Jesus calming the storm

That day when evening came, he said to his disciples, “Let us go over to the other side.” Leaving the crowd behind, they took him along, just as he was, in the boat. There were also other boats with him. A furious squall came up, and the waves broke over the boat, so that it was nearly swamped. Jesus was in the stern, sleeping on a cushion. The disciples woke him and said to him, “Teacher, don’t you care if we drown?”

He got up, rebuked the wind and said to the waves, “Quiet! Be still!” Then the wind died down and it was completely calm.

He said to his disciples, “Why are you so afraid? Do you still have no faith?”

They were terrified and asked each other, “Who is this? Even the wind and the waves obey him!”

Mark 4:35-41

There’s no doubt that there are many storms in our lives. Sometimes just the normal stuff that comes and goes, like an unexpected problem that brings some stress. Once in a while, something more serious, be it an illness, loss of job, something else.

Like the disciples, we have Jesus present with us, who can calm any storm. And if it’s not in God’s will to stop what is happening, then at least Jesus can stop the storm in our hearts for sure.

(From what I’ve read, the application might actually be that Jesus is challenging the disciples to speak into the storm themselves, which would have required a faith far beyond what they had. Or it may simply refer to their lack of trust in God in the midst of the storm. I suppose I prefer the latter interpretation. And certainly would not accept a “word of faith” kind of interpretation such as we find in some circles.)

James on trials and uncertainty

Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything. If any of you lacks wisdom, you should ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to you. But when you ask, you must believe and not doubt, because the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That person should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. Such a person is double-minded and unstable in all they do.

James 1:2-8

James, though a pastor comes across, at least to us as rather blunt, and certainly to the point. He doesn’t waste words. His letter is considered the one New Testament book more in line with the wisdom writings of the Old Testament: Job, Proverbs and Ecclesiastes.

James lived during a time of uncertainty. The church was young and he was the first pastor of the church in Jerusalem, Peter certainly a pastor, but more of an apostle to the Jews at large in the world of that time. God had given the church as he does today the gift of the Spirit to be a witness to the gospel by deed and word, first by the difference evident in their lives, and a witness as to what makes that difference.

Fast forward to today. We live in a different time for sure. And depending on where we live, possibly quite different circumstances. But one thing is for sure, as evident in this passage: trials will come, and many kinds of them.

As this passage makes clear, our response to such will determine whether or not we grow in Christian maturity, and to what extent we do. None of us will get this perfect. And there will be moments and maybe even times when we don’t consider such pure joy. But when, apart from our feelings, thoughts or anything else we choose to consider such pure joy, then we can begin to enter into what God has for us in the midst and through such trials.

We’re invited when we lack wisdom, which in ourselves is always the case, to ask God for it. That’s a relief, because left to ourselves, we more often, or at least I more often than not resort to something that is less than that, and can even be foolish. I’ve seen that time and time again in my life, since I’ve either failed to ask God for it, or operated as if God wasn’t much in the picture. Maybe a bystander who created everything, but then is not involved in that creation, certainly not the God of the Bible. It’s interesting how we might believe something intellectually, but act as if we don’t. We need to then ask ourselves if we believe it at all. God can help us with our lack of faith, as we call out to him, like the man did to Jesus.

So there’s purpose and encouragement in this passage, both short term and long. This is true regardless of what we face, whatever trial it may be. As we respond in faith according to God’s word here, God will be with us, and continue to mature us, giving us the wisdom we need. In and through Jesus.

utter dependence on God

We do not want you to be uninformed, brothers and sisters, about the troubles we experienced in the province of Asia. We were under great pressure, far beyond our ability to endure, so that we despaired of life itself. Indeed, we felt we had received the sentence of death. But this happened that we might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises the dead. He has delivered us from such a deadly peril, and he will deliver us again. On him we have set our hope that he will continue to deliver us, as you help us by your prayers. Then many will give thanks on our behalf for the gracious favor granted us in answer to the prayers of many.

2 Corinthians 1:8-11

It’s interesting how time and time again in Scripture, we see God’s people have to push through in the midst of great weakness. I find it to be true that God meets us not when we might think we’ve arrived, but when we know we haven’t.

The point is not feeling like we can’t do it, but only that we can’t do it ourselves, in our own strength. Continuing on, seeking to be faithful to God’s call in dependence only on God. Which means we’ll often feel like we’re flying by the seat of our pants, so to speak. And always and forever entirely dependent on God. In and through Jesus.

little by little over time

They will be called oaks of righteousness,
a planting of the Lord
for the display of his splendor.

Isaiah 61:3b

Oak trees are among the most sturdy and long lasting trees, it seems. But they don’t grow quickly. The kind of growth required for the tree it is takes time.

In Isaiah, people are likened to oaks, those God is “planting.” When you read Scripture and consider the spiritual life, all of this takes time. Christian spiritual maturity is not arrived to overnight. Nor does some overwhelming experience add up to Christian maturity. In fact that can easily lend itself to deception, someone thinking they’ve arrived when they haven’t, or couldn’t. We need the young saplings, exuberant in their new life, glowing in their witness of that. But it will take time, wind, storms, sunshine and rain, and more time for them to grow into the sturdy, mature trees they need to become.

Some of us are pretty full grown, but as Christians we know our growth never ends in this lifetime. We have weathered many a storm, learned to stand firm in the winds with roots embedded in the water of life found in Christ and Scripture. And as part of God’s community, the church. But if we don’t watch out, we could become diseased and in danger of no longer standing. It is sad, the accounts of those who didn’t end their Christian lives well. Sometimes the older trees are not appreciated for all the blessing they give. It’s like, they’ve seen their day, they’re old now and not of much consequence, not to be paid attention to. But we need to keep growing, and in silence and prayer continue to bear fruit from and for God.

Little by little, over time. That’s what it takes. And to keep on doing that come what may. That God might be honored and glorified. In and through Jesus.

when feeling beat up and torn from limb to limb

Now Ahab told Jezebel everything Elijah had done and how he had killed all the prophets with the sword. So Jezebel sent a messenger to Elijah to say, “May the gods deal with me, be it ever so severely, if by this time tomorrow I do not make your life like that of one of them.”

Elijah was afraid and ran for his life. When he came to Beersheba in Judah, he left his servant there, while he himself went a day’s journey into the wilderness. He came to a broom bush, sat down under it and prayed that he might die. “I have had enough, LORD,” he said. “Take my life; I am no better than my ancestors.” Then he lay down under the bush and fell asleep.

All at once an angel touched him and said, “Get up and eat.” He looked around, and there by his head was some bread baked over hot coals, and a jar of water. He ate and drank and then lay down again.

The angel of the LORD came back a second time and touched him and said, “Get up and eat, for the journey is too much for you.” So he got up and ate and drank. Strengthened by that food, he traveled forty days and forty nights until he reached Horeb, the mountain of God. There he went into a cave and spent the night.

1 Kings 19:1-9a

The Bible calls God’s people loved ones as in family (children, sons and daughters), servants and slaves to God and for others, and oddly enough soldiers engaged in battle– spiritual today. Sometimes in the wear and tear of life, what one has to physically, mentally, emotionally go through wears one down to the point of exhaustion. And with exhaustion frequently comes depression.

But God’s care will also be present. Elijah himself lived in a most difficult place during a dark time in Israel’s history. His life seems one of extremes, especially if you consider this story alone. He had confronted the prophets of Baal, God had shown himself to be God, the people had responded, but the dreaded Queen was out to get his life. And Elijah had the sense that he was all alone.

But God met him at that difficult place. And God is able to meet us as well. We may not know what we need, but God does. We must continue on in faith. A faith which might wonder about things and question God. But with the realization that God will meet us where we are, and give us what we need to carry on in his will. In and through Jesus.

accept difficulties?!?

Mortals, born of woman,
are of few days and full of trouble.

Job 14:1

Job’s words may seem like a far too pessimistic view of life, and that this passage should be taken in the context of Job’s great troubles. Yes, maybe so, but there are numerous people who have faced tremendous difficulties. And we all do to some extent. Where I live we talk about “first world” problems to give some perspective. But even in our situation, we’re not immune to most any of the difficulties others face aside from the differences in stark places where one’s faith and even humanity are not accepted.

It’s good to accept the inevitable bad that will come with life. “With acceptance comes peace.” In fact it’s a necessity if we’re to go on and do well in life, do what needs to be done. Of course we’ll have to prayerfully work through our problems. And perhaps just pray about other problems that we can do nothing about.

In this wisdom book, Job was trying to help what became his accusers to see that his plight was illustrative of life, what can happen in someone’s life, and what on a lesser scale occurs in one way or another in everyone’s life. Their lack of understanding seemed to be partly in the idea that the righteous are blessed so that they don’t encounter what would plainly be understood to be a curse. Imagine someone venerated for goodness who falls on hard times and then whose goodness is questioned. Fortunately for us, this book helps us see the precariousness of such a position.

It’s important to hold steady during the troubling times, even the most difficult. Hold steady in faith and perseverance in trying to do what is good and right. Admittedly that is more challenging when one is faced with the hardest things of life: the loss of a close loved one, one’s livelihood lost with little or nothing to fall on, etc. We don’t do well to point fingers at people and tell them something trite like simply, “Accept your difficulties.” We need to stand with such people as individuals and as a society, something which should be natural for the church, but should include the state as well. There needs to be a safety net, and God’s people need to be present for each other, as well as for others.

In the meantime we need to hold steady ourselves. Not living in some sort of denial, but facing our problems honestly, head on, thoughtfully and above all, prayerfully with faith that God can and will see us through each and everyone of them. In and through Jesus.

light for life

נ Nun

Your word is a lamp for my feet,
a light on my path.
I have taken an oath and confirmed it,
that I will follow your righteous laws.
I have suffered much;
preserve my life, LORD, according to your word.
Accept, LORD, the willing praise of my mouth,
and teach me your laws.
Though I constantly take my life in my hands,
I will not forget your law.
The wicked have set a snare for me,
but I have not strayed from your precepts.
Your statutes are my heritage forever;
they are the joy of my heart.
My heart is set on keeping your decrees
to the very end.[a]

Psalm 119:105-112

God’s word is a light for our lives. But for that to be so, there must be the commitment on our part not only to receive it, but to daily live in it through all the difficulties and troubles life brings.

The psalmist remained in God’s word through the danger he (or she) faced, undeterred and determined, finding reward and joy in that word. Our privilege also in and through Jesus.