trusting in God at all times

Trust in him at all times, you people;
pour out your hearts to him,
for God is our refuge.

Psalm 62:8

There are times which especially seem to test our faith in God. Somehow our belief in God’s goodness can correlate with whether or not things are working out as we might expect. Even when in this life, we can be sure that often things will not.

God’s goodness is above and beyond circumstances. And God’s goodness and greatness go together. So that regardless of the mistakes we make, and less than the best choices, and even grievous sins along the way, provided we repent, or try to learn from our mistakes, and even when we fail to, God remains God. Life remains an existence in this broken, sin-cursed world. We can’t expect either to change. Just because God is great and God is good, as scripture says, doesn’t mean that life under the sun in this present existence will not be without its difficulties, disappointments, and indeed dilemmas, not to mention dangers, along the way, as scripture says.

We’re called to trust in God at all times, which often is not easy for us in the midst of our trials and own weakness. But that’s God’s call to us. And an important part of that is expectations. God is always great and always good, and will be at work in everything for our good, as we trust in him, and live according to his will. But all the rest, including we ourselves, is limited at best, and flawed to the point of broken, at worst. It is healthy to realize both, clearly evident in scripture and life.

So God is great and good, and life under the sun has difficulty mixed in with goodness, and will have its problems all the way through. We are called to trust in God at all times in this existence, and to pour out our hearts to him in prayer. With the promise and reality that God is our refuge. It is God to whom we go, and in whom we trust. And we need to do so, just as the psalm tells us, to find our rest in him, no matter what. In and through Jesus.

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our hope in the salvation and new creation to come

Years back I read a book (or parts of it) which suggested that we never arrive to complete satisfaction or fulfillment in this life, even while we do have experiences of such (like just a calm day in the wonder of creation somewhere), because God has something better to come. Not that this life isn’t good, and doesn’t have good, even much good. But there are problems galore. The curse due to sin is certainly on us. It is a fallen, broken existence here, everywhere you look. And yet glorious as well, since God is the creator. And humans are created in God’s image with both a great capacity for good, and due to being sinners and even under the influence of moral, spiritual darkness, for evil.

This doesn’t mean we fold our tents and sit around waiting for the Lord’s return, not at all. We are busy and seeking to live in faith, believing that this world matters in God’s eyes, and should matter to us. It is God’s creation which God redeemed and reconciled to himself in Christ, and will someday make completely new after the final judgment and salvation to come at Christ’s return.

We want to do the best we can now, but with the realization that a curse lies on everything. This makes it harder now, but it also helps us relax and just keep on keeping on while this and that goes wrong, or is not what we would like it to be. Also with the realization that we sadly don’t even have a glimpse of some of what we might and maybe should understand, in this life, that we are limited indeed.

We are thankful to God for answered prayer and all the good in this life. But we know God has something better for us and for the world in the new creation to come when God makes all things new in Jesus. It will still be breathtaking and glorious and wonderful, and much more so, because the curse will be gone. In and through Jesus.

relax into routine: part of rest

“Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Matthew 11:28-30

Some jobs seem so high stress, and maybe to a point are, especially at certain junctures. But once we get used to them, they can in a way become “old hat” to us. We can learn to settle down, maybe slow down, and simply be at rest.

Jesus’s words invite us into that kind of activity, even routine of being at rest when we work. Because he is with us, we are with him, and he is making the load light.

Part of living in this world though is to live under the curse of Genesis 3:

To Adam [the LORD God] said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’

“Cursed is the ground because of you;
    through painful toil you will eat food from it
    all the days of your life.
It will produce thorns and thistles for you,
    and you will eat the plants of the field.
By the sweat of your brow
    you will eat your food
until you return to the ground,
    since from it you were taken;
for dust you are
    and to dust you will return.”

Genesis 3:17-19

Humankind in the story is agrarian at that point: working the ground to plant and cultivate vegetation and fruit was a large part of what they did. But now they would have to contend with all sorts of problems. Creation would seem to become at odds with itself.

And that’s what we find in our work, even though most of it is not agriculture. Even with human manipulation, we run into all sorts of problems. Humanity is inherently limited. Although it appears from Genesis 11 that they are more than capable intellectually, so that in that story God stopped what they were doing. Knowledge is not enough. Humanity needs wisdom as well, and not the worldly wisdom of the serpent, but the loving wisdom of the kingdom of God and the shalom (translated “peace” and including the meaning of flourishing) that comes with it.

Somehow we need, even in the midst of trouble and seeming failure to learn to have a restful spirit in all we do. Not given to panic, not in fear of this or that. And even when we have to “grab the bull by the horns,” so to speak, we need to do so as people who are at rest. Believing that our work is not only God-ordained, work being good, part of creation, but that also we do so as those who would be in gospel kingdom work with our Lord, which somehow can be weaved into the other work, and maybe become a part of it.

That’s my goal, to relax into the routine, becoming more and more at rest in and through Jesus.

the blessing of work

Labor Day is the last summer holiday in the United States before traditionally the school year begins, and summer vacation time ordinarily ends. The United States is known for its hard work, although certainly not all of that historically is honorable when we consider the slave trade of the past. And work easily becomes an end in itself, even idolatrous, instead of being a blessed means to a blessed end from God.

We can all thank God for the opportunity to work, whether in blue or white collar jobs, as well as for the education or training that is available to land a job. Work in itself is good, a part of creation. What is not of creation, but rather the fall, as the story is told in Genesis 3, and therefore not a part of the new creation, but the current old, broken creation is the toil and struggle inherent in work now.

To Adam he said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’

“Cursed is the ground because of you;
    through painful toil you will eat food from it
    all the days of your life.
It will produce thorns and thistles for you,
    and you will eat the plants of the field.
By the sweat of your brow
    you will eat your food
until you return to the ground,
    since from it you were taken;
for dust you are
    and to dust you will return.”

Genesis 3:17-19

And so there you have it: Work is a blessing subject to the curse in which trouble along with the limitations of being a human of this fallen creation (“dust”) are inherently a part. And so I can expect more problems at work on Tuesday, along with the blessing of the work itself, and what that work accomplishes.

Christians are to be known as exemplary workers: for our work and I think also for our rest. We should be diligent, reliable workers, yet not workaholics, who fail to enjoy the fruit of their labors, and miss a large part of the point of them (see Ecclesiastes).

…make it your ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.

1 Thessalonians 4:11-12

 Today is a day to relax, and thank God for the work we have. And pray for those who may be out of work. As we continue our work for the provision of our families, for the good it provides, and to the honor and praise of God.

the importance of one’s work

I’m not sure if you can attach work to vocation, or God’s calling, which is part of my frustration in writing, but in some general sense one surely can. Because God’s creation of humanity in God’s image involves representing God in the world in what humans do in their rule which is actual stewardship over the earth and God’s creation on earth. Work is important from the beginning, and only the toil due to working with the thorns comes from the curse of the ground because of humanity’s sin.

Work is certainly not the most important aspect of who we are, which is surely to know and love God, and in that communion to know and love each other. But we can’t separate work from that, because it’s part of the whole. Just as we rejoice in God’s works, we can rejoice in the good works of each other, and in those which God enables us to do.

We have the Protestant work ethic on the one hand, but also the Protestant penchant for being suspicious of good works. The former might have been mostly from Calvin and the latter inherited from Luther, but it’s not fair to suggest that those who emphasize rest from works in the faith that’s apart from works, fail to work themselves. The best of those traditions have some good understanding and balance between the faith that rests and the faith that works.

I love work, and hard work at that. Often I find it quite therapeutic. I may be under something, but not only the distraction, but effort of work helps one to settle into a kind of peace or blessing from God. Of course everything is a gift from God, work included. Works will continue beyond this life, but what we won’t miss is all the difficulties that can come with work in the here and now. Overcoming such difficulties indeed can be part of the fun now, but often require plenty of patience and persistence, and rest when those kinds of days come mercifully to an end.

Work is a part of who we are as humans. We’re given something to do which includes something of a creative capacity from God as well as the ability to cope with creation. All the while rejoicing in God’s works, and being thankful for the good works given to us. Even while we look forward to the rest to come in the next life, which actually will include even more works I take it. But done in the sphere of the new creation in which the dynamic will be striking, a work grounded in a wonderful freedom of love. In and through Jesus and to the glory of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.