accepting one another, living in grace

Accept one another, then, just as Christ accepted you, in order to bring praise to God.

Romans 15:7

There is nothing quite like a genuine acceptance of each other in Christ because of grace. And there is nothing quite so stifling and cold as when we refuse to do that, or do it with strings attached.

Everyone alive has their issues. No one has arrived, of course. And we all have our particular struggles, not to mention our blind spots. We are all in process. And in the passage quoted above, it is in the section in Romans 14 and 15 about disputable matters in which Christians can differ. In the context of that day with reference to what was actually clean and unclean in terms of the new covenant replacing the old. And it’s a bit complicated.

But fast forward to where we live today, and it can be in terms of all kinds of things, but at the heart of it is an attitude of judging someone else, so that we hold them at arm’s length, and likely see them somehow as inferior to ourselves, either in their character, or in their faith.

What we need is quite the opposite. If we focus on what’s negative about ourselves or others, then we will likely miss what God is actually doing. And the well is poisoned. Instead we need to accept both ourselves, and each other, just as God in and through Christ accepts us. So that we can be open to the goodness of what God is doing even in us, as well as our brother and sister in Christ. And so we can be hopeful of God’s movement of grace in others.

The only way we can live and go on well ourselves. And something we must apply in our attitude to others as well, in and through Jesus.

hanging in there with each other

We who are strong ought to bear with the failings of the weak and not to please ourselves. Each of us should please our neighbors for their good,to build them up. For even Christ did not please himself but, as it is written: “The insults of those who insult you have fallen on me.” For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through the endurance taught in the Scriptures and the encouragement they provide we might have hope.

May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you the same attitude of mind toward each other that Christ Jesus had, so that with one mind and one voice you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Accept one another, then, just as Christ accepted you, in order to bring praise to God.

Romans 15

Weak and strong have to do with the changes that were taking place with the coming of the new covenant in which many rules, even the schema of the old covenant, was being put aside since the fulfillment of it in Christ and through his death, had already come. It was not an easy time, a time of change. It was not like Christians at that time had to put all the old practices aside. But they had to accept the new reality that other Christians were not going to practice them, and would still be completely accepted by God, so that they too would need to accept them. They were the majority at first, but in a matter of a relatively short time would become the minority as more and more Gentiles would come to the faith.

We can apply this passage in a looser sense with strong and weak perhaps signifying scruples and religious practices. What might be out of bounds for some, might not be any problem for others. Of course I’m not talking about out and out sin, but rather things that might lead some, the “weak” into sin. What might not be a problem for me might be an occasion of stumbling for them, so that I won’t be acting in love if I flaunt my freedom in their presence.

Also I need to be careful not to judge others on things which in themselves are not sin, covered by God’s grace. I might possibly be termed as “weak” in those situations. God looks at the heart. Some practice might be better than others, and maybe it doesn’t matter. But oftentimes what we know is best for us, or what we’re accustomed to, we impose on others, and judge them according to those standards. Which might in fact not be helpful to them, even if they might possibly learn something from our own practice.

We must accept one another fully, even as Christ has fully accepted us, that we together might bring glory to God. A big part of that is simply learning to get along well with our differences, some of that contrast perhaps being uncomfortable to us like the sound of chalk on a blackboard. For this to happen, we need to pray, and be open to the work of the Spirit in drawing us together in harmony, so that in that, we might bring praise together to God. Getting along with each other is a high priority to God. And the essence of what it means to be “in Christ.” Of course as those who are seeking to live in the grace and truth of our Lord. In and through Jesus.

the knowledge which matters in the kingdom

Now about food sacrificed to idols: We know that “We all possess knowledge.” But knowledge puffs up while love builds up. Those who think they know something do not yet know as they ought to know. But whoever loves God is known by God.

1 Corinthians 8

In this passage (to see its entirety, click the above link), Paul goes on to argue his point in terms of theology. So it’s not like knowledge is set aside. But the context for knowledge ends up being crucial for us in Jesus.

Of course we need to see knowledge with reference to the received tradition of the church, how the church has read and interpreted the scriptures with the assumption that at least in matters pertaining to the gospel, the church has been led by the Spirit in its basic teaching, setting details of difference around many subjects aside.

Paul’s concern in the passage is a failure not to act out of love for a weaker brother or sister, or for one who may be coming to faith, but whose faith may still not be established. Interestingly, Paul then goes on to teach why those who had scruples over the possibility of eating food sacrificed to idols, actually shouldn’t worry about it, since an idol is nothing at all in the world, there being one God alone. And Paul says, as well, that Christians, whose conscience is strong on this issue, should still refuse to eat food sacrificed to idols, when they know such has been sacrificed as in consecrated to an idol, not for their own sake, but for the sake of others whose consciences may be weak due to their lack of understanding on the matter.

The point here is that in everything we need to be acting out of love, and not in an assumed superiority of knowledge. And when we do so, the knowledge we need from God will come. But in this text, that our goal is to help the weak out of love. This is something of what got Jesus himself in trouble with the religious authorities he was interacting with. They were about acting on their interpretation of truth; Jesus was about helping others in love to come to a knowledge of the truth, which in essence ends up being Jesus himself.

Love is crucial when we are considering how to approach matters which lend themselves to controversy, a love grounded in the gospel both in terms of is direction and goal. So that we see everything, certainly reflecting on such with the best reason in terms of no less than that out of love for God and for others.