mind set and the Spirit

For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit set their minds on the things of the Spirit. To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace.

Romans 8:5-6

What do we fill our minds with will affect our outlook on life, our very life itself. And the choices and difference here is flesh and Spirit. When we gravitate toward the things of the flesh, we will not only be influenced by that, but the flesh can take over. By flesh here, what’s really meant is all that’s not of the Spirit. The world system along with the principalities and powers which are part of that are in that mix. The Spirit involves all that is of God revealed in Christ.

What is emphasized here is perhaps both practice and disposition. We set our minds on what is of God and become acclimated to that. Or else we let ourselves drift into the thoughts and ways of the flesh, that which is in opposition to God.

If we have the Spirit through Christ, then we can set our minds on the things of the Spirit. And actually when you consider this passage (click above link), it is really something of a description of those who are in Christ and thus in the Spirit and live with a mindset given by the Spirit, and those who are in the flesh without the Spirit and therefore live with a mindset of the flesh (see NET footnotes).

A number of scholars believe that this chapter is getting at what the rest of the book addresses as a problem within the church made up of house churches in Rome. They weren’t always getting along, dividing over disputable issues in which Christians can differ. So even though this passage in Romans 8 seems to draw a stark line, it’s not like we as followers of Christ can’t falter and live apart from the Spirit. That is as plain as day in the letter of 1 Corinthians, but plain enough here too, I think.

The Spirit makes the needed difference. But it seems clear enough to me that this is not automatic, but something we’re to practice, to both set our minds on the things of the Spirit as well as on the Spirit. Regardless of what our experience is, we keep on doing that. In and through Jesus.

is our focus uplifting?

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:4-9

Taken in context, Paul’s words here call us to a mindset that is uplifting, turning our attention to what in itself is wholesome and good. This has nothing at all to do with “the power of positive thinking,” or even “possibility thinking.” Nor does it have to do with shining our light into the darkness of this world. That will more or less naturally happen wherever we go as the light of the world in Christ. But yes, inevitably as we see the better way, we’ll see that the less better ways, or what we once thought to be good, or good enough must go. So it’s not like one has their head in the sand, either.

Sometimes Christians along with others see it as their moral duty to focus on all that’s wrong, the mess of the world with the goal of exposing and rooting it out, or at least taking a stand against it. There is surely a time to speak and a time to keep silent (Ecclesiastes 3:7b). But one can become completely absorbed in that, totally occupied with it, so that there’s no time to do what we’re called to do in the passage above. I liked what I heard Dallas Willard say online in a talk, that only after one has worked hard all day, and is collapsing should they turn their attention to the news. That might be an overstatement to make a point. It’s not like we’re to ignore what’s unpleasant. But neither should that be our focus. Instead we’re to concentrate on what’s uplifting and helpful to us. Then hopefully that same spirit and practice can help others as we continue to be helped. In and through Jesus.