gaining new strength

Why do you complain, Jacob?
Why do you say, Israel,
“My way is hidden from the Lord;
my cause is disregarded by my God”?
Do you not know?
Have you not heard?
The Lord is the everlasting God,
the Creator of the ends of the earth.
He will not grow tired or weary,
and his understanding no one can fathom.
He gives strength to the weary
and increases the power of the weak.
Even youths grow tired and weary,
and young men stumble and fall;
but those who hope in the Lord
will renew their strength.
They will soar on wings like eagles;
they will run and not grow weary,
they will walk and not be faint.

Isaiah 40:27-31

There are times when we’ve simply had enough. When our strength has reached the end, and there’s nothing left. Well, we need to get our rest, for sure. But as God’s people we need to find strength in God.

We’re called here in Isaiah to wait for, hope in, or trust in God. That as we hope in him, we’ll find our strength. Strength for the day to finish our tasks. To do God’s will by God’s grace and enabling.

When we’re at a loss with no strength, that’s the opportune time to wait on the Lord to give us the strength needed. God will give that to us as we hope in him as Isaiah tells us clearly here. In and through Jesus.

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an encouraging promise

The lions may grow weak and hungry,
    but those who seek the Lord lack no good thing.

Psalm 34:10

When we are sometimes literally hungry, but I have to think of the times I may be down and discouraged, such a text from God’s word can be a great help. This was true just the other day for me.

The promise is for those who seek the Lord. And what’s promised is certainly all that is needed. To not lack any good thing.

Ultimately we know that will be fulfilled in the life to come through the resurrection in Jesus, when heaven and earth become one at his return, and God makes all things new. But in some measure in some way, this is entirely true for this life, as well. We lack no good thing to not only survive, but flourish in this life. It is in the way of the Lord, the way of Jesus for us. So that we’re not talking about luxuries, and living it up. Even though at times we might experience some of that. And God has given us richly, all things to enjoy (1 Timothy 6). But we’re talking about the true riches, which just might include a contentedness to do without, in a happiness over what one has, instead of wanting what one has not.

And so this is a word of encouragement to me in the midst of difficulty and discouragement. To simply seek God, and be given all that I need to overcome and be at peace, in and through Jesus.

God’s strength for our days

…and your strength will equal your days.

Deuteronomy 33:25

This was part of Moses’s blessing to Asher. Precisely how to translate and understand this might be a little in the air. It at least seems to give the sense of God-given strength as needed. I still like the rendering of the NIV, though most of the other renderings, except for the NLT don’t deviate in the basic meaning. Either way, God promises strength or protection as needed.

All of God’s promises to his people are “yes and amen in Christ” (2 Corinthians). And we can be assured that God will give us needed strength and help for the tasks given to us. It may seem difficult at times, perhaps even unsurmountable. But God will give all that we need when we need it. A blessing not just to individuals, but to an entire tribe, so that we’re together with others in this. “As our days are, so shall our strength be.” In and through Jesus. Amen.

bracing grace

We put no stumbling block in anyone’s path, so that our ministry will not be discredited. Rather, as servants of God we commend ourselves in every way: in great endurance; in troubles, hardships and distresses; in beatings, imprisonments and riots; in hard work, sleepless nights and hunger; in purity, understanding, patience and kindness; in the Holy Spirit and in sincere love; in truthful speech and in the power of God;with weapons of righteousness in the right hand and in the left; through glory and dishonor, bad report and good report; genuine, yet regarded as impostors; known, yet regarded as unknown; dying, and yet we live on; beaten, and yet not killed; sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; poor, yet making many rich; having nothing, and yet possessing everything.

We have spoken freely to you, Corinthians, and opened wide our hearts to you. We are not withholding our affection from you, but you are withholding yours from us. As a fair exchange—I speak as to my children—open wide your hearts also.

2 Corinthians 6 (see the entire book)

When God’s grace is normally spoken of, it seems like it’s primarily about forgiveness and the new life we receive in Christ. And that’s certainly true and foundational to our faith. But grace is multifaceted in scripture. Grace includes as well the wherewithal, the ability to get up after one has been knocked down, maybe nearly knocked out.

I’ve certainly experienced that myself, probably a good many times. It’s when you think and feel that all is lost, or you’ve crossed a line of no return, and usually tied to some fear. However you might be impacted, God’s grace to us in Christ will eventually help us get back on our feet again and stand firm, even while remembering the occasion along with the reasons for bringing us down. And for the most part, even to forget such times.

God’s grace to God’s children helps us live responsibly and like God’s children. And as such, more and more in the maturity of Christ. Something I’ve noticed, something certainly needed. In and through Jesus.

 

God’s promise of strength for the day

and your strength will equal your days.

Deuteronomy 33:25

In Moses’s final blessing for Israel before he died, these words are noteworthy in his specific blessing for the tribe Asher. And we are told that all of the promises of God are yes and amen for us in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20). In other words we can somehow lay claim to them, either directly or indirectly. The original promise was given to a people, but surely individuals are included in that blessing.

In my case, I’m facing a new work schedule which for me so far has been challenging due to its longevity, and the short window of time I have in between work days during that time frame of the week. Necessary sleep at any age, but perhaps especially at my age is important. We have to take care of ourselves. We are physical beings, as well as spiritual. It is one thing to have a sleep deprived night for a good reason, such as an emergency, but even then some recovery is called for. But when we do this night after night, young or old, we’re setting ourselves up for either poor health, or an accident, perhaps both.

I haven’t slept enough in my life, and I’ve probably drank more than my share of coffee. But I’m realizing, especially after I talked with one of my sisters who struggles with her sleep as well, that I really have to make getting adequate sleep a priority the rest of my life. Which for me at this time means trying to get 6 or more hours of sleep, and when I can, more.

So God’s promise here is not an excuse for us to fail to take care of ourselves. The promise here is not only physical, but spiritual, and perhaps primarily so. Physical and spiritual were essentially one in the Hebrew way of thinking, the former derived from the latter, as we see clearly in the strange story of Samson.

For us in Jesus, we find the Lord’s strength in our weakness, to be sure. And that might include not getting enough sleep now and then. But we do our best to be good stewards of the life God has given us, which includes taking care of our bodies. And we have God’s promise that our strength will equal the days God gives us, a part of his blessing to us that we might be a blessing, in and through Jesus.

the strongman is weak

This will be my third visit to you. “Every matter must be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses.” I already gave you a warning when I was with you the second time. I now repeat it while absent: On my return I will not spare those who sinned earlier or any of the others, since you are demanding proof that Christ is speaking through me. He is not weak in dealing with you, but is powerful among you. For to be sure, he was crucified in weakness, yet he lives by God’s power. Likewise, we are weak in him, yet by God’s power we will live with him in our dealing with you.

2 Corinthians 13

This could end up being one of those few posts I delete for whatever reason. But I want to say upfront that something of the very plague of thinking “might makes right” is endemic in our culture, as it was in  Paul’s day. It was a lot about a superior wisdom then to which the cross was pure folly. But make no mistake about it, to the Romans strength and power was also a first order value, the very breath of their existence, and in their minds at least helping them establish their value in the world. And ironically, one could make the case that this Roman grip in its strength, and extensiveness helped immensely in the spread of the gospel.

Give me a person who is weak in Jesus, depending on him, and I’ll see a person whose strength is ultimately in God. Give me a person who is strong in themselves, and depends on no one, and I’ll see a person whose strength is destined to fail, since it’s only in themselves. I realize life can be more complicated than this. We have no further to look than Proverbs to realize that, along with the rest of the Bible, and then some reflection on life itself.

But ultimately, when you get right down to the heart of existence, you have to find your strength in God, and you do that, paradoxically through finding it in the weakness of the crucified Jesus, in whom we both die and live, in resurrection power and life. In the strength which is God’s in Jesus given to us by the Spirit for each other and the world.

focused praying

The earnest prayer of a righteous person has great power and produces wonderful results.

James 5:16b; NLT

Exactly how to translate this verse is up for grabs. I like the point that the NLT rendering, along with other translations (see link, and other translations on Bible Gateway) makes. Real prayer is focused, whereas simply praying a prayer is not necessarily so, akin to when Isaiah (quoted by the Lord) says that people can praise God with their lips, while their hearts are far from him.

Whatever the correct way to translate this passage (and that seems up for grabs, or interpretation, but might be a good further study), I think the idea of earnestness or fervency, wholeheartedness in praying, is certainly apt and commendable. We are so good at doing religious things half heartedly, going through the motions. But faith, especially in difficult matters, but really in anything in this life wants to take hold of God, like Jacob of old, who wrestled with the angel of God (Genesis 32).

It’s not like in all of our weakness, we shouldn’t feebly utter a prayer. We should; we should pray all kinds of prayers. I think in part so that we make sure we’re not merely going through the motions, it is good to give at least some of our prayers the strong expression they deserve, sort of like making our words bold in print. It seems like in our human weakness, this helps me to be focused, and cut through my own denseness, or ineptitude, and through the spiritual resistance of the devil, and hopefully pray in the Spirit.

Prayer requires effort, and is part of the fight of faith we are in for the good of others, was well as for our own good in this life. In and through Jesus.