leaving (instead of living) the lie

Therefore hear the word of the Lord, you scoffers
who rule this people in Jerusalem.
You boast, “We have entered into a covenant with death,
with the realm of the dead we have made an agreement.
When an overwhelming scourge sweeps by,
it cannot touch us,
for we have made a lie our refuge
and falsehood our hiding place.”

So this is what the Sovereign Lord says:

“See, I lay a stone in Zion, a tested stone,
a precious cornerstone for a sure foundation;
the one who relies on it
will never be stricken with panic.
I will make justice the measuring line
and righteousness the plumb line;
hail will sweep away your refuge, the lie,
and water will overflow your hiding place.
Your covenant with death will be annulled;
your agreement with the realm of the dead will not stand.
When the overwhelming scourge sweeps by,
you will be beaten down by it.
As often as it comes it will carry you away;
morning after morning, by day and by night,
it will sweep through.”

Isaiah 28:14-19

I think it’s far more common than we imagine, just how we live in lies. And I’m thinking of Christians, too. Specifically I’m thinking of myself, included. Part of what got me thinking this way were two posts quoting Dallas Willard who says it quite eloquently in the details spelled out in Scripture (here and here).

We live lies in a multitude of ways. Essentially living in the truth is “truth in Jesus” and an important aspect of that is living in the Father’s care, so that we’re free to seek his kingdom and righteousness, not encumbered with any of the cares common to humanity, or part of our culture. That is so much more easier said than done.

When one is weighed down, maybe nearly stricken with panic, that’s a sure sign one is not living in the Father’s provision, or as it’s been called, his providential care. We’re failing to trust in God, at least not to the extent needed. We need to take our hands off so to speak, and through prayer, find our way into that peace that frees us up to seek first God’s kingdom and righteousness.

Patterns in our lives will have to be broken, and that can be hard. It will require effort by us, but an effort essentially to let go, and let God take over. We need to find his peace. Part of this is not just to be freed up to put first things first, but with the prior commitment to that.

As the text above tells us, life simply doesn’t work well when we make a lie our refuge. And God won’t let it work well for those who name his name, who profess faith in him.

This is something we need to strive to enter and remain, come what may. God has us, as we seek first of all to live in his care and love and will. Part and parcel of being followers of Jesus in and through him.

 

wisdom in the real world

One of the major themes of Scripture is wisdom. We have wisdom books: Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Job, even Song of Songs. And some of the Psalms. I would like to include James from the New Testament, and you can find snippets of wisdom everywhere throughout Scripture.

What marks out Biblical wisdom is “the fear of God” which is foundational to it. But also it’s plain to see that the wisdom talked about in Scripture is for us as we really are, for life as it really is, not some idealized version.

I think this is important, because it might be easy for us to give up on the pursuit of wisdom, or think we really haven’t received it from God, because we’re so aware of our flaws. But the wisdom given is for flawed people, yes, to help us walk in the way of God, and not in our own way. But also to help us do better, both unlearn and learn, and continue, not only in the way of wisdom, but as life-long seekers of it.

We’re told that Christ is our wisdom. Ultimately we find God’s wisdom in him, and actually to understand all the rest is to see it in light of him. This is from Scripture, God’s written word, and the Spirit. So that means we don’t leave any of the Scripture witness behind. And we especially mark all that is pointed and helpful for us on our journey. As we continue on in the way of wisdom. In and through Jesus.

what we’re responsible for

…do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

Matthew 6:34

So often we can either get caught up in the past or the future. Downcast because of past mistakes and sins. Apprehensive because of possible future consequences or fear of the unknown.

That is part of the ploy of the enemy (spiritual, of course). But what we’re called to do is what Jesus tells us here (click reference for context). We’re not to worry about tomorrow, and we’re not to be frozen or even defined by past mistakes. What we’re responsible for is the present, right now.

We repent over past sins, and try to learn from past mistakes so that we can do better, gathering wisdom from Scripture. Of course we can’t undo the past, as much as we would like. But hopefully it can serve as a help for us, so that we can help others. Nor do we wring our hands in apprehension over the future. Jesus’s words address that directly in Matthew 6 (click link above). Our Father knows all we need, and will take care of our needs as we trust in him, and seek first his righteousness and kingdom in our lives, and in life in general.

It is so vitally important to have hope for today, right now. Not to be down because of the past, or be worrying about the future. It’s the present we’re responsible for. We don’t want to let the devil get us down and out because of what is out of our control.

It’s the present in which we live, where God meets us, and helps us to receive from him so that we in turn might give to others. In and through Jesus.

the mistake of relevancy

Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world. If it were, my servants would fight to prevent my arrest by the Jewish leaders. But now my kingdom is from another place.”

“You are a king, then!” said Pilate.

Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. In fact, the reason I was born and came into the world is to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.”

“What is truth?” retorted Pilate.

John 18:36-38a

To want to be relevant is not necessarily a mistake at all. Paul sought to be all things to all people that by all possible means he might win as many as possible to Christ through the gospel (1 Corinthians 9). But often it is. The problem is one of truth. We want to reach people where they’re at, but never at the expense of truth.

Jesus made no sense to Pilate. Yes he was a king, but not in a way that mattered to Pilate. The governor was accountable to Rome, and that’s what mattered to him. Whatever “truth” might be, that was irrelevant to Pilate.

Truth telling, and more precisely, testifying to the truth was what Jesus was all about. We read in the same book that Jesus called himself “the truth”, along with “the way and the life” (John 14:6). So Jesus’s testimony necessarily pointed people to himself.

That doesn’t seem relevant to the world at large. What goes on in Washington and elsewhere matters, and little else. But if Jesus were here today, he would make the same appeal. Yes, we have to live in the world, in nations under governments, and for many, that’s where all truth and justice are found. And the power to implement such. Jesus lived in Roman occupied territory, but he did not base his life on such. It was all about his identity, who he was and what he had come to do.

What about us today? As Christians, where do we find truth? What do we think is relevant? Or is any of this much of a concern to us? Do we simply fall into line with the status quo, with what others, maybe even other Christians are doing and thinking?

We need to find for ourselves what we can then offer to others, hopefully by our example in searching and the change that brings. Yes, truth is something we search out and find, find and search out. That never ends.

Jesus is a king, and his kingdom is not from this world, but is indeed for living in the world. But not attune to the world. It would never become a part of the Roman empire, so that it would be irrelevant to them. Though later, the Roman Empire would become “Christian” simply as a way of uniting the empire, since Christianity was so widespread. In many ways not unlike what people mean when they call the United States a Christian nation. But Jesus’s word goes on. And it’s not about was is relevant to how we’re getting on with life, or what any nation is doing. But in terms of what is truly and in the end eternally relevant for this life and the next.

So let’s be in our Bibles, in prayer, in church, regardless of how irrelevant that oftentimes might seem. And stay in that. Finding the truth in Jesus, down to earth, even while not of this world and its ways. In and through him.

seeking knowledge and truth

The story of the Magi is marvelous for this day in a number of ways. We live in a day in which skepticism of the Christian message at least in the western world abounds. This is called a post-Christian culture for good reason. Science and in fact life itself is thought to negate the Christian message and the proclamation of Jesus.

Enter the story of the Magi who indeed come from a different culture, apart from the covenant God made with Israel for the benefit of all humankind. But in part due to that revelation, and to God’s working in their own lives, they had a sense that there was something beyond their senses and learning, yet related to their learning, I’m imagining, which they needed to seek.

The star which they became aware of may have been some unusual heavenly occurrence such as a comet. How this plays out, even in some way leading them to the Christ child, we do not know. Maybe something natural but unusual. Or something we would call supernatural. But their inner witness comported with the outer witness, and they brought gifts fit for a king. Probably not knowing much about this kingship at this point. We see that they did not necessarily have a strong grasp if any on the Hebrew scriptures from the account in Matthew.

But they kept going. And they were rewarded for their perseverance. God’s light of revelation for the Gentiles had indeed dawned.

In this day and age we do well to be seekers of knowledge and truth. The knowledge part is well accepted in academia. It’s the truth part that gets seekers of it into trouble with that establishment. There is an inherent, inbred skepticism against imagining any truth, or any truth other than what science might provide. But while the “new atheists” have a popular following, yet by and large humanity still retains some sense of the divine.

Seeking carries with it the sense of humility. Acknowledging a lack in knowledge. And the seeking of the Magi carries with it an openness not only to knowledge, but also to truth. Their practice probably emphasized the knowledge part, indeed astrology while linked to deities had within it much of the elements of scientific work today, from what I understand of it. We probably can only surmise what their practice involved.

Science and faith is a hot button issue today. But unnecessarily so if one retains an openness not only to knowledge itself, but to truth. Of course the new atheists while denying truth talk as if they speak the truth. Science as practiced now has nothing to do with truth and should not pretend otherwise, and has everything to do with knowledge. But as the Magi long ago discovered, there is something more to life than the gathering of knowledge. And more than the best of what humankind has gathered as the meaning of it all. Meaning is found in a person. The truth is found in Jesus. A truth not just to be known in one’s head, but for all of life. A truth to be lived in. For all the world.