important, but temporary

But do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day. The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

But the day of the Lord will come like a thief. The heavens will disappear with a roar; the elements will be destroyed by fire, and the earth and everything done in it will be laid bare.[a]

Since everything will be destroyed in this way, what kind of people ought you to be? You ought to live holy and godly lives as you look forward to the day of God and speed its coming.[b] That day will bring about the destruction of the heavens by fire, and the elements will melt in the heat. But in keeping with his promise we are looking forward to a new heaven and a new earth, where righteousness dwells.

2 Peter 3:8-13

Science points out to us that the earth itself won’t last forever, nor the sun, for that matter, not even the universe as seen now. So much mystery lies in this for sure, but there’s no question that the sun (our star) and our home, earth last only so long. Yes, still many many years left, but again, not forever.

One of the ways we live in deception is the idea that we have plenty of time, or like we’re going to live forever, and that we are indestructible. Neither is the case in this world and time.

Whether we like it or not, this world has an expiration date. But the God who created everything in the first place can make a brand new creation which includes us, those who are redeemed in Christ.

Does that mean this world doesn’t matter, that we can do with it as we please? Of course not. The first book in the Bible, Genesis makes it clear that humankind is to take care of what God has given, to be good stewards of it. Creation itself brings glory to God, even in its present state of groaning.

But our primary task now as Christians, those called in Christ is to bear witness in how we live as well as what we say, to the new world coming. Then we in Christ will somehow be made new along with the old world God created. How that will happen is well beyond us, but we hold on to that promise, as we pray for others, that they would join us. And we live with that end in view. In and through Jesus.

 

beyond what is seen now

All these people were still living by faith when they died. They did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance, admitting that they were foreigners and strangers on earth. People who say such things show that they are looking for a country of their own. If they had been thinking of the country they had left, they would have had opportunity to return. Instead, they were longing for a better country—a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared a city for them.

Hebrews 11:13-16

I’m getting a little past the saturation point when it comes to politics and all the arguing, name calling, etc. I know politics has its place so I’ll still pay attention and pray and participate to some extent. And there are always issues that need to be addressed, something certain in this life. But I fear that we as Christians, or at least I, have largely lost the vision of the writer quoted above.

Sometimes what might be disparagingly called “Bible Christians” are criticized for being “so heavenly-minded, they’re no earthly good.” What might be missed there is all the good Christians have accomplished through the centuries for humanity. Everywhere you turn, you can trace back more than a little good to Christians. Sometimes though, it has been true that Christians seem not to care at all what happens here and now, thinking that the only thing that matters in the end is the life beyond this life. That is truly a short sighted view, and a misreading of the Bible.

Perhaps the best way to understand the above passage is not at all to project a “heaven” beyond this life when earth is gone. But the new creation in Jesus when heaven comes down to earth. Instead of a completely different existence, perhaps angelic-like in our imaginations where spirit replaces matter, the existence we live in now will be forever crowned with a fulfillment that we probably can’t imagine. Except what the Spirit gives us to experience or taste of that.

This hopefully will give us pause, even in the midst what attention and action we give to the politics of this world to remember what makes for lasting, even eternal change. As well as the one hope we can be assured will come. In and through Jesus.

 

living in a different world

Take hold of the eternal life to which you were called when you made your good confession in the presence of many witnesses.

1 Timothy 6:12b

It is one thing to believe with the promise of eternal life. It’s another thing to take hold of the eternal life, as Paul is saying here to Timothy. What this amounts to is living in a different world with feet solidly on the ground in the real world. And what’s involved in that is the presence of Christ in the world found in the church, the body of Christ. The groundbreaking for that was in Christ’s resurrection from the dead bringing the new life into the world destined to transform everything: the new creation in Christ.

Thankfully for us in Christ the real world is rooted in Christ. What is passing away seems front and center now, but not to us. What is front and center for us is nothing more and nothing less than the new creation in Christ. We live in a different world entirely. But to do so we too need to take hold of that world by faith. To live in that so that it permeates our lives through and through. But meant for this world, invading and somehow impacting the world through the presence and life of Christ in us. That others might see and believe. With impact on culture and judgment and final salvation to come. In and through Jesus.

 

a breathtaking view

Therefore, remember that formerly you who are Gentiles by birth and called “uncircumcised” by those who call themselves “the circumcision” (which is done in the body by human hands)— remember that at that time you were separate from Christ, excluded from citizenship in Israel and foreigners to the covenants of the promise, without hope and without God in the world. But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far away have been brought near by the blood of Christ.

For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, by setting aside in his flesh the law with its commands and regulations. His purpose was to create in himself one new humanity out of the two, thus making peace, and in one body to reconcile both of them to God through the cross, by which he put to death their hostility. He came and preached peace to you who were far away and peace to those who were near. For through him we both have access to the Father by one Spirit.

Consequently, you are no longer foreigners and strangers, but fellow citizens with God’s people and also members of his household, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, with Christ Jesus himself as the chief cornerstone. In him the whole building is joined together and rises to become a holy temple in the Lord. And in him you too are being built together to become a dwelling in which God lives by his Spirit.

Ephesians 2:11-22

Ephesians, especially the first three chapters in our Bibles, is written to see something of the vast panorama of God’s working in the new creation in Christ, with a special emphasis on the church. Unfortunately for too many of us who have been in the Bible a number of years, it can come across differently than how it did originally. That’s when we maybe need to step back, slow down, move through it slow enough, then stop, and note the beautiful portrait and scene in our mind’s eye.

The passage quoted above is very much like that. The thoughts to the original readers would have been breathtaking in themselves, and Paul surely almost breathlessly himself, unravels a glorious picture before us. So that what we end up with is a breathtaking view.

Contrast that to what is presented today as glorious, maybe even the kingdoms of the world in all their splendor as maybe through a vision, the devil showed the Lord in Jesus’s temptation in the wilderness. Really, all the world has to offer can’t compare with what God reveals to us by the Spirit in God’s word through the gospel. No, it can’t compare. In fact what comparison we do end up finding by the Spirit’s help is the difference between darkness and light. At best between what is provisional and good in its place for now, and what is perfect and to last forever.

The entire Bible especially taken together is like this. And the book in it we call Ephesians. In and through Jesus.

be yourself in the Lord

…what is that to you? You must follow me.

John 21:22b

There’s only one “straight (small) and narrow” (Matthew 7:13-14) for sure, just as there’s only one Lord, Jesus. We all are on level ground at the foot of the cross. God loves us all, and had shown that through God’s self-sacrificial death in the Son, Jesus. We’re all the same that way.

But we’re all also different. Contemporary worship music might be your choice, medieval or renaissance chants someone else’s, classical music another’s. Some of us might prefer a get away in the beauty of nature, while others enjoy the activity of a bustling city.

This doesn’t mean that we can’t be challenged by someone else in ways that can be helpful to us for change. We should always be open to whatever the Lord might want to tell us through someone else. This is part of the essential beauty of being church together. But we also need our space to simply be ourselves, the person we are and are becoming in the Lord.

This means we not only accept this freedom ourselves, but grant it to others, wherever they might be in their spiritual journey and development. God is the judge in the end. We are witnesses who want to share the difference the Lord and the gospel is making in our own lives. But each of us is as different as the endless number of snowflakes, or clouds in the sky. There’s a beauty in that, because God will reveal himself through my sister or brother in Jesus, in a way different than he will reveal himself through my life.

It is easy to believe this when we think of some people, gregarious and outgoing, maybe life of the party types. But what about those who are quiet, reserved, maybe reclusive? That’s me, actually. Yes, I can appear to be outgoing when need be. But I prefer quiet, well– with classical music in the background, being thoughtful in the word (Scripture) or in a good book.

We just need to be ourselves in Jesus. That is where God meets us. Not to make us to be like everyone or anyone else, but to help us become who he created us uniquely to be. In and through Jesus.

the difference resurrection makes

So we fix our eyes not on what is seen, but on what is unseen, since what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

2 Corinthians 4:18

Paul in his first letter to the Corinthians in our Bibles tells us that if Christ was not raised from the dead, then there’s no resurrection of the dead for us who believe in Christ, and our faith is then worthless (1 Corinthians 15:12-19). In the context (click link above), Paul is talking about fixing our eyes on what lies beyond the weakness of this present life. He makes it clear that in their following of Christ, the calling they had, their lives were on the line. This was especially true of Paul himself, who was the target of relentless attacks from those who opposed the gospel, those determined to see his life come to an end.

Today it is no less dangerous to be a Christian in some places, in fact one’s life or well being is in some way in jeopardy in many places (see Open Doors for information on this). And as I get older, I realize more and more that my days in this present life are less and less, that they are indeed numbered.

Paul encourages us to press on, fixing our eyes on what is to come in the resurrection, so that we are willing to risk it all for Christ in the present, and also so that we don’t see holding on to life as the end all, because it’s not for those of us who are “in Christ.”

Paul is not advocating a “grin and bare it” approach. Instead we’re to rejoice in the midst of our weaknesses and sufferings, because Christ and his life is present with us now, someday to be completed in no less than our resurrection when we receive our new body, raised with other believers to be presented to Christ to the glory of God.

In the mean time we live in bodily weakness, even for those of us who have a measure of good health. We enjoy God’s good creation, but we live as those who look to the new creation in Christ as present in this life for ourselves and others, and the promise in that when this life ends. In and through Jesus.

the unreal real world

“Get a life,” we sometimes think, in our own words perhaps, but when we view others who seem self-destructive, and on their path, destructive of others. Not to mention all the conflict and strife in the world, with cruel despots in power in too many places. It’s all quite real, the reality in which we live.

But it’s not at all the reality that God intended. In creation, God made everything “good” and in the end after he had created humanity it was all “very good” (Genesis 1). God’s blessing was on everything, with his full blessing contingent on whether or not humankind, that is Adam and Eve would be obedient to the only prohibition God made, that they should not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Whether or not this is symbolic or literal, the point is that Adam and Eve (humankind) had the choice of trusting God, in God’s goodness and word, or in ultimately being left to themselves, losing their so-called innocence, more like the wisdom and knowledge God was ready to pour on them. And instead knowing good and evil in their experience in a way God never intended. When Eve ate of the fruit of that forbidden tree, then Adam, their eyes were opened in a way God never intended. For the first time they felt shame and wanted to hide from each other as well as from God (Genesis 3).  And humankind has never recovered.

We live in the world as it is, not as we would like it to be, and that includes ourselves, who we are. Neither we nor the world has arrived, for sure. Instead, in biblical theological terms, we’re fallen and broken. It’s a mistake to think that somehow through the means of this present time, we can arrive to an idyllic world. It’s also equally an error to think that excuses humankind for not striving for a better world in which love for neighbor, for everyone is taken seriously. But evil has to be dealt with, sometimes in no uncertain terms.

We in Jesus have begun to live in the real world as God intended. Although it seems incremental, and sometimes all but lost in its already present / not yet completed state, nevertheless it’s as undeniable as the breath we breathe. Sometimes we’re left with just knowing intellectually, we know not why experientially, but based on faith in Christ and his historical resurrection from the dead. Other times, the experience of God’s love poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit makes life seem more than worthwhile as God’s righteousness, peace and joy (Romans 14:17-18) becomes the place in which we live.

So we in Jesus live as those of another realm in this realm. As lights in a dark world, citizens of heaven, partakers of the new creation, longing for and looking forward to the redemption of all things. In and through Jesus.