming arrows of the enemy, and experienced darkness most all day. Not the normal gray with sunshine, but clouds, I usually experience. Not that we’re to be focused on our experience, though it’s not like it’s unimportant, either. Combined with the hard work, it wasn’t easy. Add to that, being tired, and that in itself can be a challenge, and in fact, can set us up for difficult days. Of course there is always God’s grace to sustain and help us overcome such, but just the same, we’re still human. We certainly have our limitations.

So I realized in that darkness that while of course I always need the Lord, and frankly felt abandoned, which I’m sure is not the case, though sometimes God might possibly withdraw a sense of his presence for a reason, but most often, it is we who have moved, but I realized anew and afresh that we really need all of scripture. So a few passages came to mind on which I meditated: Philippians 4, James 1, and at last the great spiritual warfare passage of Ephesians 6, verses 10-20. All of that helped me, but meditating on that last passage through saying it again and again, begin to help lift me out of my darkness.

I have found along the way that it seems God impresses certain passages on my mind for my life, such as Proverbs 3:5-6 a couple years back. And I can see why, especially later on. And then the Matthew 11 passage for me on Monday. But the point here is that whether we can understand it or not, and often we won’t, we need all of scripture. And we do well to memorize certain parts. I used to memorize years back, but have avoided the practice in recent years. But now am doing it again, since I choose to no longer refer to my small Bible during work time, since there’s a new rule against phone use. And I’m finding this surprisingly, rather rejuvenating.

Of course to be in all of scripture means we need to be reading it, and/or hearing it being read. There’s much good in both. For listening, I would recommend Max McLean for a good straightforward reading of scripture, and it’s available online through Gateway. But there are other good options online and elsewhere. And there’s no substitute for reading it yourself. Actually both can have a special impact, but when you have the text in front of you, you can stop at certain points, and ponder a bit, or reread when needed.

And then there’s the good old fashioned, what some would call evangelical practice of memorizing scripture. And the more, the better, but key passages such as those I mentioned above.

The point here is that we need to be in all of scripture. We need all of it for a reason (2 Timothy 3:16-17; Romans 15:4).

For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through the endurance taught in the Scriptures and the encouragement they provide we might have hope.

Romans 15:4

May God help all of us to be more and more in his word, imbibing and living in that, receiving all we need for life, in and through Jesus.