the need for human resolve with the grace of God

His divine power has given us everything we need for a godly life through our knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and goodness. Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature, having escaped the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.

For this very reason, make every effort to add to your faith goodness; and to goodness, knowledge; and to knowledge, self-control; and to self-control, perseverance; and to perseverance, godliness; and to godliness, mutual affection; and to mutual affection, love. For if you possess these qualities in increasing measure, they will keep you from being ineffective and unproductive in your knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.

2 Peter 1:3-8

Human resolve gets bad press in Christian circles for good reason. We can’t do it on our own, period. The end. We either come up with something which is more or less a coping mechanism, or we might enter into a false sense of security and well being which won’t hold up in the long haul, or we might just cave in and give up. One thing I want to add here: If we have mental health issues, that is no shame whatsoever. There is much needed wisdom from God within psychology, as well as medical help if needed.

We see in 2 Peter here, that Peter (I say) helps us see that from the grace of God in Christ, we humans can resolve and do better on any given issue. We should never think it will just be a snap of our fingers, and we’ll be relieved overnight. No, we need to think of it more as a long term work project, so that our commitment is beyond the moment or time we make it. But that this commitment, indeed resolve, as we call it, resolution is actually indeed necessary, and through God’s grace in what God gives us for life and godliness, is necessary for us help to make actual progress against whatever our struggle is. For me over the years, I think my prevailing issue has been anxiety. Whatever it is, God can and wants to help us. But we must take the bull by the horns and take hold of such help. Take what God gives us, and make the needed effort.

God’s grace given to us doesn’t mean we’re passive. We have to say enough is enough. But remember too, that whatever progress we make, while our effort is required comes only through the grace, meaning the gift and help God gives us. Through everything, whatever we’re facing each day. God will not only see us through, but help us to do better, grow, and ultimately to see substantial improvement, maybe even making that problem more or less a thing of the past. But this basic is ongoing in our lives, since we never arrive to perfection in this life. Given to us in and through Jesus.

prayer makes the needed difference, because the Lord makes that difference

Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.

Elijah was a human being, even as we are. He prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the land for three and a half years. Again he prayed, and the heavens gave rain, and the earth produced its crops.

James 5:16-18

I suppose many think Christian prayer is basically psychological. We pray to our imagined deity, and then we feel better because of all kinds of human dynamics involved in that, one simply being that we’re no longer focused on a problem as if it all depends on us. While what we call psychological factors may well be in play, Christians know by experience I say, that there’s much much more. Yes, we have tried this, and we have seen the difference it makes.

The difference for us is no less than personal. In prayer we’re interacting with a personal being. And that difference we witness and desire is not just for our own well being, but for the good of others, even including our enemies. And we especially see it at work both for ourselves and those we pray for.

Prayer makes a difference because the Lord is the one who makes that difference. Of course we have to pray. We have to bring our petitions to God and keep doing so. We can rest assured that as we do, in time, yes in the Lord’s time the answer will come. At least God’s peace, that God will take care of it, even if we don’t get the answer we wanted.

But yes, this is not mere psychological experience. Much much more. We have experienced that over and over again. In and through Jesus.

don’t worry. pray.

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

“Don’t worry, be happy” was a saying going around from a song which has some truth to it, but superficiality as well. Not so what Paul tells us here. This is truth which speaks to where we live. But we have to apply it, put it into practice.

To do that, one ought to read the entire letter and let that soak in. And along with that, the rest of the New Testament, starting with the gospel accounts (Matthew, Mark, Luke and John). And the rest of Scripture. We need to see all of life within the big picture. God’s Story.

But we can start here. We’ll do this imperfectly for sure. We should just do it, refusing to be swallowed up with anxiety and worry. To be overcome with anxiety and possibly the panic that comes with that means we’re not trusting. We need to trust God no matter what. No matter what. And do what Paul tells us here. We’ll get the help we need. In and through Jesus.

*I want to add as a footnote to this post. Some may need counseling and medication. There is no shame in that, none whatsoever. That’s a part of being human. Before one goes that route, one should do what they can, hold their ground, and seek to trust. Sometimes there are both psychological and physiological factors that need to be taken seriously, which attended to, can help.

when overwhelmed with darkness

A song. A psalm of the Sons of Korah. For the director of music. According to mahalath leannoth. A maskil of Heman the Ezrahite.

Lord, you are the God who saves me;
day and night I cry out to you.
May my prayer come before you;
turn your ear to my cry.

I am overwhelmed with troubles
and my life draws near to death.
I am counted among those who go down to the pit;
I am like one without strength.
I am set apart with the dead,
like the slain who lie in the grave,
whom you remember no more,
who are cut off from your care.

You have put me in the lowest pit,
in the darkest depths.
Your wrath lies heavily on me;
you have overwhelmed me with all your waves.
You have taken from me my closest friends
and have made me repulsive to them.
I am confined and cannot escape;
my eyes are dim with grief.

I call to you, Lord, every day;
I spread out my hands to you.
Do you show your wonders to the dead?
Do their spirits rise up and praise you?
Is your love declared in the grave,
your faithfulness in Destruction?
Are your wonders known in the place of darkness,
or your righteous deeds in the land of oblivion?

But I cry to you for help, Lord;
in the morning my prayer comes before you.
Why, Lord, do you reject me
and hide your face from me?

From my youth I have suffered and been close to death;
I have borne your terrors and am in despair.
Your wrath has swept over me;
your terrors have destroyed me.
All day long they surround me like a flood;
they have completely engulfed me.
You have taken from me friend and neighbor—
darkness is my closest friend.

Psalm 88

Sometimes, especially for some of us, we feel quite down and not far from despair. At times lack of sleep may be the culprit; we need proper sleep. But some of us easily drift into this state of despondency when so much seems wrong to us, or when at least we don’t feel good inside.

This is so very true with the psalmist here. Someone said they made darkness an idol. I don’t agree at all. They were simply stating their experience to God.

The crucial point for us to hold on to when we’re struggling is the importance of addressing our concerns and baring our heart to God, holding nothing back. We can see that eloquently done in this psalm.

I like the way this psalm ends with a sense of being stuck in the mire, lost in the darkness, akin to “the dark night of the soul.” Because it’s real to life, not some phony pretense of saying “All is well” when it’s not.

Fortunately the Bible and the psalms don’t end there. God is good and God will work everything out for good. When we don’t see the good, when essentially we don’t feel good, we need to practice what the psalmist does here. Cry out to God, and keep talking to God, looking to God for the help that only God can give. In and through Jesus.

(Medical and/or psychological help may also be needed. Some of us are just more prone this way, but others need special help. And that can include any of us. So we need to be open to that possibility, as well.)