trying to catch one’s breath

Sometimes life comes at us hard from several directions, rather than the steady hum we may have become accustomed to. Or perhaps it is just crazy from one source. There is no question that life can become hectic at times for a number of reasons.

Recently I was driving through an area I’m not used to, and had to stop behind a school bus. Afterward I went forward to get to the light, which I don’t think was that far away. But I had failed to notice the yellow flashers on, and was picked up for doing 40 miles per hour in a 25 mile per hour school zone. That was a pretty hefty fine, relatively speaking, although the police officer did reduce it to a charge of doing 30 miles per hour, which helped. I thanked him for doing his job, and know it’s important for him to protect the person helping direct pedestrians (I take it) in that zone at specific times. But it made me adopt a new practice of staying in the right hand side and making sure I don’t go over the speed limit, which is a novel idea, since it’s commonly thought that they give you a certain amount over. Though technically they can ticket you for being one mile an hour over the speed limit.

Maybe that will be a helpful event in my life, since it reminds me to slow down, something a friend who was over me at work once encouraged me to do a few years back, so that I to some extent took his advice. And yet some pressure to get things done will inevitably put us in a position in which we have to move at a faster pace than we ordinarily would. One axiom that has helped me is to simply do one thing at a time, and then the next, and the next. And also to try to minimize the hectic, so that one can act purposeful, work hard, yet not be in a hurry. A popular term nowadays is “Don’t work hard; work smart.” Being a bit more old school, I have a hard time with that, because it seems like the application of that sometimes is to not work at all. And yet there’s plenty of truth in it. I often think about how to do what we’re doing in an easier way, because it will likely often be hard, regardless. But to make it easier for more efficient work.

All of that to say, I really don’t have any one good answer on just how we can catch our breath. I do believe we need some good down times of quiet and being in prayer before the heavenly Father. And where we can, it is good to avoid having being in a hurry, planning and thinking ahead so that we can be as efficient as possible. But not being rushed in spirit. That can be a challenge for sure, at times.

Where we can, we need to take the time for needed rest. And for simply being present. A rest which is about knowing others, and especially the One who made and loves us: God. Something I haven’t been all that good at in my lifetime, though knowing God comes by simple faith. So a rest from our own hard labor, and a rest in God, which scripture talks about at various places. But I leave us with our Lord’s words:

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

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back to work

Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? Run in such a way as to get the prize. Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize.

1 Corinthians 9:24-27

Paul’s words need to be seen in context (link takes you to 1 Corinthians 9 and 10). This was all for the gospel, which is all about reaching people. It means the good news, so that is Paul’s aim given his mission. And by extension it seems clearly that he is calling the entire Corinthian church to the same commitment, of course in their various callings, but this one call directing all of that.

It’s our mentality and attitude up front that is crucial, which is why we’re told that we’re not to be conformed to this world, but instead transformed by the renewing of our minds. Paul’s heart and mind were for Christ and the gospel, and involved in that is not only the message, but the medium for the message which must never contradict the message itself. Paul, and by extension we are that medium. Yes, not all of us are called to proclaim the good news like Paul was as the apostle to the Gentiles. But we are all called to be witnesses to it, which will involve both word and deed. Our lives must line up with what we say, otherwise our words will be empty.

It is utterly crucial for anyone in the ministry to take the hard discipline Paul exerts on himself to heart for themselves. When you read the passage in context (again, see link above) you will note that it’s about the gospel, and with reference to sexual immorality and idolatry. Money, power and sex, not necessarily in that order, have grounded many an aspiring person to follow Christ. Or perhaps it uncovered their true heart. At any rate, we are told in this passage that we all must be careful, and beware lest we fall into the same trap (1 Corinthians 10:1-13).

Yes, we are present to work, to roll up our sleeves and be in God’s work by his grace in Jesus. Whatever form that work might take. What God has put in front of us, what we can do and find joy in doing in that work, we must give ourselves to fully. Rest is good, and must be incorporated along the way. But the work is what we’re called to, and what we must not let go of. And that requires a commitment and the discipline that goes with that. All for the gospel in and through Jesus.

work in part as a remedy to the soul

[Elijah] replied, “I have been very zealous for the Lord God Almighty. The Israelites have rejected your covenant, torn down your altars, and put your prophets to death with the sword. I am the only one left, and now they are trying to kill me too.”

The Lord said to him, “Go back the way you came, and go to the Desert of Damascus. When you get there, anoint Hazael king over Aram. Also, anoint Jehu son of Nimshi king over Israel, and anoint Elisha son of Shaphat from Abel Meholah to succeed you as prophet. Jehu will put to death any who escape the sword of Hazael, and Elisha will put to death any who escape the sword of Jehu. Yet I reserve seven thousand in Israel—all whose knees have not bowed down to Baal and whose mouths have not kissed him.”

1 Kings 19:14-18

I don’t condone all that is written in the Old Testament and ascribed even to God’s servants. Some of it I see as plain wrong in light of Christ. I refer in this passage to the violence ascribed to the upcoming prophet, not to mention the violence done by Elijah himself. But they were people in process and God was moving them along in preparation for what was to come in the fulfillment in Jesus. That said, there is much we can learn from all the pages of scripture, and something (even if we don’t always know what) from every passage, at least in context. And this passage is no exception.

Elijah had a mountain top experience so to speak on Mount Carmel challenging the prophets of Baal, with a miraculous, powerful witness of the reality and supremacy of Yahweh. But afterward he fled from a threatening Queen Jezebel, and sunk into a deep depression. God took care of him and eventually put him back to work, giving him something to do (click the link above for this story from 1 Kings 17-19).

I find for myself that keeping busy is important for maintaining my equilibrium emotionally. We do need our times of rest, for sure; that is important. But I have often found work a blessing, especially when I’m troubled by something, which was the case here with Elijah. God did give him an answer to his thought, but also put him to work.

Work is a blessing. Work then rest is a cycle for us physically in this life. Spiritually we want to work from and out of God’s rest in Jesus in which we live. Nevertheless we do work, God has something important for all of us to do. Especially for the blessing and good of others, as well as providing for our own needs, and gathering the provisions God gives us. In and through Jesus.

relax into routine: part of rest

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

Some jobs seem so high stress, and maybe to a point are, especially at certain junctures. But once we get used to them, they can in a way become “old hat” to us. We can learn to settle down, maybe slow down, and simply be at rest.

Jesus’s words invite us into that kind of activity, even routine of being at rest when we work. Because he is with us, we are with him, and he is making the load light.

Part of living in this world though is to live under the curse of Genesis 3:

To Adam [the LORD God] said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’

“Cursed is the ground because of you;
    through painful toil you will eat food from it
    all the days of your life.
It will produce thorns and thistles for you,
    and you will eat the plants of the field.
By the sweat of your brow
    you will eat your food
until you return to the ground,
    since from it you were taken;
for dust you are
    and to dust you will return.”

Genesis 3:17-19

Humankind in the story is agrarian at that point: working the ground to plant and cultivate vegetation and fruit was a large part of what they did. But now they would have to contend with all sorts of problems. Creation would seem to become at odds with itself.

And that’s what we find in our work, even though most of it is not agriculture. Even with human manipulation, we run into all sorts of problems. Humanity is inherently limited. Although it appears from Genesis 11 that they are more than capable intellectually, so that in that story God stopped what they were doing. Knowledge is not enough. Humanity needs wisdom as well, and not the worldly wisdom of the serpent, but the loving wisdom of the kingdom of God and the shalom (translated “peace” and including the meaning of flourishing) that comes with it.

Somehow we need, even in the midst of trouble and seeming failure to learn to have a restful spirit in all we do. Not given to panic, not in fear of this or that. And even when we have to “grab the bull by the horns,” so to speak, we need to do so as people who are at rest. Believing that our work is not only God-ordained, work being good, part of creation, but that also we do so as those who would be in gospel kingdom work with our Lord, which somehow can be weaved into the other work, and maybe become a part of it.

That’s my goal, to relax into the routine, becoming more and more at rest in and through Jesus.

learning to be at rest

The apostles gathered around Jesus and reported to him all they had done and taught. Then, because so many people were coming and going that they did not even have a chance to eat, he said to them, “Come with me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.”

So they went away by themselves in a boat to a solitary place. But many who saw them leaving recognized them and ran on foot from all the towns and got there ahead of them.When Jesus landed and saw a large crowd, he had compassion on them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd. So he began teaching them many things.

Mark 6:30-34

There is no question that we all need some rest from our work. Which is why the Sabbath was made for humans (not humans for the Sabbath), as Jesus said. Although Israel added cumbersome laws, even allegedly from God which could make what had been intended as a blessing, a burden.

In this gospel account quoted above, Jesus is recognizing the need of his disciples (and perhaps himself, as well) to get away and get some rest from the incessant clamoring crowd. But they couldn’t escape, and Jesus had compassion on them, and his teaching was followed by the feeding of the 5,000.

So in this case, and surely in many other cases servants of God don’t get the rest they want, and frankly think they need. What is to be done when such is the case?

We have to be faithful and serve those in need. But we also need to guard our downtime to some extent. We need to plan for safe getaways, but be ready to have our plans altered. There are times when there’s no escape from pressing need.

During such times, we need to be at rest in our minds and hearts, in our spirit. In dependence on God through trust in him, we can learn to experience rest in the midst of busyness and even tumult. We need to learn to live in God’s rest, and in the yoke that Jesus offers us. But not supposing there is no end to what we can do. We are human, and we need our sleep, for one thing. We need quiet and rest. But we also need that in our spirits in the midst of a busy life.

The words of Jesus are for us today:

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

true faith struggles, as well as rests

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4

Again and again and again, we have to apply the words of scripture. Wouldn’t it be nice if we only had to do it once, and then it would be done, complete? But not so in this life, though we do want to grow so that when the same problem comes to us, or we find ourselves in the same state of mind, that somehow it is better than before. That would be good, even though at times we seem to be worse than before.

My goal in life in part is to live by faith. Living by faith does not exclude struggle, or feeling at times lost, and perhaps even undone. It does mean that in whatever we’re experiencing, or facing, we do so in faith, which means taking the words of scripture, God’s word, to heart, choosing by faith to act on them. Such times are every bit as much a part of the faith life, as the times when we’re at rest and peace. All of this a part of our lives here and now in and through Jesus.

negotiating rest

“Come with me by yourselves to a quiet place and get some rest.”

Mark 6

I’m not the worst when it comes to rest, since I can do it just about any time, maybe due to a degree of sleep deprivation over the years. But when it comes to simply resting when on vacation, I chafe a little under the bit. Work for me is where it’s at. I need to be doing something.

Jesus’s words to his disciples came in the midst of a busy season for them, full of ministry to many people. And even when they were endeavoring to get away, a crowd pressed in, Jesus changed his plans, and what followed was the feeding off the five thousand.

Rest in our day surely means to unplug and stay that way, except for an emergency phone call. Being present for others certainly means that at times our rest stops will be interrupted. But we need to be committed to slowing down, even stopping. Simply being in a place where we can rest alone and in quiet. We are little aware just how much we need such times to undo our frazzled, ever moving interior experience, which we see as normal.

We need to learn to be at rest with the Lord, leaving our own propensity to strive and at times even panic, behind. Just the fact that Jesus called his disciples to this, and more than once, is instructive for us today. We need those getaways from our immediate surroundings, yes from the internet. If at home, simply in quiet. We need to simply stop and do nothing. In the presence of the one who can help us enter into the Sabbath rest in which we are refreshed and renewed. Something I want to learn to not do, but be in better. In and through Jesus.