for this July 4th

For the director of music. A psalm of David.

May the Lord answer you when you are in distress;
may the name of the God of Jacob protect you.
May he send you help from the sanctuary
and grant you support from Zion.
May he remember all your sacrifices
and accept your burnt offerings.
May he give you the desire of your heart
and make all your plans succeed.
May we shout for joy over your victory
and lift up our banners in the name of our God.

May the Lord grant all your requests.

Now this I know:
The Lord gives victory to his anointed.
He answers him from his heavenly sanctuary
with the victorious power of his right hand.
Some trust in chariots and some in horses,
but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.
They are brought to their knees and fall,
but we rise up and stand firm.
Lord, give victory to the king!
Answer us when we call!

Psalm 20

Here in the United States today we celebrate Independence Day when officially our nation began. What this nation stands for in principle is good, even though we’ve never lived up to it. Such is the human enterprise. We can’t reach that goal entirely apart from God’s grace and enabling in Christ. And that’s really at the heart of the fulfillment of the psalm quoted above. Only when Jesus returns when heaven and earth become one will that be fully realized.

But in the meantime, the United States should aspire in humility before God to occupy its own space for the good of all humankind. Realizing that it’s not in its own might or weaponry that it will succeed. But only by God’s mercy. As we know victory resides only in the King of kings, and Lord of lords, Jesus. And the United States should always be ready to acknowledge wrongs done, and try to make them right and do better.

This should temper our expectations, and help form our prayers, even as we thank God today for the good of the United States.

Advertisements

God’s promise of anxiety-overcoming peace

Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Philippians 4:6-7

Like so many things in the Christian life, the directive here is radical and goes beyond our understanding of things, or what we might do left to ourselves. Off and on I’ve struggled with anxiety. Oftentimes I’ve more or less given up, and just learned to live with it.

It could be translated that we’re not to worry or be anxious, either one. There are few things more debilitating than anxiety. It seems to eat at the core of our being, and take the heart out of life, so that what we do is a mechanical grind. When we’re anxious, we’re failing to trust and rest in God’s provision for us in Christ.

This Scripture probably is helping us both to avoid anxiety or worry, or know how to deal with it when it strikes us. We’re told in every situation what to do. The same thing: with thanksgiving, pray. Prayer, petition, and thanksgiving. Specific requests to God with thanksgiving.

I know that in the past I’ve done this even in a poor way, and found the promise to be true. It’s an act of faith. And God does come through.

Sometimes it can be particularly difficult. I’ve gone through days into weeks in the past, basically not realizing this peace, surely because I failed to follow this directive. Likely a part of the spiritual warfare all believers experience (Ephesians 6:10-20). The enemy knows that anxiety is one way to trip us humans and strip us of God’s peace. And they know our weak, vulnerable places, as well.

The answer in the passage quoted above is simple. We’re to do it. God will help us through whatever we’re facing. But he wants to do so while we have his peace. The peace of God which goes beyond any understanding we have. That is our call and privilege in and through Jesus.

for Memorial Day

We are thankful for all who put themselves in harm’s way for the good of others, and really for the good of all. Of course we recognize and acknowledge the limitations of any nation state of this world, and regret that all too often what is decided is the best for national interests does not necessarily have the best for all in mind, and actually often ends up detrimental to the national interest it professes to protect.

At the same time, even given the inevitable limitations of the state, we are thankful for all those who serve in the military and police for the good and protection of others, and especially for those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice in doing so. We want to remember them on this day.

May God give the governmental leaders of this world the wisdom to look to him, to be reticent, even wary of violence except as a last resort. A deep respect for the life of all, beginning with those under their command. And all of those serving a heart to be present for the welfare of their own nation. As prayers are offered that all conflict will end once and for all in the petition, “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.”

a thankful life

always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Ephesians 5:20

To really grasp well the impact of Paul’s words, and really God’s word here, we need to look at the backdrop, or the context (click link to see). Paul is writing especially to Gentiles in a typically pagan, godless setting. Encouraging them out of the love God has for them as his dear children, to live lives of love and holiness. In the course of that, Paul also mentions how thanksgiving is proper rather than the kind of talk they were accustomed to. I think part of the point is that God is now in their thoughts, that they are finding the good of life and thanking God as the giver. In Romans 1 Paul notes that when humankind abandons God, they also become unthankful, not thanking God (Romans 1:21). So ingratitude is something that should be seen as a sin. At the very least, we should never excuse it.

The call to thanksgiving above is in the context of a Spirit-filled life. Instead of living inebriated with alcohol or full of the spirits of this world, we’re to be filled with the Holy Spirit. And the result noted is communal, within the church spilling out into society. We live lives overflowing, devoted to God and for the good of others. To give thanks always to God the Father for everything in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ refers to everything we should be thankful for. That surely takes some effort on our part, especially for some of us. But essential to that here is the imperative to be filled with God’s Spirit. So that we see God’s light in not only the darkness, exposing the works of darkness, but also everything in light of it. So that we can find good to thank God when we consider so many things. While at the same time telling God our concerns and even troubles. This call to enlightened thanksgiving does not at all mean one is to ignore what’s bad. But we’re not to miss all the good. And seeing the good, and giving thanks to God for that ought to be a mark of our lives.

How do we get there, especially if we might struggle with depression, or simply feeling down? We have to be patient. This is something we do, but only through the Spirit. It will take commitment to obedience out of faith to God’s call here. And instead of trying to seek some experience of being filled with the Spirit, we should note that we’ve already been baptized by and drink from the Spirit (1 Corinthians 12:13). We have the Spirit, so we’re told to be filled with that Spirit, not with ourselves. This requires prayer. Only God can help us here. Some say we’re already filled with the Spirit, having as much of the Spirit as we could have. But this is an imperative, so that while we have the Spirit, that doesn’t necessarily mean that we’re filled with the Spirit, or living Spirit-filled lives. And part of the Spirit-filled life in the midst of everything is to find the good to thank God for, and thank him for it.  Something I need to work on myself. In and through Jesus.

Psalm 100

A psalm. For giving grateful praise.

Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.
Worship the Lord with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs.
Know that the Lord is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations.

Billy Graham’s funeral

I watched/listened to Billy Graham’s funeral yesterday. Like with countless others, God had a profound impact on my life through the ministry of Billy Graham. And his life, though peculiarly gifted, is an example for us all.

I thought the funeral was fitting, but also squirmed some when I kept hearing accolades and praise heaped on Billy himself. I was thinking that to simply hear him preach a message as in one of his mission (previously called crusade) programs would have been better. His life was all about pointing people to Jesus and the gospel/good news of God in Jesus through his death on the cross. And yet he was a man deserving of special honor, to be sure.

Songs/hymns which Billy chose, and well done. Good words from his children, and a good closing word from Franklin Graham, echoing his father, and what his father would have wanted and appreciated.

I will forever appreciate and be thankful to God for the life and ministry of Billy Graham along with myriads of others. To God be the glory. In and through Jesus.

giving thanks no matter what

Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.

1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

Today is Thanksgiving Day here in the United States. A special day traditionally set apart to give thanks, spend time with family, and eat.

But giving thanks is to be a habit that we learn to practice day after day. Of course we’re giving thanks to God. But I admit to my chagrin that I don’t always feel thankful. Oftentimes I feel more like the prophet Habakkuk must have felt. There is so much injustice in the world, and then there are problems not only right at my doorstep, but everywhere around me. One doesn’t have to look long or try to imagine. The challenge and brokenness of life and existence too often stares us right in the face.

But we give thanks no matter what. It is something we do regardless. Yes, because of God, who God is, what God has done, is doing, and will do. No matter what we see in front of us, or how we are processing that. And even with song. Just as Habakkuk did. Not a bad book to read today, by the way. With this celebratory ending. All in and through Jesus.

Though the fig tree does not bud
    and there are no grapes on the vines,
though the olive crop fails
    and the fields produce no food,
though there are no sheep in the pen
    and no cattle in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord,
    I will be joyful in God my Savior.

The Sovereign Lord is my strength;
    he makes my feet like the feet of a deer,
    he enables me to tread on the heights.

For the director of music. On my stringed instruments.