psalming on July 4 (from Scot McKnight)

Of course, neither our President nor any nation’s leader is the same as the Davidic king envisioned here, but the Davidic king can be seen as a template of kingship — with due adjustments for our world, and with all respect to our Canadians who have some of their official statements embedded in this Psalm.

Perhaps today you could begin by praying for our President.

From BCP

For the peace of the world, for the welfare of the Holy Church
of God, and for the unity of all peoples, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

For our President, for the leaders of the nations, and for all in
authority, let us pray to the Lord.
Lord, have mercy.

Psalm 72

Endow the king with your justice, O God,
the royal son with your righteousness.
May he judge your people in righteousness,
your afflicted ones with justice.

May the mountains bring prosperity to the people,
the hills the fruit of righteousness.
May he defend the afflicted among the people
and save the children of the needy;
may he crush the oppressor.
May he endure as long as the sun,
as long as the moon, through all generations.
May he be like rain falling on a mown field,
like showers watering the earth.
In his days may the righteous flourish
and prosperity abound till the moon is no more.

May he rule from sea to sea
and from the River to the ends of the earth.
May the desert tribes bow before him
and his enemies lick the dust.
May the kings of Tarshish and of distant shores
bring tribute to him.
May the kings of Sheba and Seba
present him gifts.
May all kings bow down to him
and all nations serve him.

For he will deliver the needy who cry out,
the afflicted who have no one to help.
He will take pity on the weak and the needy
and save the needy from death.
He will rescue them from oppression and violence,
for precious is their blood in his sight.

Long may he live!
May gold from Sheba be given him.
May people ever pray for him
and bless him all day long.
May grain abound throughout the land;
on the tops of the hills may it sway.
May the crops flourish like Lebanon
and thrive like the grass of the field.
May his name endure forever;
may it continue as long as the sun.

Then all nations will be blessed through him,
and they will call him blessed.

Praise be to the LORD God, the God of Israel,
who alone does marvelous deeds.
Praise be to his glorious name forever;
may the whole earth be filled with his glory.
Amen and Amen.

Source: Scot McKnight: Jesus Creed

the seeming uneven hand of God

There is no way you can live very long and thoughtfully, and not find the unevenness of life perplexing, even troubling. Why does life happen the way it does? In terms of circumstances, as well as in one’s lot. There are the crack cocaine babies, those born in places that have never heard the gospel, others having to flee their homes in war zones, not to mention atrocities from which people can never fully recover. That’s only the beginning of what we could say. I’m sure the list could go on and on.

Although we can’t say God caused these things—of course some would question whether God caused anything—the Hebrew Bible, First Testament attributes to God everything, since nothing can happen outside of his will. God could stop or prevent anything from happening. We could live in a different world. Everything would make sense to us in that world. No one would tell lies and mislead people. No one would harm people for their own self-interest, or who knows what for?

I have experienced plenty of blessing in my life, but like everyone else, I live under the curse (Genesis 3). The world is far from an agreeable place to live if one is going to take out the fairness, justice card. This is much more the case for some people other than myself, people whose progeny have suffered injustice over generations, and who still do to this day. And the syndrome that comes with that; there are some things most people never gets over at least in the way of shaping them, sometimes actually in good ways.

Turning to scripture can help us here. I think particularly of the story of Job. It is a great help in looking straight in the face the unevenness of the world, and the seeming unevenness of God. Life is messy at best, and traumatic or even catastrophic at worst.

This is where faith comes in. Do I believe in God, even in a good God in spite of the fallout of life? Do I hold on to that belief for dear life, in spite of my numbness, and even anger, in spite of unresolved questions and the reality which flies in the face of easy answers, and wooden empty platitudes? Yes, in the midst of it all, someone can say Romans 8:28 instead of simply being present with us and praying. A handy out for them, it would seem, even if they are completely sincere and only want to help.

But looking at life as it is, we do need to get back to the bedrock of our faith. We need to look both at the details of scripture, and to the gospel, the good news in Jesus. God’s ultimate answer is Jesus, and the cross. How everything shakes out in the end is with reference to that, and how God is at work in the present, as well. We do well to lay hold of the promises of God, like in Proverbs 3:5-6 with that in mind. And as Job would remind us, mystery is a major player, as well. Who can understand what only God can fully understand, if the God of the Bible exists?

Life is uneven now, but there is God in Jesus. We need to stop there, no matter what. That is where we need to take the broken, shattered pieces of our lives, our own brokenness, indeed, ourselves. And in prayer, others, as well.

We look toward an end when all will be grace, flourishing, shalom. When the end will make good sense, even if we never do understand fully what preceded that. All of this always in and through Jesus.

always pray

Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. He said: “In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought. And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.’

“For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?”

Luke 18

Jesus seems to present two alternatives in this parable told to his disciples. We either pray or we give up, one or the other. And the plea here is for justice, for what is right, and I would add to that, what is good. Shalom is the transliterated Hebrew word for peace which includes prosperity and flourishing, along with the absence of conflict. Certainly justice and righteousness are at the heart of that.

The need to always pray implies that there will always be a need in this present life for justice, in this context in terms of getting one’s rights, and usually in scripture always inclusive of others, especially those who are often on the short end of that, in scripture that being orphans, widows, and refugees (or strangers/aliens).

And so our call is to pray, and not give up, not lose heart (NRSV). And Jesus clearly suggests that to pray is to have faith, and to not pray is to be lacking in it, to have little or no faith at all. And along with that is an implied contrast. The unjust judge reluctantly provides justice in the story, actually out of self-interest. Since that is the case, the question is asked, how much more will God provide the same to his people, who continue to pray to him? But Jesus then suggests that even though this is the case, it is not certain that even God’s people will pray at least as they ought to.

This helps me see both the importance, as well as the difficulty in continuing in this kind of prayer. In this world one can look only to God for a final resolution to everything. And even for the grace to carry on when one is shortchanged in this life. That is the challenge for me: to pray at all, and to keep praying. It is easy either to drift along thinking all is well enough and under control, or to be overwhelmed with problems to the point in which one is tempted to give up. Instead God wants us to pray, and to continue in prayer. A true test of our faith. In and through Jesus.

 

 

the promise of the restoration of the years the locusts have eaten

“I will repay you for the years the locusts have eaten—
    the great locust and the young locust,
    the other locusts and the locust swarm[f]
my great army that I sent among you.
You will have plenty to eat, until you are full,
    and you will praise the name of the Lord your God,
    who has worked wonders for you;
never again will my people be shamed.
Then you will know that I am in Israel,
    that I am the Lord your God,
    and that there is no other;
never again will my people be shamed.

Joel 2:25-27

One needs to read the entire (short) book of Joel to really appreciate what is said here (above link includes entire book). God’s judgment had been on his people, there was a call to repent, and then God is moved to make this promise. After that there is the well known promise Peter echoed on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2) of God’s outpouring of the Spirit. And then the final judgment to come when a good God roots out evil.

The promise of restoration and somehow being paid back for all that has been lost due to sin is certainly great. It is given not to an individual, but to the people of God as a whole. It certainly touches individual lives, but is corporate. We have to see that somehow we are part of the sin of our group, but upon repentance how we are part of God’s blessing given to his people, as well. We can be complicit in the sins of others, by ignoring or somehow even excusing it. Or we might participate to some extent in it ourselves perhaps without even realizing it.

We are in this together, and even the remnant which may have done better ends up suffering due to the unfaithfulness of the people. But I think we have to be careful lest we kid ourselves and think we are so far removed from the sin of our people. For most of us that probably won’t be a problem; we know all too well our sin, what we have done, or perhaps even what we’re doing. Even the faithful Daniel included himself in his petition to God of repentance in anticipation of Israel’s restoration to the promised land in keeping with Jeremiah’s prophecy (Daniel 9).

And then the promise. Overwhelming to be sure, but God wants his people, and really all of humankind to flourish. God is the God of blessing. Judgment is God’s “strange work,” but God’s goal and the end is always about blessing. And God blesses his people that they might be a blessing. Israel was to be a light to the nations, that being ultimately fulfilled by and now in Jesus himself.

And so even if it’s the eleventh hour for us, we need to take full stock, and in spite of everything find God’s blessing with his people in and through Jesus. To ask God to search us and know us so that come what may, together we might be led in the way everlasting.

 

someday this will all be over

Over, and done. Yes, someday this will all be over. “This too, shall pass.” And out of the mass and mess of it all will arise the grace of God in Jesus in the new world, fundamentally not different from this world in terms of creation, but good in every sense of that word in the new creation.

Everywhere I turn there are grave concerns. But I’m not, neither are any of us, or all of us together, God. It is God to whom we must commit everything, including our loved ones and ourselves. God alone can and will take care of it.

In the meantime there is a significant part of us which looks forward to the end of all things as they are now. All the strife, as well as the natural disasters in this world. Yes, in the midst of much good to be sure. All pointers to the great good to come in the grace and kingdom of God in King Jesus.

So now we want to do the best we can, completely because of God’s grace in Jesus; yes, we must live in that grace through faith in Jesus: in his life, teaching, death, resurrection and ascension to ultimate power and authority, with the promise of his return. We know that all of this, all of the trouble, and real concerns will someday end, and be a thing of the past, even forgotten. But we fight through now, out of love, the love of God in Jesus, in love for others: our loved ones, others in Jesus, all people, even our enemies. We want to embrace the way of the cross, the way of Jesus. And go on.

The end is not that far away. Come, Lord Jesus. Amen.

the gospel breaks the color barrier

There is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

Galatians 3

Maybe my biggest disappointment with the church as I’ve seen it for the most part, with notable exceptions, is just how monochrome, or segregated most churches are on any given Sunday. It is understandable, yet sad at the same time, in my view. God’s grace covers us, and there’s a history behind it. And it’s not like churches who are white or black want to be segregated. There are different cultures involved, and people are at home in different places.

But the gospel is meant to bring together those who likely would never do so apart from it. What is true concerning Jews and Gentiles being reconciled to God as one body (Ephesians 2:11-22) is also true of all peoples, bringing for example Palestinians and Jews together through the cross, through Jesus’s death, along with blacks and whites, Protestants and Catholics, everyone. The reconciliation to God extends no less to each other through the good news in Jesus, and the Spirit who makes us one in him.

As a witness to the gospel, and the saving power it brings, we need to show the world how we can work through the barriers, whatever they may be. How our unity in God through Jesus by the Spirit in the love of God in Jesus supercedes all distinctions, breaks down all animosities and hostilities, through Christ’s death, and our repentance and faith, and brings the promised healing and shalom. This new world is now present through Christ in his body the church. As a witness to the world, and as part of the salvation we ourselves need, in and through Jesus.

the primary problem with the flag draped over the cross

Yesterday, Christianity Today published an excellent critique by Andy Crouch of Donald Trump and his run for the presidency, aimed at challenging evangelicals who still support Trump, not leaving out some criticism of Hillary Clinton’s run. It is well worth the read. And Scot McKnight wrote an equally compelling piece from an Anabaptist, and certainly more importantly, a biblical perspective, questioning the allegiance of both the Christian right and the Christian left to an American political Christian position, as if America itself could, and therefore ought to be a Christian nation. Recently Jeff Manion at Ada Bible Church in his series on the book of Colossians challenged the idol that we can make of America, not questioning a proper patriotism Christians might adopt, but the kind which would see the flag draped over a cross.

The basic problem is that the gospel is not seen as a good news which is about a kingdom come in Jesus which involves all of life, but rather simply about one’s personal salvation. It is certainly that, but much more. It is about all of life, including the political sphere, a politic in and of itself in the grace and kingdom in Jesus. One enters into this through the good news of Christ by faith, and into a common life which is a precursor of the life on earth to come, when Jesus returns. It is political in that everything matters in the life of the church. The rich help the poor, while everyone is held accountable to live well, and grow in their lives together, as followers of Jesus, and no less than Christ’s body on earth. (Jesus Christ, of course; I try to use the terms in the way scripture places them.)

Of course the church can be a blessing to the state, but not by the politics of the state, except where the state wants to include the work of the church. That is where sooner or later it can be not only tricky, but downright deceptive, as the church looks to the state to provide what only the church through Jesus can provide.

Like most everything in life, this is more complicated than that, but that basic premise must never be left behind. It isn’t that what the state does, or fails to do matters. For example, I believe it shouldn’t even be an issue that there is some kind of universal health care provided through the state. Many people are not part of the church, not Christian, and God will judge nations on how they treat each other, especially the poor, oppressed and helpless. The church ought to be a model of what the state should do. Of course if the state provides services for citizens, than the church proceeds accordingly. But the point here is that the politics of the state is important. Yet the church is never to get entangled in such a way that they have an unhealthy and even idolatrous relationship with the state, seeing it as the source of blessing, rather than looking to God through Christ. The church must be careful never to get into a union with the state, and see its existence depending on the state. We know that this is simply not the case. The reality of the church is in the resurrection of Jesus and through the Spirit. The church will go on come what may. And the shalom/justice and peace, though present in some respects within the church through Jesus will not take root and flourish on earth until Jesus returns and reigns.

And so, in a kind of rambling here, I have shared a bit of what I understand to be the problem with the American flag draped over the cross, the union of church and state. Yes, American claims the separation of church and state, and in some ways we experience that through the religious freedom here. But all too often we are taken right back up into an allegiance and union in our thinking and practice which belongs to Jesus alone, and to God’s grace and kingdom present even now, in and through Jesus.

See also in this connection an important, helpful book by Allan R. Bevere: The Politics of Witness: The Character of the Church in the World.