the fruit of the Spirit, the love of the cross

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. Let us not become conceited, provoking and envying each other.

Galatians 5:22-26

Something of the practical culmination of Paul’s letter to the Galatians, we are seeing how this new life no longer under Torah (the Law), but under the Spirit is to be worked out in life. We see that while it is a fruit of the Spirit, something we could never come up with ourselves, we still have responsibility in living it out. It doesn’t just happen automatically. We can fall into sins of the flesh, and inevitably will if we fail to walk by the Spirit.

The fruit of the Spirit here in its essence is a love which is the same as the love of the cross, by which I mean Christ’s love made known and given to us through his death, so that we not only receive its benefits, but participate in it in this life. When you read the entire letter to the Galatians you see that Paul’s argument is inextricably linked to the cross, to Christ’s death for us, of course followed by his resurrection. So that all that follows comes from that.

Love is straightforward in that love is love. But the love spoken of here is not the love we find in the world. There’s overlap, but through and through it is genuinely different. It is a love which forgives others, and doesn’t hold grudges. It’s a love willing to sacrifice for the good of others, whatever the cost might be. It’s a love which never accepts or rejoices in evil, but delights in truth prevailing in all of life. 1 Corinthians 13 describes this love well. No less than the love of Christ himself.

What is needed in our lives is nothing less than the fruit of the Spirit. We have to depend on the Holy Spirit and as we do, we’ll see the Spirit’s fruit, and the love which is surely the heart of it become more and more a part of who we are and how we live. In and through Jesus.

a lazy faith

“To the angel of the church in Laodicea write:

These are the words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God’s creation. I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either one or the other! So, because you are lukewarm—neither hot nor cold—I am about to spit you out of my mouth. You say, ‘I am rich; I have acquired wealth and do not need a thing.’ But you do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked. I counsel you to buy from me gold refined in the fire, so you can become rich; and white clothes to wear, so you can cover your shameful nakedness; and salve to put on your eyes, so you can see.

Those whom I love I rebuke and discipline. So be earnest and repent. Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person, and they with me.

To the one who is victorious, I will give the right to sit with me on my throne, just as I was victorious and sat down with my Father on his throne. Whoever has ears, let them hear what the Spirit says to the churches.”

Revelation 3

I often find, sadly, that when things are going well, I can have a quite lazy faith. One might even say this can be a first world problem, because relatively speaking compared to many in the world, life is good for most of us. Although hard trials can barge in to any person or family, to be sure. What I don’t like are the very issues and problems through which I might end up much closer to God, and more like Jesus, than I would have been without them.

In the case of the Laodicean church, there was nothing the matter, and life was good. They were living it up in the lap of luxury. Thankfully for them, the Lord was not going to let them go. He stepped in to discipline them in love. He was longing for their communion with him, no less. This isn’t really a passage for salvation, though I’m sure God has used it that way to bring sinners into the fold. But it’s aimed at a church of at least professing believers, surely some of them born of the Spirit, but lazy in their faith to the point that faith was not something really needed for this life.

I can imagine that for some, the way they’ve been mistaught, faith is more or less about getting to heaven someday when they die, akin to what Dallas Willard used to call a “bar code” Christianity. But if we open our Bibles and keep turning the pages, we will see all the many ways that faith is for this life. And particularly when we’re up against it, our faith is awakened to possibilities which before were not needed. And we can grow in our faith, and from that in our development as mature people in a way we otherwise would not (James 1).

The Lord didn’t leave the believers who thought they had it all together alone, and he won’t leave us alone either. He loves us too much for that. Let’s respond to that love, and open the door, and let the Lord have his way in every part of our lives.