turning our attention to that which will last

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.

Philippians 4:8

Discernment is the call of the day. I suppose people will pay attention to different things, depending on what they consider valuable and good. We have to go back to God’s revelation in Jesus, found in Scripture. We need the Holy Spirit to guide us, and faithful leaders and teachers in the church committed to such.

There’s much that clamors for our attention. We need to be careful what we give our attention to both in terms of substance and time. Some things may be fine here and there, but not incessantly. While other things we may need to turn away from, or avoid all together.

As we practice this, we will more and more be able to see through that which is hollow, not meeting these standards. We need to humbly push toward what is the best and leave the rest behind. Even as we seek to help those caught in the lesser things. In and through Jesus.

 

 

 

the best kind of teaching

There are gifted teachers who sometimes help us see things we’ve never seen before. Two of them who have influenced me in my lifetime are N. T. Wright and Scot McKnight.  Both have helped many. Interestingly, McKnight, who has been a professor for many years (as well as a scholar and writer) teaches in a way to challenge others to have to grapple with what he’s saying, and put it together for themselves. He doesn’t necessarily put everything together, but enough so that the listener can figure it out for themselves. He wants interactivity, might be the bottom line. I really hesitate to speak for someone else, but I think that’s part of what’s going on. McKnight’s books do present a coherent whole. But part of the best kind of teaching is to get the listener to work through it themselves, not simply give ready made answers, so that the listener just passively receives that. The goal is to make learners or disciples who in our way of putting it, will learn to think critically, to think for themselves, but at the same time know how along with others to begin to follow Christ, to be the church. Of course the anointing of the Spirit is present in Jesus to teach us as well (1 John 2) as we wrestle through what is being taught.

We have been taking our grandchildren to Ada Bible Church, and I’ve been pleasantly surprised just how much I have liked it, usually wanting to avoid mega churches. Their ministry to children, and their simple straightforward teaching of scripture, with an emphasis on application is most helpful. And what I think it gets the listener to do is learn to engage with the text in the same way as it’s being taught. Another example of the best kind of teaching.

The first from McKnight is more challenging, and especially important for an academic setting. But I’m sure McKnight engages in something of the same that Ada Bible Church does. It’s not like he doesn’t give answers, but it’s more like he’s drawing out students to work through it for themselves, so that they might not only find such answers, but come up with something fresh themselves. Ada Bible Church’s task as a church is in part to feed and take care of the Lord’s sheep. And a big part of that is to help us learn to help ourselves, of course while under and following the Good Shepherd.

Where I work, Our Daily Bread Ministries, I believe does something of the same in its worldwide ministry, which I have come to appreciate more and more.

All of this to help us come to faith, and grow up together toward full maturity in Christ.

 

dependency on teachers

Now the Berean Jews were of more noble character than those in Thessalonica, for they received the message with great eagerness and examined the Scriptures every day to see if what Paul said was true. As a result, many of them believed, as did also a number of prominent Greek women and many Greek men.

Acts 17:11-12

As for you, the anointing you received from him remains in you, and you do not need anyone to teach you. But as his anointing teaches you about all things and as that anointing is real, not counterfeit—just as it has taught you, remain in him.

1 John 2:27

As it is well said, it’s better to teach a person how to fish than make them dependent on someone who fishes for them. The best teachers in the church are those who help the listeners grow up into maturity in the faith through the gospel, and be not only students of the word, but lovers of God and people. Of course that love rooted in the gospel which is the expression of God’s love to us and to the world in and through Jesus.

Poor teaching and teachers make people dependent on them and their books. The older I get, the less I take notes. I used to be a big note taker. At the same time though, the older I get, the more I appreciate teachers who make one think, and challenge their faith in ways which build us up toward being more like Jesus, and knowing God better. In the ways of faith and love.

The passages quoted above tell us to keep searching the scriptures, and that means all of them, the Old Testament as well. And to trust the Holy Spirit to help us right now, today, and in the long haul as well.

We need understanding for life, which scripture is meant to give us. Life in community in Jesus, and for others for whom Jesus died, which means everyone.

But again Jesus makes himself and God’s good news and will known by his Spirit, using teachers, but not dependent on any one of them.