wisdom in the real world

One of the major themes of Scripture is wisdom. We have wisdom books: Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Job, even Song of Songs. And some of the Psalms. I would like to include James from the New Testament, and you can find snippets of wisdom everywhere throughout Scripture.

What marks out Biblical wisdom is “the fear of God” which is foundational to it. But also it’s plain to see that the wisdom talked about in Scripture is for us as we really are, for life as it really is, not some idealized version.

I think this is important, because it might be easy for us to give up on the pursuit of wisdom, or think we really haven’t received it from God, because we’re so aware of our flaws. But the wisdom given is for flawed people, yes, to help us walk in the way of God, and not in our own way. But also to help us do better, both unlearn and learn, and continue, not only in the way of wisdom, but as life-long seekers of it.

We’re told that Christ is our wisdom. Ultimately we find God’s wisdom in him, and actually to understand all the rest is to see it in light of him. This is from Scripture, God’s written word, and the Spirit. So that means we don’t leave any of the Scripture witness behind. And we especially mark all that is pointed and helpful for us on our journey. As we continue on in the way of wisdom. In and through Jesus.

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dial down and accept the ordinary

If your law had not been my delight,
I would have perished in my affliction.

Psalm 119:92

I’m more and more convinced that one formidable enemy of the good is misplaced expectation. This is probably true across the board, but I’m thinking of the spiritual life of a Christian, or the spiritual lives of Christians.

I’ve lived as a Christian several decades, and from early on was inundated with “deeper life” teachings. And I’ve witnessed some of emphasis on the Spirit in individual lives and in the church. And I’ve partaken of a few unusual experiences and participated in some of that myself. And we all as Christians have experienced the closeness of the Lord, which I believe is actually something for us daily, but probably not in the way we expect.

I want to say and even emphasize that it’s of the utmost importance for us to dial down and accept the ordinary. That most of our lives are going to seem mundane, boring, lonely, difficult, etc., you fill in the blanks. As soon as we get away from ideals, immediately we’ll be better off. We’ll then and only then begin to be able to appreciate the good from God that’s right in front of us, and actually everywhere. Until then we’ll miss the good that’s right in our face.

Scripture doesn’t present an easy, feel good existence. Just begin to read on almost any page. But as the psalmist says, Scripture as God’s written word not only can keep us grounded, our feet on the ground so to speak, but can actually be our delight even in the midst of the ordinary and difficult aspects of real life.

When we realize that our expectations are simply unmet, then we’ll be able to see and accept the actual blessings God is giving us, but not until then.

Am I suggesting that God can’t bless the socks off of us, of course to not only bless us, but bless others through us? Of course not. But only as we accept the reality of our own brokenness, that the kingdom in its fullness, while present now in Jesus by the Spirit is yet to be fully present in the finished transformative way. Until then, we’re set up for disappointment and disillusionment.

Which is why we need to remain in God’s word, in Scripture, so that God’s Word, Christ himself can touch and begin to transform us now. Yes, in the midst of the ordinary and difficult. In and through Jesus.

what world do you live in?

Now that same day two of them were going to a village called Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem. They were talking with each other about everything that had happened. As they talked and discussed these things with each other, Jesus himself came up and walked along with them; but they were kept from recognizing him.

He asked them, “What are you discussing together as you walk along?”

They stood still, their faces downcast. One of them, named Cleopas, asked him, “Are you the only one visiting Jerusalem who does not know the things that have happened there in these days?”

“What things?” he asked.

“About Jesus of Nazareth,” they replied. “He was a prophet, powerful in word and deed before God and all the people. The chief priests and our rulers handed him over to be sentenced to death, and they crucified him; but we had hoped that he was the one who was going to redeem Israel. And what is more, it is the third day since all this took place. In addition, some of our women amazed us. They went to the tomb early this morning but didn’t find his body. They came and told us that they had seen a vision of angels, who said he was alive. Then some of our companions went to the tomb and found it just as the women had said, but they did not see Jesus.”

He said to them, “How foolish you are, and how slow to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Did not the Messiah have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself.

Luke 24:13-27

“What world do you live in?” is kind of a rhetorical question, thus not requiring a definitive answer, but causing us more to reflect on just what we perceive reality to be. And certainly includes myself. I struggle with this myself, I would say, of course.

We are creatures of experience as well as what we have observed to be true. It’s hard to get hold of just why we see life as we do. Certainly experiences from the past, especially in formative childhood times contribute significantly to that.

For me, it’s easy to get down over so many things. But that’s when more than ever, but really as a habit of life, I need to get in and remain in scripture. Scripture takes us through all kinds of worlds in the sense of experience, but lands us where we need to be, and helps us find what is lacking. Scripture as God’s word impacts us in ways we can’t actually completely comprehend. But the difference is unmistakable. It was so after Jesus talked to these two followers.

As they approached the village to which they were going, Jesus continued on as if he were going farther. But they urged him strongly, “Stay with us, for it is nearly evening; the day is almost over.” So he went in to stay with them.

When he was at the table with them, he took bread, gave thanks, broke it and began to give it to them. Then their eyes were opened and they recognized him, and he disappeared from their sight. They asked each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked with us on the road and opened the Scriptures to us?”

They got up and returned at once to Jerusalem. There they found the Eleven and those with them, assembled together and saying, “It is true! The Lord has risen and has appeared to Simon.” Then the two told what had happened on the way, and how Jesus was recognized by them when he broke the bread.

Luke 24:28-35

The face change here had to become a change of heart and a transformation of life. The world we believers and followers of Jesus inhabit is one marked by God’s word to us in Jesus, and whatever follows that.

We have to learn by faith to more and more live in the world in which Jesus is at the center. And into which God is always speaking. Regardless of what else is going on. The real world in and through Jesus.

the real world: Christians and the state/politics

The idea of “the real world” can be as different as night and day in what Christians mean, and from that, how they act. John Stackhouse, a Baptist theologian, believes something like a kind of realism which accepts the good and bad, along with the limitations in government, and makes the most of it, of course trying to arrive to what’s best, but realizing there will inevitably be shortfalls and issues and new problems will arise. Then there’s the meaning of “the real world” which might come from what’s called a Christian anarchist position, here summarized well by Greg Boyd. It basically takes the position that what happens in worldly government is rather beside the point for the follower of Christ. They should be living with one world in mind, God’s kingdom present in Jesus. So for them, that’s the real world. The rest is a charade, or worse. Destined for God’s judgment.

I see something of both perspectives when I look at scripture. The realism advocated which says Christians can and even should get their hands dirty by getting involved in civil societies, of course doing so with integrity and Christian truth, we can see clearly enough in Daniel, and to some extent, arguably, in the New Testament itself. The other position is clearly seen in the gospels: Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. What Jesus calls his disciples to, God’s kingdom present in him, certainly political itself in that it is a way of life under his rule.

What might be a determining factor is to read what follows in what unfolds after Christ’s resurrection and ascension and the outpouring of the Spirit. It does seem to emphasize what our witness in the world is to be as the church and as believers. It really doesn’t say anything about Christians serving in government, but rather how Christians are to respond to government. There are instances of people in the New Testament who have faith and serve in government positions.

So at this point I think like life, it’s complex. It is easy to simply withdraw. But it seems to me more Jesus-like to remain in society, but with a different message. After all, if we don’t have a different answer, then what is distinctive about us as Christians? Isn’t what we’re called to live, and if necessary die for, the gospel, the good news of God in Jesus? Regardless of just how we come down on the question of Christians and the state, there should be no question that this is what distinguishes us from the world.

And that will require a different track and wisdom, I think, then what we see from either the Christian left or Christian right in the United States. Both fail in compromising by not holding to the gospel as paramount in every consideration. Miserably. I take neither one of them seriously at all, myself. Both fail because in one way or another, their witness to Christ and the gospel is compromised. That ought to be our first and foremost concern: how will what we do or not do in the world impact our witness to Christ?

Maybe the best position is to leave the answer a bit nebulous, uncertain, but major on what we do know is our calling: to be faithful to Christ and the gospel. We must avoid any position that mixes the cross and the flag together. However we think our responsibilities to the state are to be played out, like paying taxes, and honoring those in authority, we must make it clear to all that Christ’s kingdom is different, not from this world, though down to earth, but in a completely different way. We certainly do good works to help people in need, and solve problems.

Something for our consideration, or at least what I’ve been considering lately. As we ponder what it means as Christians and the church to be a faithful witness in the world. In and through Jesus.

the Bible: real people, the real world

I heard or read that a Christian leader of the past wanted his biography to include warts and all. I appreciate that. And that’s exactly what the Bible does. Read the list of names in Hebrews 11 for example. David is a prime example of what I’m talking about. Real people who made mistakes, some glaring ones, old fashioned sin, yet repented, and found their way in God.

And the Bible refers to a real world, not some make believe existence which really is not present, except on TV or something make believe. But also the Bible awakens us to the world as God conceived and created it to be, the beginning of which is found in Christ in the new creation. The church is the integral part of that, through faith in the good news in Jesus, in scripture, and baptism. It is already a God-centered world, not man-centered. And someday that will all be not only evident to all, but really the “air” everyone breathes, when heaven and earth become one in Jesus.

I like that, because I’m a real person who struggles just like everyone else, and has not done as well as I should have at certain parts of my life. But has also repented, and continues to repent, as needed. What we need is truth, and all of it. Truth exposes us, but it also leads us to what we were made for in the first place. We have to be open to it, to other possibilities other than the myths we’ve grown up with. The true myth, since myth itself does not necessarily mean what isn’t true. It is a representation of what actually is real in a world that embraces what’s really not. Truth is found in the one who claimed that he himself is the way and the truth and the life (John 14:6).

Again, that’s why I much prefer the Bible. It tells the truth about ourselves, but it also shows us what God wants. Beginning in this life, and fulfilled completely in the next, in and through Jesus.

accepting the truth and reality about ourselves

Humility in short is simply accepting and acknowledging the truth, as well as seeking to live accordingly. It will involve repentance at certain points along the way because truth in scriptural terms is about life, as well as the fact of the matter concerning reality. Truth and light go together in scripture (see 1 John 1 and John 1). The light shines on the darkness, exposing the truth about ourselves. We either rebel by somehow rationalizing our way around it, hide from it, or else simply accept it and repent. Repentance is both a change of heart and life.

This light is most certainly on ourselves, and that’s where it must begin. But it’s also on everything else, and as we seek to accept it fully for ourselves and our own life, we may then begin to see it more fully in terms of helping others around us, and seeing the world more for what it is. So that we can see through what might appear to be good to what the motives might really be along with the end result. Of course we must beware of trying to judge the motives of others. We can’t fully understand even ourselves, much less others. But we might be able to help others with something of the help we receive from God.

We can never see like God sees. “God is light, and in him is no darkness at all.” That can be said only of God. We are children of light in and through Jesus, not of the darkness, and therefore Jesus tells us that we’re to live as children of light (John 12:30-36; Ephesians 5:8-14).

Light exposes, but in scripture it also brings health (Malachi 4:2). We need to be those who more and more live in the light. To both dispel our darkness, and help others find that same light. In and through Jesus.

worship of God

“Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

John 4:21-24

The Greek word here translated “worshipers”: προσκυνητής, simply means worshipers. προσκυνέω is the verb here (“will worship”; “worship”; “must worship”), the surface meaning: “to worship, pay homage, show reverence; to kneel down (before)”, the definition according to biblical usage of the term: “to do reverence, or homage by kissing the hand; in NT to do reverence or homage by prostration, Mt. 2:2, 8, 11; 20:20; Lk. 4:7; 24:52; to pay divine homage, worship, adore, Mt. 4:10; Jn. 4:20, 21; Heb. 1:6; to bow one’s self in adoration, Heb. 11:21” (Bill Mounce).

I am afraid that in our rationalistic way of approaching life, and I can speak well for myself, that the lifting up of hands, and bowing down is just something many of us don’t naturally do. And our romantic reaction against rationalism may not be much better. The passage here brings both together. We are to worship the Father in both spirit, and in truth. And of course the outward things we do might be empty religious exercises or rituals. Yet it seems both from the Bible and life that what we practice can change the way we both think and feel. As well as what we think and feel influencing what we do.

There are other words to consider, translated “worship,” in our Bibles, but I want to look at this one word for now. The word is used in other places (see passages listed above) for worship and adoration of Jesus, as well.

What we fix our minds on is ultimately what we worship. Or where we get our enjoyment. I’m not referring to necessary things we must give our attention to, nor enjoyment of the gifts God has given us. I am referring to what we value the most, what takes priority over everything else. And oddly enough in worshiping God, everything else as in the good gifts of God, is appreciated all the more, but in its proper place.

And worship of God is not something we do to get something out of it. We do it simply because God deserves every bit of it, and as a response to both who God is, and what he has done for us (Romans 12:1-2).

The worship spoken of here in John 4 and elsewhere, is what I want to intentionally purse and grow in, in days to come. In and through Jesus.