learning to trust in God in real life

I lie down and sleep;
    I wake again, because the LORD sustains me.

Psalm 3

Some of us are more prone to anxiety and worry than others. I am, and my wife is not. She is just the opposite, which is nice, but also poses its challenges. There is good in being aware of dangers, and real problems, which might not be readily apparent, and trying to fix or deal with them, as best one can. But in my case, I find that a lot of my fears can be a direct challenge to faith. In other words, do I work at trusting in the Lord, or do I remain paralyzed in fear?

The psalmist was facing real dangers. They were bad things which indeed could happen. But it seems that the psalmist also came to rest in God, and God’s will, and within that, God’s protection, so that he could rest easily at night, confident that his life was in God’s hands.

For myself, I find that some good sleep can make a world of difference. I wake up refreshed, and feeling much better, what fears I had having dissipated. While the counsel we once received, to never act on our fears, or while we’re afraid, is sound advice we do well to keep, there may be some things we can do toward alleviating the problem, leaving the outcome to God.

But above all, we must trust in God, learn to trust in him. So that our hearts can be more and more at rest in him, and his promises to us. In and through Jesus.

continuing in the word in the Word: “in Christ” and “in Christ…crucified”

Jesus answered him, “Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them.

John 14

Regardless of what happens in the unexpected twists and turns of life, the Christian, or follower of Christ is grounded in the faith: dependent on Christ, but also calling one to faith. I would like to say, calling us to faith, since it’s a community endeavor. Being in the word in the Word is key.

Perhaps Greg Boyd is getting at some vital, even though I’m not sure I would end up agreeing with some of his conclusions (see his tome, The Crucifixion of the Warrior God. I await the shorter version due, I read, in August). But I am confident that at least there’s something to be said for the idea of reading all of scripture through the lens of Christ, and Christ crucified. As Christians, we endeavor to read the text in its original context, and ultimately as something fulfilled by Christ, so that in a certain sense the text is in Christ, or to be read in the light of Christ. And at the heart of Christ and his coming is his crucifixion, his death on the cross, and the God who is love being revealed in that light.

While scripture doesn’t talk explicitly about being “in the Word,” “in Christ” is repeated over and over again in the New/Final Testament, especially in Paul’s letters. It is shorthand for what is most essential in understanding the faith for our faith. So that no matter what I’m facing, or what we are facing together, the reality of remaining “in Christ” remains intact. And an important aspect of that is to remain in scripture, in God’s word. I take it that we feed on Christ both through the word and through the sacrament, Holy Communion/the Eucharist. For those of us (and I live among them) who don’t accept the view of the church at large since early times that somehow Jesus is especially present in the bread and the wine (not in the way the Roman Catholics suggest, but perhaps more like the Eastern Orthodox, or better yet for me, the description of that given by John Calvin), we at least acknowledge that we can feed on Christ by being in the word, in scripture. As we read it in the light of Christ’s fulfillment, in our union in him.

All kinds of things change, we get older, new problems and sometimes grave difficulties face us. But one thing remains for us, whatever else happens in our world, and in the world: In the faith by faith we are “in Christ,” and in that union both as individuals, and together, dependent on God through his word. Each of us must do this, but part of that is to do so in communion with all the saints, in the fellowship of the church. In and through Jesus.

against paralyzing fear

Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. Resist him, standing firm in the faith, because you know that the family of believers throughout the world is undergoing the same kind of sufferings.

1 Peter 5

The most often repeated command in scripture is to not be afraid. I often carry with me nagging fears about this or that, but ordinarily relatively benign. Like the need to replace a non-functioning turn signal, or check to make sure the roof is not leaking. Even those can have a cumulative, wearing effect on us, so they do need to be addressed, even if the solution is simply to let it go as not worth the trouble. The big problem comes when fear wins over faith, when the fear we’re experiencing all but knocks out our faith.

In the passage above, a lion can gain advantage over its intended prey by paralyzing it with fear. Just a long enough hesitation can be all that the lion needs to pounce on it for the kill. Paralyzing fear is a sure sign that it’s not a legitimate fear, but one to be rejected. And that involves nothing less than spiritual warfare, even as we see from the text above (and see Ephesians 6:10-20). After working through that, we might be able to find some legitimate underlying fear, which we can take care of.

Faith in God certainly doesn’t preclude responsibility on our part. A good example of that is when the devil tempted Jesus with the words that he should simply throw himself off of the top of the temple, depending in faith on God’s promise that the angels would be there to protect the righteous when they fall. Jesus countered that text taken out of context by the devil with the scripture: “You shall not test the Lord your God” (Matthew 4). Which means expecting God to deliver what God has never promised. In faith we depend on God without reservation. While in prayer, we do what we’re supposed to do, or what might solve a problem, and settle a legitimate fear.

In all of this, no matter what we face we must have faith in God. That God will fulfill his promises, and ultimately take care of everything. And in that process, help us make decisions, and ultimately grow in wisdom and in the likeness of his Son. Individually, but also together, in and through Jesus.

when everything seems uncertain, unsettled, with upheaval and change

There are times and seasons when one is in the midst of it. Where so many uncertainties exist, and when a number of issues can be hanging in the balance. Add to that the fact that bad things can and sometimes do happen. One is left with an uneasy sense of deja vu, either of “here we go again,” or what one dreaded coming to pass.

That is when we need to continue all the more in our practice to be grounded in God and God’s word. “This too will pass,” and how we are in terms of both our disposition and actions is critical during such times. There may indeed need to be adjustments made, and life itself can force that on someone. We need to take one thing at a time, and go from there. We can be assured in the midst of it all, that God will be with us in Jesus. And that God will help us by the Spirit.

And so the watchword for us is faith: faith in God, in God’s word, God’s promise to us in Jesus. And endeavoring to find and become more and more settled into God’s will through it all.

always pray

Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up. He said: “In a certain town there was a judge who neither feared God nor cared what people thought. And there was a widow in that town who kept coming to him with the plea, ‘Grant me justice against my adversary.’

“For some time he refused. But finally he said to himself, ‘Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think, yet because this widow keeps bothering me, I will see that she gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!’”

And the Lord said, “Listen to what the unjust judge says. And will not God bring about justice for his chosen ones, who cry out to him day and night? Will he keep putting them off? I tell you, he will see that they get justice, and quickly. However, when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on the earth?”

Luke 18

Jesus seems to present two alternatives in this parable told to his disciples. We either pray or we give up, one or the other. And the plea here is for justice, for what is right, and I would add to that, what is good. Shalom is the transliterated Hebrew word for peace which includes prosperity and flourishing, along with the absence of conflict. Certainly justice and righteousness are at the heart of that.

The need to always pray implies that there will always be a need in this present life for justice, in this context in terms of getting one’s rights, and usually in scripture always inclusive of others, especially those who are often on the short end of that, in scripture that being orphans, widows, and refugees (or strangers/aliens).

And so our call is to pray, and not give up, not lose heart (NRSV). And Jesus clearly suggests that to pray is to have faith, and to not pray is to be lacking in it, to have little or no faith at all. And along with that is an implied contrast. The unjust judge reluctantly provides justice in the story, actually out of self-interest. Since that is the case, the question is asked, how much more will God provide the same to his people, who continue to pray to him? But Jesus then suggests that even though this is the case, it is not certain that even God’s people will pray at least as they ought to.

This helps me see both the importance, as well as the difficulty in continuing in this kind of prayer. In this world one can look only to God for a final resolution to everything. And even for the grace to carry on when one is shortchanged in this life. That is the challenge for me: to pray at all, and to keep praying. It is easy either to drift along thinking all is well enough and under control, or to be overwhelmed with problems to the point in which one is tempted to give up. Instead God wants us to pray, and to continue in prayer. A true test of our faith. In and through Jesus.

 

 

making the most of what is

It is easy for me to think of what might have been if I had done this or that, or not done something else. It’s all too easy for me to dwell on that. “What if?” might be an interesting exercise, but it ends up being more like a game than a player in reality, not helpful at all. Probably I would have been quite different, at least in what I do had I made this or that choice. I certainly wouldn’t have ended up writing this.

We do well to make the most of what is, rather than wasting any time over what might have been. We actually can ill afford any luxury of dreaming of what might have been, which in itself is perhaps rather a fool’s errand anyhow, since there is enough trouble in this world to go around for all. Some might indeed be better set in some ways, and devoted to all kinds of good works for others, though none of us are excused from doing good works out of faith and love. But all face difficulties at the least, and tragedy along with pitfalls are no respecter of persons or status. And we who seem on the short end of life in some ways should be glad for the blessing of others. And like Paul said (1 Timothy 6), encourage the rich to do good with the resources and opportunities they have.

But we need to see the good in our situation as well, including what is not ideal. God works through weakness and in difficulties in ways God may not have worked otherwise. Need often brings about a faith which otherwise would not have come. I think of some of the accounts in the gospel, quite a few of them, actually, where people appealed to Jesus out of great need. And the Laodicean church which was rich and prosperous in the eyes of the world was poor and impoverished in Christ’s eyes.

But we need also to get away from comparing, period, somehow imagining our situation is better than that of others. We ultimately are in this all together anyhow, as those in Jesus. Our lot is what it is, and we need to find God’s will and Jesus in the midst of it. To mind our own business, so to speak, and seek to do well where we’re at. To grow there through the gospel in and through Jesus.

life in the pressure cooker

Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything.

James 1

Have you ever noticed how through the difficulties and pressures of life you grow, but when things are easy, you can flounder? I speak for myself in saying that I readily identify with that thought.

Fortunately life is quite full in terms of both challenges and responsibilities. It is good to learn how to rest well, even to relax and enjoy, in fact probably more vitally important than what we think. I remember our Lord’s words to his disciples, “Come apart, and rest awhile.” They weren’t able to rest for long, though, with the clamoring crowds all around them.

I turn again and again to scripture, to God’s word especially when I feel under siege, but I want to do so through thick and thin. We can do that no matter what we’re facing, certain of God’s faithfulness through it all. Even in the trials, that God is at work for good. Therefore we need to hang in there, hang tough even in our weakness through the difficulties. Confident of a good outcome in and through Jesus.