taking an inventory of one’s life

This will be my third visit to you. “Every matter must be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses.” I already gave you a warning when I was with you the second time. I now repeat it while absent: On my return I will not spare those who sinned earlier or any of the others, since you are demanding proof that Christ is speaking through me. He is not weak in dealing with you, but is powerful among you. For to be sure, he was crucified in weakness, yet he lives by God’s power. Likewise, we are weak in him, yet by God’s power we will live with him in our dealing with you.

Examine yourselves to see whether you are in the faith; test yourselves. Do you not realize that Christ Jesus is in you—unless, of course, you fail the test? And I trust that you will discover that we have not failed the test. Now we pray to God that you will not do anything wrong—not so that people will see that we have stood the test but so that you will do what is right even though we may seem to have failed. For we cannot do anything against the truth, but only for the truth. We are glad whenever we are weak but you are strong; and our prayer is that you may be fully restored. This is why I write these things when I am absent, that when I come I may not have to be harsh in my use of authority—the authority the Lord gave me for building you up, not for tearing you down.

2 Corinthians 13:1-10

“Examine yourselves to see whether you are in the faith; test yourselves. Do you not realize that Christ Jesus is in you—unless, of course, you fail the test?” These words from the Apostle Paul to the Corinthian church echo down the corridors of time all the way to us. 2 Corinthians was written in large part to get the Corinthian church back on track, as many were being influenced by false teachers within the church. We may think we live in a different day and age, but if we pay closer attention, we’ll know better. 

One of the big problems we face is the same problem that church faced: we fail to take with sufficient seriousness the message of God’s word, the exact teaching. And when we do that, there is a rationale behind it probably that makes sense to us at the time, and we’re carried away into something other than God’s will.

It is crucial to pay close attention to God’s word and to our own lives, both. The message and teaching of God’s word is meant to impact our lives, no less. But in order for that to happen, we need to prayerfully go over our lives, especially being attentive to what God might be wanting to teach us now while also being open to how we might better process the past as we receive God’s redemptive healing. The point here is that we need to examine ourselves, of course to see if we’re in the faith, yes. And also to understand so as to truly practice our faith day to day in every circumstance so that we might not only recognize Christ in us, but that others may as well. In and through Jesus.

 

 

going on what we do know

Oftentimes when I’m reading the Bible I just don’t get it. Or I should say, yes, I can give some sort of explanation for everything, but I’m left wondering about this or that. I have questions myself.

Sometimes that might be an issue of translation of Scripture, but I think more often it’s just the natural head fog we have, because we’re often spiritually obtuse, that is, unenlightened, not getting it because the message of the Bible is not meant just to be known, but to be lived out. And a big part of that is our walk by faith when we hardly know where we’re going, but trusting God for each step.

What we need to do is simply go on what we do know by faith. And keep going. Light will come to help us understand more if we just keep going. And regardless, God will give us all the light we need for life through faith in his word and the message of the gospel. In and through Jesus.

theology for real life

The book of Job is a good case in point of how all of Scripture (the Bible) is meant for real life. No one is likely to be affected much by how many angels can dance on a pin, something allegedly, Christian theologians were contemplating in the past. It’s not like we have to look for only what seems relevant and ignore the rest. We need to prayerfully consider just what God might be saying to us through everything, especially through the words found in Scripture.

I like our church’s statement of faith, because it’s not simply about knowing or confessing something. It is about applying truth to life, or letting Scripture critique and change us.

The danger in all of this is that we want quick, pat answers. We think the Bible is written for us to solve all our problems and answer all our questions. Not. Scripture, God’s word is meant to shape us according to God’s will, which means conformity to Christ.

I am blessed too to work for a solid evangelical ministry which has the motto:

The mission of Our Daily Bread Ministries is to make the life-changing wisdom of the Bible understandable and accessible to all.

We have to beware of piling in information which we’re not applying. According to James, that is a sure recipe for self-deception. We can think we’re doing well and in the clear just because of what we know. But what we’re given to know is meant to be applied, every single bit of it. We may not know how, but we should be in prayer over it. God’s word has some effect on us, whether we always get it or not. But our goal should be to listen and learn for faith and life. What we believe is meant to impact how we live. And how we live can either confirm or undermine what we believe. The two go together.

This isn’t easy. It’s not like, here it is, plain and simple, so do it. Yes and no. Because although that’s the clear path, it’s beset with challenges to our faith, so that either our roots will have to go deeper in search of God’s wisdom, or we’ll more or less give up, shrivel and die. To live in between is to remain unsettled and eventually sets us up for failure, because it won’t work (James 1:6-8).

So we have to set our sight on one thing: God and God’s will in Jesus in this life. Everything else is secondary and subsidiary to that. In and through Jesus.

practicing God’s word

Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says. Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like someone who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like. But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it—not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it—they will be blessed in what they do.

James 1:19-27

I’ve gathered a good bit of biblical theological knowledge over my life, but mostly in my head, and not so much into my heart and life, I’m afraid. Not that one can belittle what God actually has done in making us his children by faith. There certainly is a big change which accompanies that. We are turned from darkness into light. Although that’s a complete turn, it’s actually only the start.

We can say what matters most is not where we begin, but where we end. And not just what we believe, but what we practice. Not that what we believe isn’t important because after all, what we believe is what we’re to practice. Christian practice is built on Christian belief, Christian teaching, or the doctrines of the faith. But as James puts it, even the demons believe, and shudder.

So that is my intention, to begin to practice much better what I preach. Not just say something is true, but act on it. Faith is never in opposition to effort, but only in imagining that somehow we can merit or deserve God’s grace through our actions (Dallas Willard). Grace comes through Christ, not only to forgive us, but to enable us to grow through that grace. To quit doing what is not pleasing to God, but rather, what is pleasing to him. As James aptly and succinctly puts it, to not just hear God’s word, but put it into practice. In and through Jesus.

people are the problem (including me)

“Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.”

He also told them this parable: “Can the blind lead the blind? Will they not both fall into a pit? The student is not above the teacher, but everyone who is fully trained will be like their teacher.

“Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother’s eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye? How can you say to your brother, ‘Brother, let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when you yourself fail to see the plank in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.

Luke 6:37-42

Jesus reserved his harshest words, or basically got after those who pointed the finger at others. Especially the Jewish religious leaders, who were critical of those who did not line up with their traditions largely put in place to keep people from breaking God’s Law, but missing the heart of the law: love for neighbor demonstrating one’s actual love for God.

If we’re generous to others, we’ll experience generosity, but if we’re harsh, then harshness. Those who lead others do so in how they live, whether or not they really put God’s word into practice or not, whether they come to Jesus, hear his words, and put them into practice, which includes how they view others (Luke 6:46-49).

To be upset over shortcoming in others in itself should raise our suspicions: What about us? When people do light into us, what’s our reaction? Is it helpful? Is there some blindness to it, so that we can’t really see what actually was meant by the other person and why? Often enough there is fault on the other side, and maybe they are largely or entirely to blame on a given matter. But we need to step back a bit, and consider how we can grow as in grow up more toward maturity in Christ.

There may be a time to confront, but in the end, and really throughout, we need to love. To make sure our lives line up with that love toward others. Taking the plank out of our own eye, so that by our example, they might see the speck of sawdust in their own eye. In and through Jesus.

following through

Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like someone who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like. But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it—not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it—they will be blessed in what they do.

James 1:23-25

Not sure the direct analogies we can draw that are intended. Certainly the word reveals ourselves, and our flaws in not conforming to God’s will, our sins. And that’s of vital importance. And when you consider not only the immediate context, but the entire letter, change in our lives is a major focus. But it’s not only change to get rid of vices, but also to develop virtues, particularly related to relationships, how we treat each other.

James wants us to look and keep looking, with all the intent and follow through of actually practicing or doing what “the word” tells us to do, God’s word no less. Called “the perfect law that gives freedom.”

And with our attempts to do so, as imperfect as they inevitably will be, we’re promised God’s blessing. A blessing we want not only for ourselves, but for others. In and through Jesus.

hearing (reading) and doing

Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says. Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like someone who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like. But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it—not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it—they will be blessed in what they do.

James 1:22-25

One of our biggest challenges as believers in Christ (James 2:1) is put  God’s word into practice. As those who are born from above, we naturally love God’s instruction. And that means that we’ll want to obey it, and will be unhappy, or at least unfulfilled when we don’t. James calls this a deception, actually a self-deception, when we hear or read God’s word, yet don’t put it into practice.

It seems like the fallacy here is to know, but fail to do. We somehow think knowing is enough. To hear and read God’s word is important; we do need to pay close attention to it, just as James says in the passage above. But for James that means, not only to hear it, but do it.

Of course in order to do, we must know what to do. So a certain kind of knowledge precedes doing. We have to be careful here, especially in an age when knowledge seems to be just about everything. It’s not enough to know God’s will. It’s evidently easy to be deceived into thinking that’s enough. At the same time, we need to be in the process of reading and meditating on all of scripture. And basic before that, humbly accepting the word planted in us, which can save us (James 1:21).

And after this, after the passage quoted above, James gives us a word to apply:

Those who consider themselves religious and yet do not keep a tight rein on their tongues deceive themselves, and their religion is worthless. Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world.

James 1:26-27

doing the word (not just hearing it)

Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says. Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like someone who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like. But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it—not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it—they will be blessed in what they do.

James 1:22-25

It has been dawning on me recently, the idol I had made out of certainty in my life, and how I often am not at rest until I would have it for brief periods of time. Like so often, the realization of truth comes with some relief. “I can see it,” and “wow!” But it won’t be long before we will lapse into pretty much where we were before if we don’t begin to put it into practice.

In my case, I had been thinking about that just recently, and posted on it on Saturday morning, only to be besieged Saturday evening with new revelations which put me back into a kind of panic mode and desire to overcome my uncertainty. The Lord helped me to have the strength the next morning to be able to put that aside, and simply to attempt to act on the truth which I had posted the previous morning. But this reminded me of the necessity of putting into practice what we hear from God’s word.

For people like me who have been in all of the Bible for years, and who teach it on a regular basis as well, this can be challenging. And really all of us as Christians should be in the word on a regular basis, weekly at our church gatherings as we hear it proclaimed and taught, and during our own times throughout the week, hopefully daily, as well as in our small groups. We all need to be in the word, so that we can “hear” God speak to us through that word. And with that, it is critical that we begin to act on what God has said, and keep working at it, not letting it go, but letting it become part of the fabric of our lives.

I am thankful for the church we’ve been taking our grandchildren to, that they make this a big deal: both being in the word, and putting it into practice. This is what I want to major on the rest of my life, both reading for understanding, and putting into practice what God is telling me, is telling us, in and through Jesus.

continuing on through the difficulties

So many disappointments and perplexities come and go. I am terribly grieved by them. It seems like we are set in our ways and not easily changed. Change is ultimately God’s work, not our own, and yet we’re to enter and remain in that process by faith.

For me in spite of that I want to continue on in the gospel through scripture and the church. Though all around me seems to give way, and I lose heart as well, I have to keep picking up my feet and moving on, trying to find God and God’s will and help in the midst of it. It’s not easy.

That is why a monastic kind of life has much appeal to me. You do the prayers, the chants of the psalms for example, the scripture readings- day after day, no matter what. You keep doing that. And you don’t stop. And you do that in a communal, or church setting, as church.

Over time one finds they are shaped by that. But it is so incremental that it is hardly noticeable except for significantly long enough periods, say two years more or less. We are shaped both by what we are attentive to and think about, and by what we practice which includes the not doing as well as the doing.

This is not supposed to be legalistic and binding to the point of feeling condemned when we may slip up and fail to practice it. It’s rather something self-imposed, so to speak, something we choose to do. A good biblical, theological understanding of baptism helps us see that we have no choice in the matter in that we’re to live a new life out of death in and through Jesus. But that bondage is into a new freedom which doesn’t press us toward any condemnation should we run into days when we don’t follow through. We end up doing these things because we want to, not because we have to. And our want helps us through the times when we may not feel like it, actually helps us to live beyond feelings all together.

This is important for me now. I must go on regardless. God is present with us individually and together in and through Jesus.